Archeology

Archeology In Greece
Acharnian Gate of the Ancient Athens Wall
Athens & Nearby Islands / Athens City

Like many cities in antiquity, Ancient Athens was surrounded by a wall and featured different gates to access the city. The location of the Acharnian Gate – the gate that leads to the town of Acharnes north of the city – was initially lost in time.

Acrocorinth
Peloponnese / Korinthia

Ancient Corinth also boasts archaeological ruins – mostly Roman and some Greek – at the foot of the huge rock, Acrocorinth. Walls, mosaics, reliefs and works of different civilizations are all present.

Acropolis of Ancient Samia (Kato Samiko)
Peloponnese / Ilia

Near the ancient city of Trifilia, founded south of Olympia on the valley of Alfios river, lies the acropolis of Ancient Samia or Samiko in what is known today as Kato Samiko.

Acropolis of Arkesia, Arkasa
Dodecanese / Karpathos

In 1923 excavations in the area of Arkasa discovered the remains of and acropolis at the Church of Agia Sofia (previously Agia Anastasia). Mosaics, a graveyard and some inscriptions from the later period remain, so do ancient columns.

Acropolis of Farsala & other ruins
Thessaly & Sporades / Lake Karla & Mavrovouni

The Acropolis of Farsala lies atop a rocky hill of the Prophet Elias, stretching from east to west. It is 500 meters long and 60 meters wide, surrounding by natural fortifications. Worth a visit when passing near Farsala.

Acropolis of Pyrasos
Thessaly & Sporades / Lake Karla & Mavrovouni

The 29 metre high low hill of Magoula that stands on a low (29 meter) hill above the town was once the acropolis of Pyrasos. Pyrasos is scarcely known from historical sources, except that it was an active harbour and featured a famous temple of Demeter and Kore, after which the harbour was later known as Demetrion.

Acropolis of Sparta
Peloponnese / Laconia

There are only a few remains of the Acropolis of Sparta, with evidence of a Roman agora, a theatre, a cyclical building and a theatre. The Church of Christ from the 1st century AD is also there.

Acropolis of the ancient Feres
Thessaly & Sporades / Lake Karla & Mavrovouni

One of Thessaly’s most notable sites, the Acropolis of ancient Feres was inhabited between the neolithic period (around 300 B.C.) and the era of the early Roman Empire (first century A.D.), and again in the Byzantine period during the 13th Century. It was given its name in modern history for being the home of local author, politician and revolutionary Rigas Feraios, who was one of the heroes of the 1821 Greek Revolution. The site has undergone few renovations until the present day although its most vulnerable parts are being maintained.

Acropolis, Athens
Athens & Nearby Islands / Athens City

Welcome to the Parthenon on the Acropolis Hill, one of the world’s most important structures, considered a true symbol of civilization and democracy that has been standing for 2,500 years. Even in the stone age (Neolithic period), millennia before the Parthenon was built, the Acropolis represented a military fortress, thanks to its strategic vantage point over land and sea.

Aghia Triadha
Crete / Herakleion

A splendid site, a couple of kilometres to the west of the “palace” of phaistos, Aghia Triadha is known to have had a history dating back to the middle of the 4th milennium BC.

Ahinos in the Municipality of Ehinaion
Central Greece / Fthiotida

Ahinos was built where the city of ancient Ehinos (or Echinous) stood. There are remains of an acropolis from the 4th century BC and a tower that is still quite intact, as well as a war memorial or heroes tomb from roman times. Rectangular walls constructed by Theban general Epaminondas to control access to the sea were built on a hilltop north of the village, and were reinforced and expanded throughout history. Additions from the time of Justinian are also visible.

Akrolamia Frankish castle, Lamia
Central Greece / Fthiotida

The Frankish castle in Lamia (Akrolamia) dominates the city among stones from an ancient acropolis. Many parts are intact including bastions and walls. Successive repairs took place in Byzantine and medieval times, and the site was inhabited even during the 5th century BC. There’s an archaeological museum in the castle.

