Attractions In Argolida

Explore The Attractions Of Argolida
Agios Dimitrios Karakala
Peloponnese / Argolida

In the municipality of Nea Tiryns, the Monastery of Agios Dimitrios Karakala originally dates from the 11th century, although it can look quite modern on the outside.

Agios Theodosios Monastery
Peloponnese / Argolida

The Monastery of Agios Theodosios in the Municipality of Midea dates from the 10th century, even if the structure built around it seems more recent. Midea also has the 12th century austere yet interesting Church of the Dormition of the Virgin.

Alieis
Peloponnese / Argolida

Also known as the Fishermen’s Citadel, part of Alies has sunk underwater. The walls were 186 meters long and 2.5 meters wide, reinforced with circular and square towers. The foundations of these walls and towers are from porous rock, while the top part is made with river stones, bricks and tiles. There was also a religious centre inside the citadel, with an altar from the 4th century BC and ruins from the 5th and 6th. Evidence of workshops and residences can also be seen at the site.

Ancient theatre
Peloponnese / Argolida

The municipality of Argos also features a theatre built by Polycleitus sometime towards the end of the 5th century BC. It held possibly up to 20,000 people in 83 rows, and is considered the biggest of ancient Greece.

Archaeological Museum of Argos
Peloponnese / Argolida

Discover collections from classical and prehistoric times from the area and beyond, dating from 2000 BC to 600 AD. Interesting finds from the Mycenaean and Neolithic periods (from 5000 to 1100 BC) are also on display, thanks to the efforts of the French Archaeological School and the American School of Classical Studies at Lerna.

Archaeological Museum of Epidaurus
Peloponnese / Argolida

While some of the sculptures originally here were moved to the National Archaeological Museum in Athens and replaced by plaster versions, there’s still a lot to see. The museum houses healing inscriptions, hymns and votive sculptures, as well as several architectural parts of monuments from the sanctuary of Asclepius.

Archaeological Museum of Mycenae
Peloponnese / Argolida

In the site of Mycenae itself, the museum unveils the life of the Mycenaeans and their burial customs. Curious findings from the graves are exhibited as well as objects from historical years and the Mycenaean civilization in general.

Archaeological Museum of Nauplion
Peloponnese / Argolida

Erected in 1713 by the Venetian Provider Sagredos, the museum features Mesolithic and Palaeolithic finds from as far back as 8000 BC. Some of these hail from the caves of Kefalari and Frachti and Kefalari, in addition to early Helladic finds from Asini, Tiryns and Berbati (2nd millennium BC.). There are also Mycenaean or late Helladic finds from different areas of the Peloponnese as well as from the Geometric era. Archaic and Roman finds are also in the museum, making it a very diverse one that is worth visiting.

Asini
Peloponnese / Argolida

Near the picturesque seaside village of Asini lies the archaeological site by the same name. It features many Mycenaean tombs (the Barbouna necropolis) among others. The tombs are also known as the Barbouna necropolis. The remains of settlements date from pre-Mycenaean, Mycenaean, Geometric, Archaic and Hellenistic times. The citadel or acropolis and walls with a large tower belong to the Hellenistic period, i.e. from the third century BC. It was rebuilt during the Byzantine era.

Aspis
Peloponnese / Argolida

Across from the Panagia Katakekrymmeni, lies a round, wide hill that is about 80 metres high, reaching the Charadros River. Once upon a time this hill featured an acropolis with towers, the remains of which can still be seen. The acropolis on Aspis may even be older than that of the nearby Larissa (not to be confused with the city of the same name in central Greece). Visitors to Aspis may see an underground route that is about 20 metres long, which might be a cistern or a basement mentioned in the writings of Pausanias in connection to Danae and the oppressor of ancient Argos, Perilaos.

Avgo Monastery
Peloponnese / Argolida

A relatively young monastery that looks quite mysterious is that of Avgo dating from the 17th century and perched against the cliffs in the municipality of Kranidi.

Ayia Moni
Peloponnese / Argolida

Between Nafplio and Epidaurus, there is the classical-looking Monastery of Ayia Moni from the 12th century. This beautiful old monastery has a clear water spring and a small textile workshop.

