Attractions In Lasithi (Sitia)

Explore The Attractions Of Lasithi (Sitia)
Aghios Konstantinos Monastery, Dories
Crete / Lasithi (Sitia)

Look at the few aged icons, including one of Theotokos from the 14th century and a fine example of the style known as Hodeghitiria, usually associated with Constantinople. This is a sign that the Cretan school of iconography was borrowing ideas from all over. The belfry is late 19th century, and dates to just before the monastery was disolved (1900).

Aghios Nikolaos Archaeological Museum
Crete / Lasithi (Sitia)

Eight rooms, covering the period from Neolithic (Around 3,000BC) to Roman, including the so-called ‘Goddess of Myrtos’ jug, which is worth visiting the museum for, alone. There are also finds here from the palace of Mallia, Siteia and the area of Mirabello.

Bramiana Lake
Crete / Lasithi (Sitia)

Nestling a few kilometres to the North West of Ierapetra in South East Crete sits the reservoir of Bramiana, one of Crete’s biggest wetlands. This Europa 2000 Nature Reserve, known primarily for its bird life, is also a botanical wonderland.

Castle of Siteia
Crete / Lasithi (Sitia)

The castle of Siteia is mostly in ruins now, with the exception of a double-storied tower, with round look out points. It is well worth visiting, however, and lies on a hill looking over the pleasant seaside town of the same name. The original castle, built by the Genoese “pirate”, Enrico Pescatore, in the early 13th century, was closer to the sea, but this was destroyed by a couple of earthquakes and raids by the corsair, Hairedin Barbarossa, in the 1530s. The Venetians decided that the new castle needed to be higher up the hill if it were to withstand further attacks, but within a few years Siteia and its castle were in the hands of the Ottoman Turks, who did not rebuild it.

Gournia, Pacheia Ammos, Ierapetra
Crete / Lasithi (Sitia)

Dating back to the EMIII period (around 2100 BC), the town of Gournia continued to be settled through to the late 13th C. BC, with occasional interruptions. It is a remarkably well-preserved site, and has been dubbed the “Pompeii of Crete”. Situated by the coast, equidistant between the Aghios Nikolaos and the village of Mochlos, it was first excavated by the American archaeologist, Harriet Boyd, at the beginning of the 20th century, It’s a lovely place to visit, both for its setting and the majesty of the site itself. Though not officially one of Crete’s six palace, one could make a case for its inclusion, as there’s an area measuring 50 x 37 metres which closely mimics those at the palace sites. Finds from this site include so-called “snake goddesses”.

Ierapetra (Kales) Castle
Crete / Lasithi (Sitia)

Like Siteia castle, the fortifications here were originally set in place by Enrico Pescatore, in the early part of the 13th century, though almost everything visible nowadays is Venetian, or in the case of the garrison, Turkish. The fortifications form a perfect rectangle, with the walls running east to west, being 50 metres in length, and those running north to south, 25 metres long.

Ierapetra Museum
Crete / Lasithi (Sitia)

Ierapetra was an incredibly important site, especially during the Hellenistic and Roman periods (323 BC to 395AD), and this museum reflects that. It also has a rather impressive array of Minoan and post-Minoan artefacts as well, including a clay burial chest, known as a larnax, figures and vases dating back to the 8th and 9th centuries BC, and some rather impressive statues. There is also the obligatory coin collection, which is as impressive as you’d expect given that Ierapetra is known to have minted 44 different coins

Keramos Monastery
Crete / Lasithi (Sitia)

Worth a visit, though sadly deserted these days, Keramos monastery dates back to the late 17th century, a time when the Ottomans had wrested control of Crete from the Venetians. It was abandoned at the end of the 19th century.

Monastery of Aghios Georgios
Crete / Lasithi (Sitia)

Situated next to the national road, a monastery has existed here since Byzantine times, though what we see here, was founded in 1961, on the site of another monastery, abandoned in the 19th century. If you look across to the mountain opposite, you’ll see a wooden cross, which marks the spot at which hermits have lived and died for centuries.

Monastery of Areti
Crete / Lasithi (Sitia)

Found close to the village of Phourni, some 18 Kms distance from Aghios Nikolaos, Areti is a large, impressive monastery, with resident monks, making bread, olive oil and wine. The monastery is dedicated to Aghia Triadha (Holy Trinity), and its chapel to Aghios Lazarus. The water cisterns seen here, are somewhat necessary, as the area lacks springs or wells.