Ales, Municipality of Malesina
Central Greece / Fthiotida

The ancient settlement of Ales contains ruins from the Neolithic era, as well as ruins from the 6th century BC up to the Hellenistic and Byzantine eras. There are remains of an ancient sanctuary and ancient port.

Aliartos
Central Greece / Viotia

Near the dusty modern town of Aliartos lies an acropolis of mixed origins. The Mycenaean part lies on the hill, with more modern buildings from the 7th century BC to its north. Two towers from the 6th-5th centuries BC remain, with parts of a temple dedicated to the goddess Athena. Coins from around 500 BC were found here, as well as a cemetery dating from the Roman period.

Alikyrna
Central Greece / Aitolo-Akarnania

This ancient city from the 4th century before Christ came to light while excavating the Ionia Odos highway recently. Its foundations can be seen near the community of Hilia Spitia.

Almyropotamos
Evia / Southern Evia

The area of Almyropotamos is one of Greece’s most important Paleolithic sites.

Altar remains, Marmara
Central Greece / Evrytania

South of Mount Parnassos, at an altitude of about 1500 meters and overlooking the Oracle of Delphi, there are remains of a shrine or altar lying on the hill of Marmara. It dates back to the 4th century BC most probably.

Amarynthos
Evia / Central Evia

Within the last two centuries, prehistoric settlements dating before 3000 BC have been unearthed here, as well as numerous artefacts from a variety of regions and cultures, confirming that Amarynthos was an important trading centre during ancient times. Many of the archaeological discoveries have been found on the hill above the natural harbour as well as throughout the wider area.

Amnisos
Crete / Herakleion

One of the two ports of Knossos, Middle Minoan (c1900 BC) artifacts have been found here. Mentioned on Linear B tablets as A-Mi-Ni-So, and connected with the cults of Zeus and Eileithya. The hill above (known as Palaichora) has uncovered the finds of the ‘Villa of the Lillies’. The area was occupied all the way through to later Roman times (2nd C. AD), and again during the Venetian period (1204-1669) before being destoyed during the Ottoman period (1669-1898). An incredibly important Linear B tablet, has offerings of honey to Eileithya at Amnisos, confirming the names of both the port, and the goddess.

Amphiareion, North Attica
Athens & Nearby Islands / Athens City

One of the less known gods of mythology, Amphiaraos was a deity of healing. He emerged from a spring near the temple on the Northern border of Attica. This is also an ancient Doric temple that fits 3000 people dating from the 4th century BC. Other ruins in the area are from the 6th century BC.

Amphipolis, 62 km south of Serres
Macedonia & Thrace / Serres

Originally called ‘Nine Roads’ for the nine roads leading out of it, Amphipolis was where the Persian king Xerxes buried alive 9 youths and another 9 maidens to appease the gods after his defeat at the Battle of Salamis.

Amyklaion and Sanctuary of Apollo Amyklaios
Peloponnese / Laconia

This site flourished as far back as the prehistoric era and well into the Roman period. Spartan festivals were held there. The sanctuary was excavated in 1890, while barts of the Throne of Bathykles were retrieved from there as well.

Anaglyfo Mithra’s site, Thermes village
Macedonia & Thrace / Xanthi

Dating from the 2nd and 3rd centuries BC), this site is located in a cave. In the centre of the cave, a carving of Mithras who was a god of the sun of Persian origin is depicted. The carving shows Mithras sacrificing a bull, while followers of the god are watching.

Ancient Acropolis of Karystos
Evia / Southern Evia

Located just below the impressive Castello Rosso, the remnants of Karystos’ ancient acropolis can still be seen today. Though little remains, an impressive amount of inscriptions were found here.

Ancient acropolis of Oreoi
Evia / Northern Evia

Crumbling walls and a vague outline of foundations are all that is left of the acropolis of the ancient city of Oreoi. They are located just outside the eponymous seaside harbour and are all that remains of this city founded by Pericles.

Ancient Acropolis of Sistrouni
Epirus / Ioannina

Just outside the village of Sistrouni in the southwest area of the region lie the remains of an ancient building which dates back to the fourth century BC. Little remains today, including a few remnants of walls and water tanks.