Ayii Anargiri
Peloponnese / Argolida

In the municipality of Hermione lies the Monastery of Ayii Anargiri from the 11th century. A venerable ecclesiastical community with very old brick ‘school-like’ buildings surrounding a church in the middle of the valley.

Bourtzi, Nafplio
Peloponnese / Argolida

Attractively obvious from the lovely town of Nafplion, this is a fortified little island in the town’s gulf built by the Venetians somewhere between 1390 and 1540. The architecture was updated during the renaissance period and eventually occupied by the Ottomans in 1715. In the 50s it actually functioned as a hotel. It can be reached by boats from the harbour of Nauplion, and sometimes hosts concerts.

Domaine Skouras, on the Argos-Pyrgelas road
Peloponnese / Argolida

Offering good value for money, some of these wines are done in small quantities while others have won awards. Many grapes and varieties from the Peloponnese.

Folklore Institution V. Papantoniou, Nauplio
Peloponnese / Argolida

This Institution has focused on the research, study and preservation of Peloponnesian culture – as well as Greek culture overall. Research results and scientific conclusions relating to culture are revealed at the institution.

Kalami Monastery
Peloponnese / Argolida

The Monastery of Kalami (Koimesis Theotokou) dates from the 15th century – even if it’s not initially obvious – and has a multi-roofed church set in an arcaded courtyard.

Katakekrimeni Portokalousa
Peloponnese / Argolida

Visit the Church of the Presentation of the Virgin Mary (Katakekrimeni-Portokalousa) tucked on the hillside near Argos.

Kazarma bridge
Peloponnese / Argolida

A bridge from the Mycenaean era has survived the test of time. The bridge of Kazarma lies 15 kilometres from Nafplio on the way to Epidaurus. Characterised by its more crude architecture and Cyclopean elements, the bridge is about 2,300 years old. It is still used today by the inhabitants of the area.

Kazarma Citadel
Peloponnese / Argolida

Serenely lying on a hill, the Kazarma Citadel or Acropolis is located on the 15th kilometre of the Nafplio-Epidaurus highway. The citadel boasts four circular towers and walls that are 2.5 meters wide and 5.2 meters high. It has a polygon shape and dates by some accounts from the fourth century BC! It was rebuilt however in Roman times, then in Byzantine times.

Koroniotis Winery, Panorama
Peloponnese / Argolida

This is a lovely boutique winery and a family-owned one, producing small quantities of good-quality wine using Agiorgitiko, Moschofilero and Assyrtiko grapes.

Larissa Acropolis
Peloponnese / Argolida

Not to be confused with the city by the same name, and lying at an elevation of almost 290 metres, Larissa represents the Acropolis of Argos. Not to be confused with the city by the same name, and lying at an elevation of almost 290 metres, Larissa represents the Acropolis of Argos, possibly named after the ancient Pelasgos’ daughter. Protecting the entrance to the plain of Argolis, this natural fort was not surprisingly used by the Romans, Byzantines, Franks, Venetians and Ottomans. There are four cisterns and a wall from more recent years around the acropolis, which used to be surrounded by older Cyclopean walls. This is where history and mythology start blending. An underground passage some 3,000 steps in length lies under Larissa, with two caves. The church of Agia Marina from 1859 AD was constructed on the remnants of the temple of Zeus of Larissa. Another church on the slopes of Larissa, that of Panagia Katakekrymmeni, is built near where the ancient temples of Athena Oxyderkis and Pythaeus Apollo are. The ancient sanctuary of Acraia Hera is also visible at Larissa, so the temple of Apollo, considered the first to be first built by Pythaeus of Delphi.

Laskarideio Folklore Museum of Nea Kios
Peloponnese / Argolida

Discover costumes and other articles related to silk, which is connected to the commercial wellbeing of the town in history, in addition to many other folklore items.

Melas Olive Oil Domain
Peloponnese / Argolida

Prepare yourself for an enchanting trip through the land of olive oil in the heart of the Peloponnese. A visit to Melas Olive-Oil Estate and its olive groves will amaze you and teach you all you need to know about this “green gold”.