Panaghia Kera at Kritsa
Crete / Lasithi (Sitia)

A kilometre east of the beautiful village of Kritsa, lies the three-aisled church of Panaghia (“All Holy”, a name often given to the Virgin Mary) Kera. Many 14th century frescoes can be found in the central nave, but the most famous icon here is actually an 18th century copy of one that was painted far earlier, and stolen in 1498. The central aisle is the oldest, and is dedicated to the dormition of the Virgin Mary, its dome has four separate depictions from the gospels, when more ordinarily one would expect God to be beaming down upon one. The north aisle – dedicated to St. Antony – and the south aisle – dedicated to Saint Anna – were later additions to the church. Some of the original frescoes have been restored from their originals, which were sadly destroyed by fire.

Psychro Cave (Diktaeon Andron)
Crete / Lasithi (Sitia)

In Greek mythology, this is the spot where the great god Zeus was supposed to have been born (though some say that the more likely spot is at Petsofas on the east coast).

Siteia, Agios Nikolaos museum
Crete / Lasithi (Sitia)

This is where you’ll find one of the great artefacts on Crete, namely the ‘Palaikastro Kouros’. A chryselephantine (golden and ivory) statue of a young man, thought by many to be a depiction of the boy Zeus. This is worth visiting the museum for, alone, but alone it’s not. A fabulous array of materials from all over the east of Crete, include Linear A tablets, coins, double-headed axes, and even a dwarf-hippo’s jaw-bone. Please check before-hand to make sure that this museum is open, as it was undergoing structural repairs recently.

Spinalonga
Crete / Lasithi (Sitia)

Spinalonga, was connected to the mainland peninsular of Kolokytha, until the Venetians cut a channel on its southern flank, creating the island we see today.

Toplou Monastery
Crete / Lasithi (Sitia)

A splendidly situated site, some 16 KMs east of Siteia, and 12 Kms west of Palaikastro, Toplou is a lovely place to visit with amazing attractions.

Trapeza Cave
Crete / Lasithi (Sitia)

Sometimes called Cronos Cave, this cave can be found on the Lasithi plateau, near the village of Tzermiado, at an elevation of 660 metres. Bones found within have been dated back to neolithic times (pre 3,600 BC). An narrow entrance greets the visitor into a chamber, 185 metres long, with rocks of a green hue, once inside. The broken stalagmites and stalactites was caused by human hand.

Vigliotissa
Crete / Lasithi (Sitia)

Situated near the village of Vigli, close to Neapoli, there is an unsigned wall paintings here dating back to the 13th century. Whilst it is painted in the Byzantine tradition, the style is quite distinctive, especially the one of the Epitaphios, which depicts the Virgin Mary bending over Christ’s body, whilst Mary Magdalene mourns by his side. The church is self is cruciform-shaped, without a dome, and dates back to 1605, according to an inscription. One may need directions from locals to find the church, as it lies at the end of a dirt track.

Gournia, Pacheia Ammos, Ierapetra
Crete / Lasithi (Sitia)

Dating back to the EMIII period (around 2100 BC), the town of Gournia continued to be settled through to the late 13th C. BC, with occasional interruptions. It is a remarkably well-preserved site, and has been dubbed the “Pompeii of Crete”. Situated by the coast, equidistant between the Aghios Nikolaos and the village of Mochlos, it was first excavated by the American archaeologist, Harriet Boyd, at the beginning of the 20th century, It’s a lovely place to visit, both for its setting and the majesty of the site itself. Though not officially one of Crete’s six palace, one could make a case for its inclusion, as there’s an area measuring 50 x 37 metres which closely mimics those at the palace sites. Finds from this site include so-called “snake goddesses”.

Castle of Siteia
Crete / Lasithi (Sitia)

The castle of Siteia is mostly in ruins now, with the exception of a double-storied tower, with round look out points. It is well worth visiting, however, and lies on a hill looking over the pleasant seaside town of the same name. The original castle, built by the Genoese “pirate”, Enrico Pescatore, in the early 13th century, was closer to the sea, but this was destroyed by a couple of earthquakes and raids by the corsair, Hairedin Barbarossa, in the 1530s. The Venetians decided that the new castle needed to be higher up the hill if it were to withstand further attacks, but within a few years Siteia and its castle were in the hands of the Ottoman Turks, who did not rebuild it.

Ierapetra (Kales) Castle
Crete / Lasithi (Sitia)

Like Siteia castle, the fortifications here were originally set in place by Enrico Pescatore, in the early part of the 13th century, though almost everything visible nowadays is Venetian, or in the case of the garrison, Turkish. The fortifications form a perfect rectangle, with the walls running east to west, being 50 metres in length, and those running north to south, 25 metres long.

