Attractions In Achaia

Explore The Attractions Of Achaia
Achaia Clauss
Peloponnese / Achaia

A must-visit winery is Achaia-Clauss with its stone buildings and large oak barrels, only 8 kilometres outside the city in green surroundings. The winery was built by the Bavarian Gustav Clauss in 1854 that is today known for its excellent wine. There are daily wine tours in the facility.

Agios Nikolaos, Platani
Peloponnese / Achaia

Lying at the northern foothills of the Panahaikos mountain range and beside the Xylokera stream, the church of Agios Nikolaos functioned as an old monastery according to Venetian records of the 17th century. It has since undergone many repairs.

Aliki/Egio
Peloponnese / Achaia

The beach of Aliki in Egio, despite being a formal beach, is also an important aquatic ecosystem and partly a lagoon, lying to the northeast of the beach. There are about 120 bird species that visit plus significant aquatic life. The rich flora of the area is also noteworthy.

Ancient Aigeira
Peloponnese / Achaia

Ancient travel writer Pausanias wrote about a temple dedicated to Artemis and one dedicated to Apollon, as well as statues of Agamemnon, Ifigeneia, Athena, Asclepius of Serapis and Isis.

Ancient Dymi and Olenos
Peloponnese / Achaia

Mystery had shrouded the true position of Dymi (also Dyme or Dimi) for some time, which in ancient literature was always paired with Olenos, both reputedly established some 4000 years ago. The Byzantines also had conflicting information about it.

Ancient Eliki
Peloponnese / Achaia

Known also as Helike, this ancient city near Aegio and the Selinus river lies today in the Municipality of Diakopto, where the idyllic village of Eliki is today. The old settlement was apparently destroyed by an earthquake and subsequent tsunami, with much ruins having sunk into the sea. Many ancients such as Siculus, Homer, Marcus Aurelius and of course Pausanias have referred to the city in their writings. The Temple of Elikonian Poseidon and others were noted at the site, which was officially discovered by archaeologists only in 2001. The site unveils evidence of destroyed buildings from the Classical era, as well as parts of the coastal Roman highway. Excavations of Eliki are also ongoing in the nearby village of Rizomylos.

Ancient Keryneia
Peloponnese / Achaia

Thanks to the efforts of the English Archaeological School, the move to unearth monuments from the Hellenistic era as well as a cemetery belonging to this ancient city have shed light on the site of Keryneia.

Ancient Kleitora and Azania
Peloponnese / Achaia

In Ano Kleitoria near the town of Lefkasi there are remains of the city of Azania. There is little remaining of the ancient walls surrounding the city, but relatively recently parts of the ancient theatre and more fortifications have emerged.

Ancient Klitoras in Klitoria
Peloponnese / Achaia

Once a thriving city with over 60,000 people and one of the first to be established, all that is left of Klitoras now are parts of walls, a theatre and a few buildings from Hellenistic and Roman times.

Ancient Lousoi
Peloponnese / Achaia

It was the Austrian Archaeological Institute and its work around this site that have revealed the remains of an important Arcadian city, lying in the Municipality of Kalavrita in the village of Soudena or Lousoi. Notable among the finds is the Temple of Artemis, dating back from the third century BC. Remains of the parliament, entrance and fountain, as well as a notable house with its courtyard are also visible. The location of the acropolis has also been determined, but not yet excavated.

Ancient Odeion of Patras
Peloponnese / Achaia

The Odeion of Patras was constructed just before that of Herod Atticus in Athens, in 161 AD. Twelve rows of seats render this theatre impressive, along with the wall of its stage, stairways, parapet and more. It was unearthed only in 1889 and redressed in marble to host many concerts and shows in summer.

Ancient Tritea in Kalentzi
Peloponnese / Achaia

Another member of the Achaian Cities, Tritea reached its zenith in the 3rd century BC, although little evidence remains. Around Vassilikos there are parts of an ancient building known as Palioklissi, while on Palataki hill there’s an underground building.

Ancient Vura, Egio
Peloponnese / Achaia

Lying over modern Egio (or Aegio) is Vura, which flourished after Eliki was destroyed. It was initially established by the Pelasgians who were followed by the Ionians. In 146 AD it fell under the Roman empire. Eventually the Byzantines, Franks Venetians and Ottomans all passed through. Not much remains form antiquity, but there are a couple of structures from the 4th and 5th century BC near the water tank and a cemetery from the Classical era, and Mycenaean tombs. Remains from an ancient theatre, some walls, temples and statues are also evident. The church of Agia Triada was built on remains of a temple, probably dedicated to the goddess Earth. Interestingly, a plane tree by the coast seems to be the same one Pausanias talked about in his travels.

Castle of Oria (or Salmeniko)
Peloponnese / Achaia

Built sometime between 1280 and 1310, the remains of this castle on the outskirts of Kalavrita lie at an altitude of 1100 meters, surrounded by many legends and wars. Supposedly, Aikaterini Palaiologou, one of the few remaining notables of the Byzantine dynasty, leapt to her death in 1463 from the castle to avoid capture from the Ottoman Turks. In a twist of fate some 360 years later in 1821, the Greeks fired the first cannon against the Ottoman occupation towards its end. Today, only some ruins and part of a gate can be seen, but the place is still enchanting.

Cave of Hercules, Eleonas
Peloponnese / Achaia

Above the popular Eleonas beach and tourists on a mountain lies the cave of Hercules. Greek travel writer Pausanias in Roman times reveals that the cave hid a statue of Hercules, giving the exact directions of how to get there (descend from the ancient city of Vura and head to the coast by the river Vuraikos).