Mycenae
Peloponnese / Argolida

Long before the ancient Greek philosophers and the battles of Athens and Sparta ever took place, more than a thousand years before these events, there was another powerful and intriguing civilization of Greece belonging to the Mycenaeans.

Palamidi
Peloponnese / Argolida

At 216 meters above sea level lies the majestic castle of Palamidi overlooking Nauplio. It was built by the Venetians during their second occupation of the area, i.e. between 1686 and 1715. This is a fine specimen of a baroque fortress, which was taken over by the Ottomans until 1822 before being liberated by the Greeks. Some of the walls have been restored, particularly the wall of the castle and some of the weaker parts. The castle is composed of eight bastions, surrounded by the walls. You can climb up using a long stairway. Also note the Church of Agios Andreas actually built within one of the bastions.

Papantonis Winery, Nemea
Peloponnese / Argolida

The fertile land near the village of Malandreni in the Nemea area produces great wines using the Agiorgitiko and Roditis varieties. Try the Meden Agan, Lysimelis and Metron Ariston wines.

Serapis
Peloponnese / Argolida

Near Argos lies a site to worship the Greek-Egyptian god Serapis established during Hellenistic times under the Ptolemaic dynasty. Considered the guardian of medicine and the saviour god, Serapis enjoyed popularity of the peoples in Argolis.

Taxiarches Monastery
Peloponnese / Argolida

In the Municipality of Epidaurus the Monastery of Taxiarches from the 15th century has an arcaded colonnade with medieval design surrounding a central church that looks more modern.

Temple of Asclepius
Peloponnese / Argolida

Also known as the temple of Asclepius, this site was a religious and curative centre (as revealed in the poems of Pindaros), an anceint holistic and spiritual centre. It used katakoimisis as a cure (sleeping until the god visited patients during sleep to reveal treatment) but the treatments evolved. The other important Aesculapium in Argolida is the temple of Epidaurus.

Tirintha
Peloponnese / Argolida

Visitors will marvel at the huge boulders that may remind British and Irish visitors of the Gaelic dolmens. Myth has it that the boulders were created by the Cyclops (Kiklopi in Greek). The cyclops were the only beings who could move them with their strength. Tirintha shows evidence of being inhabited since the Neolithic era, i.e. around 1400 BC when the outer walls were built (a full century before Mycenae). It was soon thereafter burnt down and rebuilt by the Dorians who invaded the area.

Tolo Medieval Castle
Peloponnese / Argolida

If you’re a fairly good swimmer, this is one fort that’s for you. It lies on an islet off the coast, ready to be explored. Head to Tolo with its clean beaches, although slightly touristy, but with a surprise in store for those who seek quite mystery. You can literally swim the calm waters to one of two close-by islets to explore the remains of a medieval castle left over from Frankish times.

Zoodochos Pigi, Kefalari
Peloponnese / Argolida

A visit to the Church of Zoodochos Pigi of Kefalari in the municipality of Argos, with its historic caves and springs, is a must.

Ancient theatre
Peloponnese / Argolida

The municipality of Argos also features a theatre built by Polycleitus sometime towards the end of the 5th century BC. It held possibly up to 20,000 people in 83 rows, and is considered the biggest of ancient Greece.

Archaeological Museum of Argos
Peloponnese / Argolida

Discover collections from classical and prehistoric times from the area and beyond, dating from 2000 BC to 600 AD. Interesting finds from the Mycenaean and Neolithic periods (from 5000 to 1100 BC) are also on display, thanks to the efforts of the French Archaeological School and the American School of Classical Studies at Lerna.

Archaeological Museum of Epidaurus
Peloponnese / Argolida

While some of the sculptures originally here were moved to the National Archaeological Museum in Athens and replaced by plaster versions, there’s still a lot to see. The museum houses healing inscriptions, hymns and votive sculptures, as well as several architectural parts of monuments from the sanctuary of Asclepius.

Archaeological Museum of Mycenae
Peloponnese / Argolida

In the site of Mycenae itself, the museum unveils the life of the Mycenaeans and their burial customs. Curious findings from the graves are exhibited as well as objects from historical years and the Mycenaean civilization in general.