Spinalonga
Crete / Lasithi (Sitia)

Spinalonga, was connected to the mainland peninsular of Kolokytha, until the Venetians cut a channel on its southern flank, creating the island we see today.

Psychro Cave (Diktaeon Andron)
Crete / Lasithi (Sitia)

In Greek mythology, this is the spot where the great god Zeus was supposed to have been born (though some say that the more likely spot is at Petsofas on the east coast).

Trapeza Cave
Crete / Lasithi (Sitia)

Sometimes called Cronos Cave, this cave can be found on the Lasithi plateau, near the village of Tzermiado, at an elevation of 660 metres. Bones found within have been dated back to neolithic times (pre 3,600 BC). An narrow entrance greets the visitor into a chamber, 185 metres long, with rocks of a green hue, once inside. The broken stalagmites and stalactites was caused by human hand.

Aghios Konstantinos Monastery, Dories
Crete / Lasithi (Sitia)

Look at the few aged icons, including one of Theotokos from the 14th century and a fine example of the style known as Hodeghitiria, usually associated with Constantinople. This is a sign that the Cretan school of iconography was borrowing ideas from all over. The belfry is late 19th century, and dates to just before the monastery was disolved (1900).

Keramos Monastery
Crete / Lasithi (Sitia)

Worth a visit, though sadly deserted these days, Keramos monastery dates back to the late 17th century, a time when the Ottomans had wrested control of Crete from the Venetians. It was abandoned at the end of the 19th century.

Monastery of Aghios Georgios
Crete / Lasithi (Sitia)

Situated next to the national road, a monastery has existed here since Byzantine times, though what we see here, was founded in 1961, on the site of another monastery, abandoned in the 19th century. If you look across to the mountain opposite, you’ll see a wooden cross, which marks the spot at which hermits have lived and died for centuries.

Monastery of Areti
Crete / Lasithi (Sitia)

Found close to the village of Phourni, some 18 Kms distance from Aghios Nikolaos, Areti is a large, impressive monastery, with resident monks, making bread, olive oil and wine. The monastery is dedicated to Aghia Triadha (Holy Trinity), and its chapel to Aghios Lazarus. The water cisterns seen here, are somewhat necessary, as the area lacks springs or wells.

Panaghia Kera at Kritsa
Crete / Lasithi (Sitia)

A kilometre east of the beautiful village of Kritsa, lies the three-aisled church of Panaghia (“All Holy”, a name often given to the Virgin Mary) Kera. Many 14th century frescoes can be found in the central nave, but the most famous icon here is actually an 18th century copy of one that was painted far earlier, and stolen in 1498. The central aisle is the oldest, and is dedicated to the dormition of the Virgin Mary, its dome has four separate depictions from the gospels, when more ordinarily one would expect God to be beaming down upon one. The north aisle – dedicated to St. Antony – and the south aisle – dedicated to Saint Anna – were later additions to the church. Some of the original frescoes have been restored from their originals, which were sadly destroyed by fire.

Toplou Monastery
Crete / Lasithi (Sitia)

A splendidly situated site, some 16 KMs east of Siteia, and 12 Kms west of Palaikastro, Toplou is a lovely place to visit with amazing attractions.

Vigliotissa
Crete / Lasithi (Sitia)

Situated near the village of Vigli, close to Neapoli, there is an unsigned wall paintings here dating back to the 13th century. Whilst it is painted in the Byzantine tradition, the style is quite distinctive, especially the one of the Epitaphios, which depicts the Virgin Mary bending over Christ’s body, whilst Mary Magdalene mourns by his side. The church is self is cruciform-shaped, without a dome, and dates back to 1605, according to an inscription. One may need directions from locals to find the church, as it lies at the end of a dirt track.

No Landmarks Found In This Destination. Please Check Other Attractions.
Aghios Nikolaos Archaeological Museum
Crete / Lasithi (Sitia)

Eight rooms, covering the period from Neolithic (Around 3,000BC) to Roman, including the so-called ‘Goddess of Myrtos’ jug, which is worth visiting the museum for, alone. There are also finds here from the palace of Mallia, Siteia and the area of Mirabello.