Church of Agios Dimitrios in Dimi
Peloponnese / Achaia

Built during the 12th century, this church functioned as a school during Ottoman rule.

Church of Panagia Tripiti In Egio
Peloponnese / Achaia

Carved into rock above the coastal road, the church of Panagia Tripiti is surrounded with miracle giving. Supposedly a castaway lost at sea found his way when he saw a light through a hole in the rock. He headed towards it and found an image painted by Luke the evangelist.

Church of Theotokou, Farrai
Peloponnese / Achaia

Built at around 1400 AD, this is a Byzantine-type church that still carries the mystery and charm of Byzantine spirituality within its walls.

Doxapatri Tower, Skiada
Peloponnese / Achaia

In Skiada the ancient Tower of a Byzantine general, Doxapatri, has escaped destruction, whereas further south lie the scanty ruins of the castle of Paleologos.

English Church, Patras
Peloponnese / Achaia

Surprisingly, the English have their own grand protestant church in Patras, built in 1878, established with the support of the wealthy British society living in the city at the time. The neo-gothic style is architecturally interesting, while the church has been used on some occasions as an exhibition hall.

Folk Art Museum of Patras
Peloponnese / Achaia

The Folk Art Museum is housed in one of the more venerable buildings in the famed Skagiopouleio neighbourhood known for its wartime orphanage. Embark on a trip into Greek city and country life of decades past, with a vigorous mix of folkloric items that unveil a totally different era in this part of the world.

Fortress at Rio
Peloponnese / Achaia

This fortress has had an illustrious history and changed hands many times: Ottoman Sultan Bayezit II built the initial fortification at Rio in 1499. It fell to the Spaniards in 1532, but was then reclaimed by the Ottomans. In 1603 the Knights of Malta destroyed parts of it, before the fort was taken over by Venetian nobleman and warlord Francesco Morosini. The latter added new bastions, towers and ramparts, only to have it seized again by the Ottomans in 1715. They eventually surrendered in 1828 to French revolutionist General Nicolas Joseph Maison at the end of the Greek revolution.

Fortress of Patras
Peloponnese / Achaia

The castle-fortress of Patras was built in the 6th century A.D. by Justinian where an ancient acropolis once stood. The castle repelled the Slavs, Saracens and even Normans who surrounded the city and helped thwart the invasion of the Peloponnese.

Historical-Ethnological Museum of Patras
Peloponnese / Achaia

This museum features rare editions of books, newspapers as far back as 1875, historic magazines and valuable documents. The latter includes the first address of the 3rd National Assembly of the Greeks, sent in 1827 to Ioannis Kapodistrias, the country’s prime minister, just as Patras was gaining its independence.

Kalamia Forest
Peloponnese / Achaia

Close to Akrata, the forest of Kalamia has some splendid oak trees representing one of the officially protected areas in the country. Fauna and flora abound in this extended green area, making it ideal for nature lovers. Nearby is the village of Mesourgi, which depends on agriculture (vegetables, fruits, olives).

Klokos, Barbas & Selinountas
Peloponnese / Achaia

Two opposing mountains, Klokos and Barbas are separated by Selinountas gorge or ravine, and considered a region of European Natural Heritage, as well as part of the Natura 2000 network. Alpine-like meadows dot the mountains at higher elevations above the tree line. Fir tree forests existed in both, though unfortunately the forests of Klokos burnt down. Luckily that of Barbas was untouched by the fire. Oak forests are also present on these two mountains, but systematic lumbering is threatening them. The Selinoudas valley was also home to pine woods which were almost totally burnt by the fires as well. Among the valley’s bushes there are many wild animals that seek shelter. This used to be a valuable shelter for many species including the Golden Eagle and Golden Falcon, as well as mammals like the Bidra civet. The area is considered an ecologically protected one, so care must be taken when visiting.

Kotychi Lagoon
Peloponnese / Achaia

Also known as Neofytos, the brackish Kotychi lagoon lies near the cape of Kyllini, covering 800 hectares and now considered the largest lagoon in the Peloponnese. Fed by fresh-water streams, its level fluctuates significantly and is a very important resting point for migrating birds.

Ladonas River & Aroanio Springs, Klitoria
Peloponnese / Achaia

The Ladonas river links Achaia with Arkadia, and is one of the most ancient in the Peloponnese. The river, associated with the dragon, is known for snaking its way along 60 kilometres of greenery and nature, a place where the old gods battled each other.

Lake Tsivlou
Peloponnese / Achaia

The magnificently bluish-green Tsivlou lake near Akrata lies a good 800 meters above sea level, considered very important for the local ecology and culture. Curiously, the lake was formed in 1913 after landfalls and resulting blockage of the Krathis river.

Monastery of Agia Lavra
Peloponnese / Achaia

Destroyed by Ottoman tyrant Ibrahim Pasha, the Monastery of Agia Lavra was built twice and then moved lower down in 1689 to where it stands today. Rare icons, sacred vessels and important archives can all be seen here.

Monastery of Agia Triada near Akrata
Peloponnese / Achaia

Just three kilometres away from Akrata lies the monastery of Agia Triada, built in the 16th century. It boasts some beautiful murals painted sometime around the mid 18th century. Saintly relics, rare heirlooms including a gospel from 1672 and a venerable spirit overall can all be seen or experienced here.

Monastery of Agia Triada, Vorous
Peloponnese / Achaia

Built over the remains of an ancient temple dedicated to the goddess Earth, the now-deserted monastery of Agia Triada (Holy Trinity) was probably established in the 14th century.