Archaeological Museum of Nauplion
Peloponnese / Argolida

Erected in 1713 by the Venetian Provider Sagredos, the museum features Mesolithic and Palaeolithic finds from as far back as 8000 BC. Some of these hail from the caves of Kefalari and Frachti and Kefalari, in addition to early Helladic finds from Asini, Tiryns and Berbati (2nd millennium BC.). There are also Mycenaean or late Helladic finds from different areas of the Peloponnese as well as from the Geometric era. Archaic and Roman finds are also in the museum, making it a very diverse one that is worth visiting.

Asini
Peloponnese / Argolida

Near the picturesque seaside village of Asini lies the archaeological site by the same name. It features many Mycenaean tombs (the Barbouna necropolis) among others. The tombs are also known as the Barbouna necropolis. The remains of settlements date from pre-Mycenaean, Mycenaean, Geometric, Archaic and Hellenistic times. The citadel or acropolis and walls with a large tower belong to the Hellenistic period, i.e. from the third century BC. It was rebuilt during the Byzantine era.

Aspis
Peloponnese / Argolida

Across from the Panagia Katakekrymmeni, lies a round, wide hill that is about 80 metres high, reaching the Charadros River. Once upon a time this hill featured an acropolis with towers, the remains of which can still be seen. The acropolis on Aspis may even be older than that of the nearby Larissa (not to be confused with the city of the same name in central Greece). Visitors to Aspis may see an underground route that is about 20 metres long, which might be a cistern or a basement mentioned in the writings of Pausanias in connection to Danae and the oppressor of ancient Argos, Perilaos.

Larissa Acropolis
Peloponnese / Argolida

Not to be confused with the city by the same name, and lying at an elevation of almost 290 metres, Larissa represents the Acropolis of Argos. Not to be confused with the city by the same name, and lying at an elevation of almost 290 metres, Larissa represents the Acropolis of Argos, possibly named after the ancient Pelasgos’ daughter. Protecting the entrance to the plain of Argolis, this natural fort was not surprisingly used by the Romans, Byzantines, Franks, Venetians and Ottomans. There are four cisterns and a wall from more recent years around the acropolis, which used to be surrounded by older Cyclopean walls. This is where history and mythology start blending. An underground passage some 3,000 steps in length lies under Larissa, with two caves. The church of Agia Marina from 1859 AD was constructed on the remnants of the temple of Zeus of Larissa. Another church on the slopes of Larissa, that of Panagia Katakekrymmeni, is built near where the ancient temples of Athena Oxyderkis and Pythaeus Apollo are. The ancient sanctuary of Acraia Hera is also visible at Larissa, so the temple of Apollo, considered the first to be first built by Pythaeus of Delphi.

Mycenae
Peloponnese / Argolida

Long before the ancient Greek philosophers and the battles of Athens and Sparta ever took place, more than a thousand years before these events, there was another powerful and intriguing civilization of Greece belonging to the Mycenaeans.

Serapis
Peloponnese / Argolida

Near Argos lies a site to worship the Greek-Egyptian god Serapis established during Hellenistic times under the Ptolemaic dynasty. Considered the guardian of medicine and the saviour god, Serapis enjoyed popularity of the peoples in Argolis.

Temple of Asclepius
Peloponnese / Argolida

Also known as the temple of Asclepius, this site was a religious and curative centre (as revealed in the poems of Pindaros), an anceint holistic and spiritual centre. It used katakoimisis as a cure (sleeping until the god visited patients during sleep to reveal treatment) but the treatments evolved. The other important Aesculapium in Argolida is the temple of Epidaurus.

Tirintha
Peloponnese / Argolida

Visitors will marvel at the huge boulders that may remind British and Irish visitors of the Gaelic dolmens. Myth has it that the boulders were created by the Cyclops (Kiklopi in Greek). The cyclops were the only beings who could move them with their strength. Tirintha shows evidence of being inhabited since the Neolithic era, i.e. around 1400 BC when the outer walls were built (a full century before Mycenae). It was soon thereafter burnt down and rebuilt by the Dorians who invaded the area.