Ancient Agora of Kos (Kos Town)
Dodecanese / Kos

Dating back to the 4thC BC, the ancient Agora in Kos constituted the political, commercial, religious and social hub of the island and was one of the most important Agoras in the world. Walk through the arcades, admire the temples and columns, meander through the sanctuaries and you’ll get a glimpse of the bustling center that once defined this island.

Ancient Aigeira
Peloponnese / Achaia

Ancient travel writer Pausanias wrote about a temple dedicated to Artemis and one dedicated to Apollon, as well as statues of Agamemnon, Ifigeneia, Athena, Asclepius of Serapis and Isis.

Ancient Alifeira
Peloponnese / Ilia

Alifeira is situated on the top of a steep hill over the modern village of Alifeira. This hill is also known as the Nerovitsa Castle. It was occupied by Philip in 229 BC and then became a member of the Achaic commonwealth. Today there is evidence of walls surrounding the citadel, with the foundations of the temple of Athina from the 5th century BC. A sanctuary lies in the northern part of the temple and a 14-step entrance lies in the front part. Another temple on the western side, that of Asklipies, was also discovered, dating from the second half of the 4th century BC. Six tombstones also grace the site, with one having a temple-like facade and a pediment.

Ancient Alos at Kefalosi, Almyros
Thessaly & Sporades / Magnesia (Pelion)

On the plain between Mount Othrys and Chalkodonio lie remains of the Hellenistic town of Alos. Findings such as vessels, tools, jewellery and remains of houses attest to the importance of this city once upon a time.

Ancient Alyzia (or Alyzea)
Central Greece / Aitolo-Akarnania

When at Mikitas ask how to get to the remains of Alyzia, considered one of the most important cities of Akarnania in ancient times.

Ancient Anaktorion
Central Greece / Aitolo-Akarnania

Excavations haven’t been undertaken at the area (Agios Petros) where Anaktorion lies, but there are remains of the city’s surrounding walls and ancient temples (on a nearby hill there are ruins of a medieval castle and an old church).

Ancient Asea or Sapiko, near Sapolivado
Peloponnese / Arkadia

At the beginning of the plain of Asea in today’s Sapolivado (Sapiko in Byzantine times) there are remains of the area’s old acropolis.

Ancient Athamanon in Argithea
Thessaly & Sporades / Karditsa (Lake Plastira)

The traditional village of Argithea was once where the ancient capital of Athamania was located, some two kilometres west of the village at a site called Ellinika. Excavations have revealed large walls 15 metres in height, ancient residences, preserved remnants of the walls around the city, parts of the statues and their pedestals, an ancient cemetery on the eastern side of the old city, and another to the west (4th to 1st century BC), more than 180 enclosed tombs, and limestone plaques from local stone along with a wealth of funeral gifts. A pillaged memorial tomb plus tombstone stele and artefacts rich with inscriptions have all been unearthed. This is the most important of all archaeological sites of ancient Athamanon. Excavations have revealed large walls 15 metres in height, ancient residences, preserved remnants of the walls around the city, parts of the statues and their pedestals, an ancient cemetery on the eastern side of the old city, and another to the west (4th to 1st century BC), more than 180 enclosed tombs, and limestone plaques from local stone along with a wealth of funeral gifts. A pillaged memorial tomb plus tombstone stele and artefacts rich with inscriptions have all been unearthed. This is the most important of all archaeological sites of ancient Athamanon.

Ancient Athamanon tombs and graves
Thessaly & Sporades / Karditsa (Lake Plastira)

The village of Koumbouriana within Athamanon lies an altitude of 1050 meters. The Kato Choro or ‘lowlands’ of the area have been characterised as an official archaeological district with ruins of many old buildings and numerous ancient tombs and graves.

Ancient Basilica and Kiln in Lefkos
Dodecanese / Karpathos

Remains of an early Christian church emerged during excavations at Lefkos some 50 years ago, complete with mosaics and parts of a large apse, indicating a flourishing civilization between the 1st and 7th centuries AD.