Monastery of Agii Pantes
Peloponnese / Achaia

Built by the monk Nectarius – reputed as a skilled miracle worker – between 1715 and 1728, the monastery had special ties with the famous monastery of Saint Catherine in Egypt’s Sinai. Supposedly the monastery was protected by order of the sultan with special requests from the monks in Sinai.

Monastery of Chrysopodaritissa
Peloponnese / Achaia

Set in nature between Kalanos and Kalanistra in Farrai, the monastery of Holy Mary with a Golden Leg, as it translates, helps those in need through miracles. Many believe it cures the ailing leg of a believer. The place was often visited by the eparch Palaion Patron Germanos during the Greek revolution.

Monastery of Megalo Spileo
Peloponnese / Achaia

Meaning “Monastery of the Big Cave”, this 8-floor centre of worship was carved into the mountain and built at a height of 924 meters. It was originally built by two monks in the 4th century AD, and contains different icons such as Panagia Chrysospiliotissa as well as a special icon by the evangelist Luke. The latter is made of wax, mastic gum and perfume. Valuable manuscripts from the 17th century and captivating murals are also on display. The Monastery was actually destroyed five times since its inception, the most recent being by the Nazis in 1943. There’s a path from the monastery leading up to the cliffs where remains of a castle and some canons can be seen.

Monastery of Panagia Makellaria
Peloponnese / Achaia

On the river of the Selinountas not far from Lapanagi village(Municipality of Kalavrita) this monastery was said to be built by Emperor Justinian. Highly prized is the icon of the Mother of God that – somewhat reminiscent of the Mona Lisa – is supposed to look at you wherever you’re seated in the church.

Monastery of Panagia Pepelenitsa
Peloponnese / Achaia

Located near the village of Kounina/Aegialia across from the Monastery of Taxiarches, controversy surrounds the establishment of this monastery. Building was either undertaken by Elena Palaiologina, wife of emperor Emmanuel Palaiologos, or by Bebel Helenitsa, daughter of Achaian priest Thomas Palaiologos.

Monastery of Taxiarches near Egio
Peloponnese / Achaia

Rising above the Selinounta river barely a few kilometres from Egio, the Monastery of the Taxiarchs boasts a rich library and was founded in 1415. It was destroyed and rebuilt several times since then. Across the river there’s the female Monastery of Pepelenitsa. It is a male-only monastery.

Monastery of Vlasia
Peloponnese / Achaia

Above Vlasia, the monk Arsenios established the monastery with another notable monk, Eugenios, who was credited in establishing the monastery of Agia Lavra. Only a few relics of value still remain, including the icon of Agios Nikolaos or Saint Nicholas dating from 1115 AD. The icon was reportedly restored in 1739.

Museum of Sacrifice, Kalavrita
Peloponnese / Achaia

Exactly 50 years after the Nazi occupation massacred almost 700 male inhabitants over the age of 12 in Kalavryrta, the Museum of Sacrifice opened its doors to honour the fallen. The massacre happened in December 1943 in retribution for the killing of 81 German soldiers captured by the resistance. Only 13 of the 696 men survived, and the Government of Germany has made some efforts of atoning for the Third Reich’s atrocities. Today the museum stands for world peace. education and cooperation. It houses belongings of those killed, historical documents, photographs, artworks relating to the sad event, creating a unique opportunity to remind us of the unpleasant the not-so-distant past and reflect on how today the Germans and Greeks have cultivated close ties indeed.

Mycenaean Settlement near Chalandritsa
Peloponnese / Achaia

Near the town of Chalandritsa and Agios Georgios, while excavating to build a health centre in 1985, remains from a Mycenaean settlement emerged. Interesting is how the buildings were placed in concentric rings, with the streets emanating from the centre. There are more ruins, tombs and a megaron atop a nearby hill.

New Church of Agios Andreas, Patras
Peloponnese / Achaia

Proud to be the largest Orthodox Church in all of the Balkans with a capacity of 5,500 persons, Agios Andreas boasts exquisite architecture, beautiful paintings and great icons that adorn the interior. The church displays the skull of Saint Andrew as well as part of the cross he was crucified on. Interestingly, the old basilica is alleged to be at the exact spot where Saint Andrew was martyred. The same place was also where a temple to the ancient Goddess of Demeter existed.

Old Church of Agios Andreas, Patras
Peloponnese / Achaia

This church takes its name from the town’s patron saint (Andrew), where he was allegedly crucified. A marble grave testifyies to this event. Beside the old temple a spring once dedicated to the Goddess Dimitra – an oracle for the sick – was also where Saint Andrew taught. The spring water is considered holy.

Paleologos Castle
Peloponnese / Achaia

In the village of Sarantameri lie the remains of the Paleologos castle or palace, one of the last vestiges of this Byzantine dynasty.

Panagia Plataniotissa
Peloponnese / Achaia

Here’s a very different kind of church, one that has a natural twist to it, having made its home inside a plane tree. This is seen locally as a miracle, and 15-20 people can fit within the church. It is located on the way from Kalavrita to Aigio via Pteri, some 30km from Kalavrita.

Patras Roman Aqueduct
Peloponnese / Achaia

After designating Patras as a Roman colony and a gateway to Italy in 31 BC, the Roman emperors built an 6.5-kilometer-long aqueduct to support the city’s population. A water reservoir was also constructed by damming part of the Romanos River. Remains of the dam can still be seen within the riverbed.