Alieis
Peloponnese / Argolida

Also known as the Fishermen’s Citadel, part of Alies has sunk underwater. The walls were 186 meters long and 2.5 meters wide, reinforced with circular and square towers. The foundations of these walls and towers are from porous rock, while the top part is made with river stones, bricks and tiles. There was also a religious centre inside the citadel, with an altar from the 4th century BC and ruins from the 5th and 6th. Evidence of workshops and residences can also be seen at the site.

Bourtzi, Nafplio
Peloponnese / Argolida

Attractively obvious from the lovely town of Nafplion, this is a fortified little island in the town’s gulf built by the Venetians somewhere between 1390 and 1540. The architecture was updated during the renaissance period and eventually occupied by the Ottomans in 1715. In the 50s it actually functioned as a hotel. It can be reached by boats from the harbour of Nauplion, and sometimes hosts concerts.

Kazarma Citadel
Peloponnese / Argolida

Serenely lying on a hill, the Kazarma Citadel or Acropolis is located on the 15th kilometre of the Nafplio-Epidaurus highway. The citadel boasts four circular towers and walls that are 2.5 meters wide and 5.2 meters high. It has a polygon shape and dates by some accounts from the fourth century BC! It was rebuilt however in Roman times, then in Byzantine times.

Larissa Acropolis
Peloponnese / Argolida

Not to be confused with the city by the same name, and lying at an elevation of almost 290 metres, Larissa represents the Acropolis of Argos. Not to be confused with the city by the same name, and lying at an elevation of almost 290 metres, Larissa represents the Acropolis of Argos, possibly named after the ancient Pelasgos’ daughter. Protecting the entrance to the plain of Argolis, this natural fort was not surprisingly used by the Romans, Byzantines, Franks, Venetians and Ottomans. There are four cisterns and a wall from more recent years around the acropolis, which used to be surrounded by older Cyclopean walls. This is where history and mythology start blending. An underground passage some 3,000 steps in length lies under Larissa, with two caves. The church of Agia Marina from 1859 AD was constructed on the remnants of the temple of Zeus of Larissa. Another church on the slopes of Larissa, that of Panagia Katakekrymmeni, is built near where the ancient temples of Athena Oxyderkis and Pythaeus Apollo are. The ancient sanctuary of Acraia Hera is also visible at Larissa, so the temple of Apollo, considered the first to be first built by Pythaeus of Delphi.

Palamidi
Peloponnese / Argolida

At 216 meters above sea level lies the majestic castle of Palamidi overlooking Nauplio. It was built by the Venetians during their second occupation of the area, i.e. between 1686 and 1715. This is a fine specimen of a baroque fortress, which was taken over by the Ottomans until 1822 before being liberated by the Greeks. Some of the walls have been restored, particularly the wall of the castle and some of the weaker parts. The castle is composed of eight bastions, surrounded by the walls. You can climb up using a long stairway. Also note the Church of Agios Andreas actually built within one of the bastions.

Tolo Medieval Castle
Peloponnese / Argolida

If you’re a fairly good swimmer, this is one fort that’s for you. It lies on an islet off the coast, ready to be explored. Head to Tolo with its clean beaches, although slightly touristy, but with a surprise in store for those who seek quite mystery. You can literally swim the calm waters to one of two close-by islets to explore the remains of a medieval castle left over from Frankish times.

No Caves Found In This Destination. Please Check Other Attractions.
Agios Dimitrios Karakala
Peloponnese / Argolida

In the municipality of Nea Tiryns, the Monastery of Agios Dimitrios Karakala originally dates from the 11th century, although it can look quite modern on the outside.

Agios Theodosios Monastery
Peloponnese / Argolida

The Monastery of Agios Theodosios in the Municipality of Midea dates from the 10th century, even if the structure built around it seems more recent. Midea also has the 12th century austere yet interesting Church of the Dormition of the Virgin.

Avgo Monastery
Peloponnese / Argolida

A relatively young monastery that looks quite mysterious is that of Avgo dating from the 17th century and perched against the cliffs in the municipality of Kranidi.

Ayia Moni
Peloponnese / Argolida

Between Nafplio and Epidaurus, there is the classical-looking Monastery of Ayia Moni from the 12th century. This beautiful old monastery has a clear water spring and a small textile workshop.