Ierapetra Museum
Crete / Lasithi (Sitia)

Ierapetra was an incredibly important site, especially during the Hellenistic and Roman periods (323 BC to 395AD), and this museum reflects that. It also has a rather impressive array of Minoan and post-Minoan artefacts as well, including a clay burial chest, known as a larnax, figures and vases dating back to the 8th and 9th centuries BC, and some rather impressive statues. There is also the obligatory coin collection, which is as impressive as you’d expect given that Ierapetra is known to have minted 44 different coins

Siteia, Agios Nikolaos museum
Crete / Lasithi (Sitia)

This is where you’ll find one of the great artefacts on Crete, namely the ‘Palaikastro Kouros’. A chryselephantine (golden and ivory) statue of a young man, thought by many to be a depiction of the boy Zeus. This is worth visiting the museum for, alone, but alone it’s not. A fabulous array of materials from all over the east of Crete, include Linear A tablets, coins, double-headed axes, and even a dwarf-hippo’s jaw-bone. Please check before-hand to make sure that this museum is open, as it was undergoing structural repairs recently.

Bramiana Lake
Crete / Lasithi (Sitia)

Nestling a few kilometres to the North West of Ierapetra in South East Crete sits the reservoir of Bramiana, one of Crete’s biggest wetlands. This Europa 2000 Nature Reserve, known primarily for its bird life, is also a botanical wonderland.

No Olive Mills Found In This Destination. Please Check Other Attractions.
Aghios Nikolaos Archaeological Museum
Crete / Lasithi (Sitia)

Eight rooms, covering the period from Neolithic (Around 3,000BC) to Roman, including the so-called ‘Goddess of Myrtos’ jug, which is worth visiting the museum for, alone. There are also finds here from the palace of Mallia, Siteia and the area of Mirabello.

Bramiana Lake
Crete / Lasithi (Sitia)

Nestling a few kilometres to the North West of Ierapetra in South East Crete sits the reservoir of Bramiana, one of Crete’s biggest wetlands. This Europa 2000 Nature Reserve, known primarily for its bird life, is also a botanical wonderland.

Gournia, Pacheia Ammos, Ierapetra
Crete / Lasithi (Sitia)

Dating back to the EMIII period (around 2100 BC), the town of Gournia continued to be settled through to the late 13th C. BC, with occasional interruptions. It is a remarkably well-preserved site, and has been dubbed the “Pompeii of Crete”. Situated by the coast, equidistant between the Aghios Nikolaos and the village of Mochlos, it was first excavated by the American archaeologist, Harriet Boyd, at the beginning of the 20th century, It’s a lovely place to visit, both for its setting and the majesty of the site itself. Though not officially one of Crete’s six palace, one could make a case for its inclusion, as there’s an area measuring 50 x 37 metres which closely mimics those at the palace sites. Finds from this site include so-called “snake goddesses”.

Ierapetra (Kales) Castle
Crete / Lasithi (Sitia)

Like Siteia castle, the fortifications here were originally set in place by Enrico Pescatore, in the early part of the 13th century, though almost everything visible nowadays is Venetian, or in the case of the garrison, Turkish. The fortifications form a perfect rectangle, with the walls running east to west, being 50 metres in length, and those running north to south, 25 metres long.

Monastery of Aghios Georgios
Crete / Lasithi (Sitia)

Situated next to the national road, a monastery has existed here since Byzantine times, though what we see here, was founded in 1961, on the site of another monastery, abandoned in the 19th century. If you look across to the mountain opposite, you’ll see a wooden cross, which marks the spot at which hermits have lived and died for centuries.

Panaghia Kera at Kritsa
Crete / Lasithi (Sitia)

A kilometre east of the beautiful village of Kritsa, lies the three-aisled church of Panaghia (“All Holy”, a name often given to the Virgin Mary) Kera. Many 14th century frescoes can be found in the central nave, but the most famous icon here is actually an 18th century copy of one that was painted far earlier, and stolen in 1498. The central aisle is the oldest, and is dedicated to the dormition of the Virgin Mary, its dome has four separate depictions from the gospels, when more ordinarily one would expect God to be beaming down upon one. The north aisle – dedicated to St. Antony – and the south aisle – dedicated to Saint Anna – were later additions to the church. Some of the original frescoes have been restored from their originals, which were sadly destroyed by fire.

Spinalonga
Crete / Lasithi (Sitia)

Spinalonga, was connected to the mainland peninsular of Kolokytha, until the Venetians cut a channel on its southern flank, creating the island we see today.

Toplou Monastery
Crete / Lasithi (Sitia)

A splendidly situated site, some 16 KMs east of Siteia, and 12 Kms west of Palaikastro, Toplou is a lovely place to visit with amazing attractions.

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