Strofilia Forest in Kalogria
Peloponnese / Achaia

Forming an intricate ecosystem alongside the lagoons and Prokopou lake, the Strofilia Forest at Kalogria on the Gulf of Corinth is one of the largest in the Mediterranean. It spreads over 80 kilometres square or 20,000 acres. Cone, pine, myrtle, oak and other trees make up this forest which goes all the way to the coast. This is where the careta careta turtle lays its eggs, beside a natural fish farm. Numerous animal species roam the forest, which is a Ramsar protected area for birds as well.

The Monastery of Omplos
Peloponnese / Achaia

Safely established in the early 15th century in proximity of three fortresses (Sarakinokastro, Saravali and Siderokastro), the Monastery of Omplos is dedicated to Sweet Holy Mary and was built in place of a more ancient structure.

Turkish Hot Baths (Hammam), Patras
Peloponnese / Achaia

Dating from 1500 AD, the Hammam is actually still in use today. It is situated on 29 Boukaouri street in Patras

Vouraika Gorge
Peloponnese / Achaia

The Vouraika gorge has been carved out by the rushing Vourkaikos river which insolently continues to do so. Watching over this steep gorge are plane trees, pine forests and olive groves as it rises through Zachlorou village to reach 20 kilometres. One good way to discover its beauty is by taking the ultimate picturesque train ride from Kalavrita to Diakopto, on a one-of-a-kind line that’s been in operation since 1896. Hikers will also delight in any trek by the gorge.

Zarouchla Forest
Peloponnese / Achaia

Beside the village of Zarouchla, one of the biggest forests in Achaia is an ecosystem on its own. Rare black pine trees characterize the forest, along with chestnut trees and fir trees. The forest extends from Seliana up to Agia Varvara. Stay at one of Zarouchla’s three guest houses to enjoy this place up close.

Zoological Museum, Patras University
Peloponnese / Achaia

Thanks to isolated biotopes, hundreds of islands and a varied topography like no other, the Botanical museum claims it has around 150,000 samples of plant life. To be fair, the sample is both from Greece and from around the Mediterranean region, but mostly Greek. This massive archive representing plant life in the country helps highlight the very rich biodiversity of Greece, straddled between Asia, Europe and Africa.

Ancient Aigeira
Peloponnese / Achaia

Ancient travel writer Pausanias wrote about a temple dedicated to Artemis and one dedicated to Apollon, as well as statues of Agamemnon, Ifigeneia, Athena, Asclepius of Serapis and Isis.

Ancient Dymi and Olenos
Peloponnese / Achaia

Mystery had shrouded the true position of Dymi (also Dyme or Dimi) for some time, which in ancient literature was always paired with Olenos, both reputedly established some 4000 years ago. The Byzantines also had conflicting information about it.

Ancient Eliki
Peloponnese / Achaia

Known also as Helike, this ancient city near Aegio and the Selinus river lies today in the Municipality of Diakopto, where the idyllic village of Eliki is today. The old settlement was apparently destroyed by an earthquake and subsequent tsunami, with much ruins having sunk into the sea. Many ancients such as Siculus, Homer, Marcus Aurelius and of course Pausanias have referred to the city in their writings. The Temple of Elikonian Poseidon and others were noted at the site, which was officially discovered by archaeologists only in 2001. The site unveils evidence of destroyed buildings from the Classical era, as well as parts of the coastal Roman highway. Excavations of Eliki are also ongoing in the nearby village of Rizomylos.

Ancient Keryneia
Peloponnese / Achaia

Thanks to the efforts of the English Archaeological School, the move to unearth monuments from the Hellenistic era as well as a cemetery belonging to this ancient city have shed light on the site of Keryneia.

Ancient Kleitora and Azania
Peloponnese / Achaia

In Ano Kleitoria near the town of Lefkasi there are remains of the city of Azania. There is little remaining of the ancient walls surrounding the city, but relatively recently parts of the ancient theatre and more fortifications have emerged.

Ancient Klitoras in Klitoria
Peloponnese / Achaia

Once a thriving city with over 60,000 people and one of the first to be established, all that is left of Klitoras now are parts of walls, a theatre and a few buildings from Hellenistic and Roman times.

Ancient Lousoi
Peloponnese / Achaia

It was the Austrian Archaeological Institute and its work around this site that have revealed the remains of an important Arcadian city, lying in the Municipality of Kalavrita in the village of Soudena or Lousoi. Notable among the finds is the Temple of Artemis, dating back from the third century BC. Remains of the parliament, entrance and fountain, as well as a notable house with its courtyard are also visible. The location of the acropolis has also been determined, but not yet excavated.

Ancient Odeion of Patras
Peloponnese / Achaia

The Odeion of Patras was constructed just before that of Herod Atticus in Athens, in 161 AD. Twelve rows of seats render this theatre impressive, along with the wall of its stage, stairways, parapet and more. It was unearthed only in 1889 and redressed in marble to host many concerts and shows in summer.

Ancient Tritea in Kalentzi
Peloponnese / Achaia

Another member of the Achaian Cities, Tritea reached its zenith in the 3rd century BC, although little evidence remains. Around Vassilikos there are parts of an ancient building known as Palioklissi, while on Palataki hill there’s an underground building.

Ancient Vura, Egio
Peloponnese / Achaia

Lying over modern Egio (or Aegio) is Vura, which flourished after Eliki was destroyed. It was initially established by the Pelasgians who were followed by the Ionians. In 146 AD it fell under the Roman empire. Eventually the Byzantines, Franks Venetians and Ottomans all passed through. Not much remains form antiquity, but there are a couple of structures from the 4th and 5th century BC near the water tank and a cemetery from the Classical era, and Mycenaean tombs. Remains from an ancient theatre, some walls, temples and statues are also evident. The church of Agia Triada was built on remains of a temple, probably dedicated to the goddess Earth. Interestingly, a plane tree by the coast seems to be the same one Pausanias talked about in his travels.