Ayii Anargiri
Peloponnese / Argolida

In the municipality of Hermione lies the Monastery of Ayii Anargiri from the 11th century. A venerable ecclesiastical community with very old brick ‘school-like’ buildings surrounding a church in the middle of the valley.

Kalami Monastery
Peloponnese / Argolida

The Monastery of Kalami (Koimesis Theotokou) dates from the 15th century – even if it’s not initially obvious – and has a multi-roofed church set in an arcaded courtyard.

Katakekrimeni Portokalousa
Peloponnese / Argolida

Visit the Church of the Presentation of the Virgin Mary (Katakekrimeni-Portokalousa) tucked on the hillside near Argos.

Taxiarches Monastery
Peloponnese / Argolida

In the Municipality of Epidaurus the Monastery of Taxiarches from the 15th century has an arcaded colonnade with medieval design surrounding a central church that looks more modern.

Zoodochos Pigi, Kefalari
Peloponnese / Argolida

A visit to the Church of Zoodochos Pigi of Kefalari in the municipality of Argos, with its historic caves and springs, is a must.

Kazarma bridge
Peloponnese / Argolida

A bridge from the Mycenaean era has survived the test of time. The bridge of Kazarma lies 15 kilometres from Nafplio on the way to Epidaurus. Characterised by its more crude architecture and Cyclopean elements, the bridge is about 2,300 years old. It is still used today by the inhabitants of the area.

Archaeological Museum of Argos
Peloponnese / Argolida

Discover collections from classical and prehistoric times from the area and beyond, dating from 2000 BC to 600 AD. Interesting finds from the Mycenaean and Neolithic periods (from 5000 to 1100 BC) are also on display, thanks to the efforts of the French Archaeological School and the American School of Classical Studies at Lerna.

Archaeological Museum of Epidaurus
Peloponnese / Argolida

While some of the sculptures originally here were moved to the National Archaeological Museum in Athens and replaced by plaster versions, there’s still a lot to see. The museum houses healing inscriptions, hymns and votive sculptures, as well as several architectural parts of monuments from the sanctuary of Asclepius.

Archaeological Museum of Mycenae
Peloponnese / Argolida

In the site of Mycenae itself, the museum unveils the life of the Mycenaeans and their burial customs. Curious findings from the graves are exhibited as well as objects from historical years and the Mycenaean civilization in general.

Archaeological Museum of Nauplion
Peloponnese / Argolida

Erected in 1713 by the Venetian Provider Sagredos, the museum features Mesolithic and Palaeolithic finds from as far back as 8000 BC. Some of these hail from the caves of Kefalari and Frachti and Kefalari, in addition to early Helladic finds from Asini, Tiryns and Berbati (2nd millennium BC.). There are also Mycenaean or late Helladic finds from different areas of the Peloponnese as well as from the Geometric era. Archaic and Roman finds are also in the museum, making it a very diverse one that is worth visiting.

Folklore Institution V. Papantoniou, Nauplio
Peloponnese / Argolida

This Institution has focused on the research, study and preservation of Peloponnesian culture – as well as Greek culture overall. Research results and scientific conclusions relating to culture are revealed at the institution.

Laskarideio Folklore Museum of Nea Kios
Peloponnese / Argolida

Discover costumes and other articles related to silk, which is connected to the commercial wellbeing of the town in history, in addition to many other folklore items.

No Nature & Flora Found In This Destination. Please Check Other Attractions.
Melas Olive Oil Domain
Peloponnese / Argolida

Prepare yourself for an enchanting trip through the land of olive oil in the heart of the Peloponnese. A visit to Melas Olive-Oil Estate and its olive groves will amaze you and teach you all you need to know about this “green gold”.

Alieis
Peloponnese / Argolida

Also known as the Fishermen’s Citadel, part of Alies has sunk underwater. The walls were 186 meters long and 2.5 meters wide, reinforced with circular and square towers. The foundations of these walls and towers are from porous rock, while the top part is made with river stones, bricks and tiles. There was also a religious centre inside the citadel, with an altar from the 4th century BC and ruins from the 5th and 6th. Evidence of workshops and residences can also be seen at the site.