Fortress of Patras
Peloponnese / Achaia

The castle-fortress of Patras was built in the 6th century A.D. by Justinian where an ancient acropolis once stood. The castle repelled the Slavs, Saracens and even Normans who surrounded the city and helped thwart the invasion of the Peloponnese.

Mycenaean Settlement near Chalandritsa
Peloponnese / Achaia

Near the town of Chalandritsa and Agios Georgios, while excavating to build a health centre in 1985, remains from a Mycenaean settlement emerged. Interesting is how the buildings were placed in concentric rings, with the streets emanating from the centre. There are more ruins, tombs and a megaron atop a nearby hill.

Patras Roman Aqueduct
Peloponnese / Achaia

After designating Patras as a Roman colony and a gateway to Italy in 31 BC, the Roman emperors built an 6.5-kilometer-long aqueduct to support the city’s population. A water reservoir was also constructed by damming part of the Romanos River. Remains of the dam can still be seen within the riverbed.

Castle of Oria (or Salmeniko)
Peloponnese / Achaia

Built sometime between 1280 and 1310, the remains of this castle on the outskirts of Kalavrita lie at an altitude of 1100 meters, surrounded by many legends and wars. Supposedly, Aikaterini Palaiologou, one of the few remaining notables of the Byzantine dynasty, leapt to her death in 1463 from the castle to avoid capture from the Ottoman Turks. In a twist of fate some 360 years later in 1821, the Greeks fired the first cannon against the Ottoman occupation towards its end. Today, only some ruins and part of a gate can be seen, but the place is still enchanting.

Doxapatri Tower, Skiada
Peloponnese / Achaia

In Skiada the ancient Tower of a Byzantine general, Doxapatri, has escaped destruction, whereas further south lie the scanty ruins of the castle of Paleologos.

Fortress at Rio
Peloponnese / Achaia

This fortress has had an illustrious history and changed hands many times: Ottoman Sultan Bayezit II built the initial fortification at Rio in 1499. It fell to the Spaniards in 1532, but was then reclaimed by the Ottomans. In 1603 the Knights of Malta destroyed parts of it, before the fort was taken over by Venetian nobleman and warlord Francesco Morosini. The latter added new bastions, towers and ramparts, only to have it seized again by the Ottomans in 1715. They eventually surrendered in 1828 to French revolutionist General Nicolas Joseph Maison at the end of the Greek revolution.

Fortress of Patras
Peloponnese / Achaia

The castle-fortress of Patras was built in the 6th century A.D. by Justinian where an ancient acropolis once stood. The castle repelled the Slavs, Saracens and even Normans who surrounded the city and helped thwart the invasion of the Peloponnese.

Paleologos Castle
Peloponnese / Achaia

In the village of Sarantameri lie the remains of the Paleologos castle or palace, one of the last vestiges of this Byzantine dynasty.

Cave of Hercules, Eleonas
Peloponnese / Achaia

Above the popular Eleonas beach and tourists on a mountain lies the cave of Hercules. Greek travel writer Pausanias in Roman times reveals that the cave hid a statue of Hercules, giving the exact directions of how to get there (descend from the ancient city of Vura and head to the coast by the river Vuraikos).

Agios Nikolaos, Platani
Peloponnese / Achaia

Lying at the northern foothills of the Panahaikos mountain range and beside the Xylokera stream, the church of Agios Nikolaos functioned as an old monastery according to Venetian records of the 17th century. It has since undergone many repairs.

Church of Agios Dimitrios in Dimi
Peloponnese / Achaia

Built during the 12th century, this church functioned as a school during Ottoman rule.

Church of Panagia Tripiti In Egio
Peloponnese / Achaia

Carved into rock above the coastal road, the church of Panagia Tripiti is surrounded with miracle giving. Supposedly a castaway lost at sea found his way when he saw a light through a hole in the rock. He headed towards it and found an image painted by Luke the evangelist.

Church of Theotokou, Farrai
Peloponnese / Achaia

Built at around 1400 AD, this is a Byzantine-type church that still carries the mystery and charm of Byzantine spirituality within its walls.

English Church, Patras
Peloponnese / Achaia

Surprisingly, the English have their own grand protestant church in Patras, built in 1878, established with the support of the wealthy British society living in the city at the time. The neo-gothic style is architecturally interesting, while the church has been used on some occasions as an exhibition hall.

Monastery of Agia Lavra
Peloponnese / Achaia

Destroyed by Ottoman tyrant Ibrahim Pasha, the Monastery of Agia Lavra was built twice and then moved lower down in 1689 to where it stands today. Rare icons, sacred vessels and important archives can all be seen here.

Monastery of Agia Triada near Akrata
Peloponnese / Achaia

Just three kilometres away from Akrata lies the monastery of Agia Triada, built in the 16th century. It boasts some beautiful murals painted sometime around the mid 18th century. Saintly relics, rare heirlooms including a gospel from 1672 and a venerable spirit overall can all be seen or experienced here.

Monastery of Agia Triada, Vorous
Peloponnese / Achaia

Built over the remains of an ancient temple dedicated to the goddess Earth, the now-deserted monastery of Agia Triada (Holy Trinity) was probably established in the 14th century.

Monastery of Agii Pantes
Peloponnese / Achaia

Built by the monk Nectarius – reputed as a skilled miracle worker – between 1715 and 1728, the monastery had special ties with the famous monastery of Saint Catherine in Egypt’s Sinai. Supposedly the monastery was protected by order of the sultan with special requests from the monks in Sinai.

Monastery of Chrysopodaritissa
Peloponnese / Achaia

Set in nature between Kalanos and Kalanistra in Farrai, the monastery of Holy Mary with a Golden Leg, as it translates, helps those in need through miracles. Many believe it cures the ailing leg of a believer. The place was often visited by the eparch Palaion Patron Germanos during the Greek revolution.

Monastery of Megalo Spileo
Peloponnese / Achaia

Meaning “Monastery of the Big Cave”, this 8-floor centre of worship was carved into the mountain and built at a height of 924 meters. It was originally built by two monks in the 4th century AD, and contains different icons such as Panagia Chrysospiliotissa as well as a special icon by the evangelist Luke. The latter is made of wax, mastic gum and perfume. Valuable manuscripts from the 17th century and captivating murals are also on display. The Monastery was actually destroyed five times since its inception, the most recent being by the Nazis in 1943. There’s a path from the monastery leading up to the cliffs where remains of a castle and some canons can be seen.

Monastery of Panagia Makellaria
Peloponnese / Achaia

On the river of the Selinountas not far from Lapanagi village(Municipality of Kalavrita) this monastery was said to be built by Emperor Justinian. Highly prized is the icon of the Mother of God that – somewhat reminiscent of the Mona Lisa – is supposed to look at you wherever you’re seated in the church.

Monastery of Panagia Pepelenitsa
Peloponnese / Achaia

Located near the village of Kounina/Aegialia across from the Monastery of Taxiarches, controversy surrounds the establishment of this monastery. Building was either undertaken by Elena Palaiologina, wife of emperor Emmanuel Palaiologos, or by Bebel Helenitsa, daughter of Achaian priest Thomas Palaiologos.

Monastery of Taxiarches near Egio
Peloponnese / Achaia

Rising above the Selinounta river barely a few kilometres from Egio, the Monastery of the Taxiarchs boasts a rich library and was founded in 1415. It was destroyed and rebuilt several times since then. Across the river there’s the female Monastery of Pepelenitsa. It is a male-only monastery.

Monastery of Vlasia
Peloponnese / Achaia

Above Vlasia, the monk Arsenios established the monastery with another notable monk, Eugenios, who was credited in establishing the monastery of Agia Lavra. Only a few relics of value still remain, including the icon of Agios Nikolaos or Saint Nicholas dating from 1115 AD. The icon was reportedly restored in 1739.

New Church of Agios Andreas, Patras
Peloponnese / Achaia

Proud to be the largest Orthodox Church in all of the Balkans with a capacity of 5,500 persons, Agios Andreas boasts exquisite architecture, beautiful paintings and great icons that adorn the interior. The church displays the skull of Saint Andrew as well as part of the cross he was crucified on. Interestingly, the old basilica is alleged to be at the exact spot where Saint Andrew was martyred. The same place was also where a temple to the ancient Goddess of Demeter existed.

Old Church of Agios Andreas, Patras
Peloponnese / Achaia

This church takes its name from the town’s patron saint (Andrew), where he was allegedly crucified. A marble grave testifyies to this event. Beside the old temple a spring once dedicated to the Goddess Dimitra – an oracle for the sick – was also where Saint Andrew taught. The spring water is considered holy.

Panagia Plataniotissa
Peloponnese / Achaia

Here’s a very different kind of church, one that has a natural twist to it, having made its home inside a plane tree. This is seen locally as a miracle, and 15-20 people can fit within the church. It is located on the way from Kalavrita to Aigio via Pteri, some 30km from Kalavrita.

The Monastery of Omplos
Peloponnese / Achaia

Safely established in the early 15th century in proximity of three fortresses (Sarakinokastro, Saravali and Siderokastro), the Monastery of Omplos is dedicated to Sweet Holy Mary and was built in place of a more ancient structure.

Doxapatri Tower, Skiada
Peloponnese / Achaia

In Skiada the ancient Tower of a Byzantine general, Doxapatri, has escaped destruction, whereas further south lie the scanty ruins of the castle of Paleologos.

Turkish Hot Baths (Hammam), Patras
Peloponnese / Achaia

Dating from 1500 AD, the Hammam is actually still in use today. It is situated on 29 Boukaouri street in Patras

Folk Art Museum of Patras
Peloponnese / Achaia

The Folk Art Museum is housed in one of the more venerable buildings in the famed Skagiopouleio neighbourhood known for its wartime orphanage. Embark on a trip into Greek city and country life of decades past, with a vigorous mix of folkloric items that unveil a totally different era in this part of the world.

Historical-Ethnological Museum of Patras
Peloponnese / Achaia

This museum features rare editions of books, newspapers as far back as 1875, historic magazines and valuable documents. The latter includes the first address of the 3rd National Assembly of the Greeks, sent in 1827 to Ioannis Kapodistrias, the country’s prime minister, just as Patras was gaining its independence.

Museum of Sacrifice, Kalavrita
Peloponnese / Achaia

Exactly 50 years after the Nazi occupation massacred almost 700 male inhabitants over the age of 12 in Kalavryrta, the Museum of Sacrifice opened its doors to honour the fallen. The massacre happened in December 1943 in retribution for the killing of 81 German soldiers captured by the resistance. Only 13 of the 696 men survived, and the Government of Germany has made some efforts of atoning for the Third Reich’s atrocities. Today the museum stands for world peace. education and cooperation. It houses belongings of those killed, historical documents, photographs, artworks relating to the sad event, creating a unique opportunity to remind us of the unpleasant the not-so-distant past and reflect on how today the Germans and Greeks have cultivated close ties indeed.