Archaeological Museum of Epidaurus
Peloponnese / Argolida

While some of the sculptures originally here were moved to the National Archaeological Museum in Athens and replaced by plaster versions, there’s still a lot to see. The museum houses healing inscriptions, hymns and votive sculptures, as well as several architectural parts of monuments from the sanctuary of Asclepius.

Avgo Monastery
Peloponnese / Argolida

A relatively young monastery that looks quite mysterious is that of Avgo dating from the 17th century and perched against the cliffs in the municipality of Kranidi.

Bourtzi, Nafplio
Peloponnese / Argolida

Attractively obvious from the lovely town of Nafplion, this is a fortified little island in the town’s gulf built by the Venetians somewhere between 1390 and 1540. The architecture was updated during the renaissance period and eventually occupied by the Ottomans in 1715. In the 50s it actually functioned as a hotel. It can be reached by boats from the harbour of Nauplion, and sometimes hosts concerts.

Folklore Institution V. Papantoniou, Nauplio
Peloponnese / Argolida

This Institution has focused on the research, study and preservation of Peloponnesian culture – as well as Greek culture overall. Research results and scientific conclusions relating to culture are revealed at the institution.

Kazarma bridge
Peloponnese / Argolida

A bridge from the Mycenaean era has survived the test of time. The bridge of Kazarma lies 15 kilometres from Nafplio on the way to Epidaurus. Characterised by its more crude architecture and Cyclopean elements, the bridge is about 2,300 years old. It is still used today by the inhabitants of the area.

Larissa Acropolis
Peloponnese / Argolida

Not to be confused with the city by the same name, and lying at an elevation of almost 290 metres, Larissa represents the Acropolis of Argos. Not to be confused with the city by the same name, and lying at an elevation of almost 290 metres, Larissa represents the Acropolis of Argos, possibly named after the ancient Pelasgos’ daughter. Protecting the entrance to the plain of Argolis, this natural fort was not surprisingly used by the Romans, Byzantines, Franks, Venetians and Ottomans. There are four cisterns and a wall from more recent years around the acropolis, which used to be surrounded by older Cyclopean walls. This is where history and mythology start blending. An underground passage some 3,000 steps in length lies under Larissa, with two caves. The church of Agia Marina from 1859 AD was constructed on the remnants of the temple of Zeus of Larissa. Another church on the slopes of Larissa, that of Panagia Katakekrymmeni, is built near where the ancient temples of Athena Oxyderkis and Pythaeus Apollo are. The ancient sanctuary of Acraia Hera is also visible at Larissa, so the temple of Apollo, considered the first to be first built by Pythaeus of Delphi.

Melas Olive Oil Domain
Peloponnese / Argolida

Prepare yourself for an enchanting trip through the land of olive oil in the heart of the Peloponnese. A visit to Melas Olive-Oil Estate and its olive groves will amaze you and teach you all you need to know about this “green gold”.

Mycenae
Peloponnese / Argolida

Long before the ancient Greek philosophers and the battles of Athens and Sparta ever took place, more than a thousand years before these events, there was another powerful and intriguing civilization of Greece belonging to the Mycenaeans.

Papantonis Winery, Nemea
Peloponnese / Argolida

The fertile land near the village of Malandreni in the Nemea area produces great wines using the Agiorgitiko and Roditis varieties. Try the Meden Agan, Lysimelis and Metron Ariston wines.

Zoodochos Pigi, Kefalari
Peloponnese / Argolida

A visit to the Church of Zoodochos Pigi of Kefalari in the municipality of Argos, with its historic caves and springs, is a must.

No Wildlife & Fauna Found In This Destination. Please Check Other Attractions.
Domaine Skouras, on the Argos-Pyrgelas road
Peloponnese / Argolida

Offering good value for money, some of these wines are done in small quantities while others have won awards. Many grapes and varieties from the Peloponnese.

Koroniotis Winery, Panorama
Peloponnese / Argolida

This is a lovely boutique winery and a family-owned one, producing small quantities of good-quality wine using Agiorgitiko, Moschofilero and Assyrtiko grapes.

Papantonis Winery, Nemea
Peloponnese / Argolida

The fertile land near the village of Malandreni in the Nemea area produces great wines using the Agiorgitiko and Roditis varieties. Try the Meden Agan, Lysimelis and Metron Ariston wines.