Zoological Museum, Patras University
Peloponnese / Achaia

Thanks to isolated biotopes, hundreds of islands and a varied topography like no other, the Botanical museum claims it has around 150,000 samples of plant life. To be fair, the sample is both from Greece and from around the Mediterranean region, but mostly Greek. This massive archive representing plant life in the country helps highlight the very rich biodiversity of Greece, straddled between Asia, Europe and Africa.

Kalamia Forest
Peloponnese / Achaia

Close to Akrata, the forest of Kalamia has some splendid oak trees representing one of the officially protected areas in the country. Fauna and flora abound in this extended green area, making it ideal for nature lovers. Nearby is the village of Mesourgi, which depends on agriculture (vegetables, fruits, olives).

Klokos, Barbas & Selinountas
Peloponnese / Achaia

Two opposing mountains, Klokos and Barbas are separated by Selinountas gorge or ravine, and considered a region of European Natural Heritage, as well as part of the Natura 2000 network. Alpine-like meadows dot the mountains at higher elevations above the tree line. Fir tree forests existed in both, though unfortunately the forests of Klokos burnt down. Luckily that of Barbas was untouched by the fire. Oak forests are also present on these two mountains, but systematic lumbering is threatening them. The Selinoudas valley was also home to pine woods which were almost totally burnt by the fires as well. Among the valley’s bushes there are many wild animals that seek shelter. This used to be a valuable shelter for many species including the Golden Eagle and Golden Falcon, as well as mammals like the Bidra civet. The area is considered an ecologically protected one, so care must be taken when visiting.

Kotychi Lagoon
Peloponnese / Achaia

Also known as Neofytos, the brackish Kotychi lagoon lies near the cape of Kyllini, covering 800 hectares and now considered the largest lagoon in the Peloponnese. Fed by fresh-water streams, its level fluctuates significantly and is a very important resting point for migrating birds.

Ladonas River & Aroanio Springs, Klitoria
Peloponnese / Achaia

The Ladonas river links Achaia with Arkadia, and is one of the most ancient in the Peloponnese. The river, associated with the dragon, is known for snaking its way along 60 kilometres of greenery and nature, a place where the old gods battled each other.

Lake Tsivlou
Peloponnese / Achaia

The magnificently bluish-green Tsivlou lake near Akrata lies a good 800 meters above sea level, considered very important for the local ecology and culture. Curiously, the lake was formed in 1913 after landfalls and resulting blockage of the Krathis river.

Strofilia Forest in Kalogria
Peloponnese / Achaia

Forming an intricate ecosystem alongside the lagoons and Prokopou lake, the Strofilia Forest at Kalogria on the Gulf of Corinth is one of the largest in the Mediterranean. It spreads over 80 kilometres square or 20,000 acres. Cone, pine, myrtle, oak and other trees make up this forest which goes all the way to the coast. This is where the careta careta turtle lays its eggs, beside a natural fish farm. Numerous animal species roam the forest, which is a Ramsar protected area for birds as well.

Vouraika Gorge
Peloponnese / Achaia

The Vouraika gorge has been carved out by the rushing Vourkaikos river which insolently continues to do so. Watching over this steep gorge are plane trees, pine forests and olive groves as it rises through Zachlorou village to reach 20 kilometres. One good way to discover its beauty is by taking the ultimate picturesque train ride from Kalavrita to Diakopto, on a one-of-a-kind line that’s been in operation since 1896. Hikers will also delight in any trek by the gorge.

Zarouchla Forest
Peloponnese / Achaia

Beside the village of Zarouchla, one of the biggest forests in Achaia is an ecosystem on its own. Rare black pine trees characterize the forest, along with chestnut trees and fir trees. The forest extends from Seliana up to Agia Varvara. Stay at one of Zarouchla’s three guest houses to enjoy this place up close.

No Olive Mills Found In This Destination. Please Check Other Attractions.
Achaia Clauss
Peloponnese / Achaia

A must-visit winery is Achaia-Clauss with its stone buildings and large oak barrels, only 8 kilometres outside the city in green surroundings. The winery was built by the Bavarian Gustav Clauss in 1854 that is today known for its excellent wine. There are daily wine tours in the facility.

Aliki/Egio
Peloponnese / Achaia

The beach of Aliki in Egio, despite being a formal beach, is also an important aquatic ecosystem and partly a lagoon, lying to the northeast of the beach. There are about 120 bird species that visit plus significant aquatic life. The rich flora of the area is also noteworthy.

Ancient Lousoi
Peloponnese / Achaia

It was the Austrian Archaeological Institute and its work around this site that have revealed the remains of an important Arcadian city, lying in the Municipality of Kalavrita in the village of Soudena or Lousoi. Notable among the finds is the Temple of Artemis, dating back from the third century BC. Remains of the parliament, entrance and fountain, as well as a notable house with its courtyard are also visible. The location of the acropolis has also been determined, but not yet excavated.

Ancient Odeion of Patras
Peloponnese / Achaia

The Odeion of Patras was constructed just before that of Herod Atticus in Athens, in 161 AD. Twelve rows of seats render this theatre impressive, along with the wall of its stage, stairways, parapet and more. It was unearthed only in 1889 and redressed in marble to host many concerts and shows in summer.

Church of Panagia Tripiti In Egio
Peloponnese / Achaia

Carved into rock above the coastal road, the church of Panagia Tripiti is surrounded with miracle giving. Supposedly a castaway lost at sea found his way when he saw a light through a hole in the rock. He headed towards it and found an image painted by Luke the evangelist.

Folk Art Museum of Patras
Peloponnese / Achaia

The Folk Art Museum is housed in one of the more venerable buildings in the famed Skagiopouleio neighbourhood known for its wartime orphanage. Embark on a trip into Greek city and country life of decades past, with a vigorous mix of folkloric items that unveil a totally different era in this part of the world.

Fortress at Rio
Peloponnese / Achaia

This fortress has had an illustrious history and changed hands many times: Ottoman Sultan Bayezit II built the initial fortification at Rio in 1499. It fell to the Spaniards in 1532, but was then reclaimed by the Ottomans. In 1603 the Knights of Malta destroyed parts of it, before the fort was taken over by Venetian nobleman and warlord Francesco Morosini. The latter added new bastions, towers and ramparts, only to have it seized again by the Ottomans in 1715. They eventually surrendered in 1828 to French revolutionist General Nicolas Joseph Maison at the end of the Greek revolution.

Klokos, Barbas & Selinountas
Peloponnese / Achaia

Two opposing mountains, Klokos and Barbas are separated by Selinountas gorge or ravine, and considered a region of European Natural Heritage, as well as part of the Natura 2000 network. Alpine-like meadows dot the mountains at higher elevations above the tree line. Fir tree forests existed in both, though unfortunately the forests of Klokos burnt down. Luckily that of Barbas was untouched by the fire. Oak forests are also present on these two mountains, but systematic lumbering is threatening them. The Selinoudas valley was also home to pine woods which were almost totally burnt by the fires as well. Among the valley’s bushes there are many wild animals that seek shelter. This used to be a valuable shelter for many species including the Golden Eagle and Golden Falcon, as well as mammals like the Bidra civet. The area is considered an ecologically protected one, so care must be taken when visiting.

Lake Tsivlou
Peloponnese / Achaia

The magnificently bluish-green Tsivlou lake near Akrata lies a good 800 meters above sea level, considered very important for the local ecology and culture. Curiously, the lake was formed in 1913 after landfalls and resulting blockage of the Krathis river.

Monastery of Megalo Spileo
Peloponnese / Achaia

Meaning “Monastery of the Big Cave”, this 8-floor centre of worship was carved into the mountain and built at a height of 924 meters. It was originally built by two monks in the 4th century AD, and contains different icons such as Panagia Chrysospiliotissa as well as a special icon by the evangelist Luke. The latter is made of wax, mastic gum and perfume. Valuable manuscripts from the 17th century and captivating murals are also on display. The Monastery was actually destroyed five times since its inception, the most recent being by the Nazis in 1943. There’s a path from the monastery leading up to the cliffs where remains of a castle and some canons can be seen.

Museum of Sacrifice, Kalavrita
Peloponnese / Achaia

Exactly 50 years after the Nazi occupation massacred almost 700 male inhabitants over the age of 12 in Kalavryrta, the Museum of Sacrifice opened its doors to honour the fallen. The massacre happened in December 1943 in retribution for the killing of 81 German soldiers captured by the resistance. Only 13 of the 696 men survived, and the Government of Germany has made some efforts of atoning for the Third Reich’s atrocities. Today the museum stands for world peace. education and cooperation. It houses belongings of those killed, historical documents, photographs, artworks relating to the sad event, creating a unique opportunity to remind us of the unpleasant the not-so-distant past and reflect on how today the Germans and Greeks have cultivated close ties indeed.

Mycenaean Settlement near Chalandritsa
Peloponnese / Achaia

Near the town of Chalandritsa and Agios Georgios, while excavating to build a health centre in 1985, remains from a Mycenaean settlement emerged. Interesting is how the buildings were placed in concentric rings, with the streets emanating from the centre. There are more ruins, tombs and a megaron atop a nearby hill.

Strofilia Forest in Kalogria
Peloponnese / Achaia

Forming an intricate ecosystem alongside the lagoons and Prokopou lake, the Strofilia Forest at Kalogria on the Gulf of Corinth is one of the largest in the Mediterranean. It spreads over 80 kilometres square or 20,000 acres. Cone, pine, myrtle, oak and other trees make up this forest which goes all the way to the coast. This is where the careta careta turtle lays its eggs, beside a natural fish farm. Numerous animal species roam the forest, which is a Ramsar protected area for birds as well.

Zoological Museum, Patras University
Peloponnese / Achaia

Thanks to isolated biotopes, hundreds of islands and a varied topography like no other, the Botanical museum claims it has around 150,000 samples of plant life. To be fair, the sample is both from Greece and from around the Mediterranean region, but mostly Greek. This massive archive representing plant life in the country helps highlight the very rich biodiversity of Greece, straddled between Asia, Europe and Africa.

Aliki/Egio
Peloponnese / Achaia

The beach of Aliki in Egio, despite being a formal beach, is also an important aquatic ecosystem and partly a lagoon, lying to the northeast of the beach. There are about 120 bird species that visit plus significant aquatic life. The rich flora of the area is also noteworthy.

Achaia Clauss
Peloponnese / Achaia

A must-visit winery is Achaia-Clauss with its stone buildings and large oak barrels, only 8 kilometres outside the city in green surroundings. The winery was built by the Bavarian Gustav Clauss in 1854 that is today known for its excellent wine. There are daily wine tours in the facility.