Ancient Batia
Epirus / Preveza & Parga

Just outside the village of Rizovouni within the Thesprotikos district lie the remnants of the ancient city of Batia. It was built by the Helian tribe sometime during the 6th century BC. This tribe was at constant battle with the Mollosian Tribe, whose cities of Orraon and Kassopi can also be seen within Preveza.

Ancient Brasiae near Agios Andreas
Peloponnese / Arkadia

This may be the site of Ancient Brasiae or Brasias with remains of a very ancient acropolis lying on the hill above Agios Andreas, with ruins from Palasgian times. Graves from different periods are also present.

Ancient City of Nirikos (Kaligoni, near Lefkada Town)
Ionian Islands / Lefkada

Nirikos was Lefkada’s capital, it was founded in 2000 BC and experienced significant economic prosperity due to its strategic location off the western coast of mainland Greece. One of Dörpfeld’s famous archaeological digs, you can still see the remains of a pre-Roman theater, towers, outer walls, a cemetery and aqueducts.

Ancient Dipaea, Piana
Peloponnese / Arkadia

Near the village of Piana where the waters of the Elisson or Davia River run, there are remains of the ancient city of Dipaea. There’s also a medieval castle.

Ancient Dodona
Epirus / Ioannina

In the shadows of Mt. Tomaros lie the ruins of the oldest oracle in ancient Greece, with researchers placing its origins as far back as the Bronze Age between 2600 and 1900 BC. It was dedicated to an early deity representing the Earth Mother similar to Gaia or Rhea.

Ancient Dolopia at Belokomitis
Thessaly & Sporades / Karditsa (Lake Plastira)

At the area called Plagia near Belokomitis, a building site and parts of ancient walls from the time of the ancient Dolopians (6th century BC) were discovered. At the Panigiraki site, a house dating from the 6th century AD was excavated. At Paliospita, there’s a settlement dating between the 8th to 10th centuries AD.

Ancient Dolopia at Karitsa
Thessaly & Sporades / Karditsa (Lake Plastira)

Karitsa of the Dolopons is one of the older villages of Nevropolis and was continually occupied since the Byzantine era. At Paliohori just past the village of Karitsa near the river there are archaeological ruins belonging to the ancient Dolopes. Artefacts reveal that the settlement dates from the 3rd century BC.

Ancient Dymi and Olenos
Peloponnese / Achaia

Mystery had shrouded the true position of Dymi (also Dyme or Dimi) for some time, which in ancient literature was always paired with Olenos, both reputedly established some 4000 years ago. The Byzantines also had conflicting information about it.

Ancient Efyra
Epirus / Preveza & Parga

On a hill a mere 500 metres from the Nekromanteio lay the ruins of Ancient Efyra.It was formerly an important Mycenaean colony with its origins dating back to the 14th century BC and is mentioned by both Homer and Thucydides. The area was inhabited as early as the late Bronze Age, though there is little to be seen today since a Hellenistic sanctuary was built over it.

Ancient Elateia
Central Greece / Fthiotida

In the municipality by the same name, Elateia or Elatia boasts remains of an agora and a temple dedicated to Asclepius with a beardless statue made to his liking. A theatre and statue dedicated to Athena are also found on the site.

Ancient Eliki
Peloponnese / Achaia

Known also as Helike, this ancient city near Aegio and the Selinus river lies today in the Municipality of Diakopto, where the idyllic village of Eliki is today. The old settlement was apparently destroyed by an earthquake and subsequent tsunami, with much ruins having sunk into the sea. Many ancients such as Siculus, Homer, Marcus Aurelius and of course Pausanias have referred to the city in their writings. The Temple of Elikonian Poseidon and others were noted at the site, which was officially discovered by archaeologists only in 2001. The site unveils evidence of destroyed buildings from the Classical era, as well as parts of the coastal Roman highway. Excavations of Eliki are also ongoing in the nearby village of Rizomylos.

Ancient Eretria, Farsala, Larisa region
Thessaly & Sporades / Lake Karla & Mavrovouni

Ancient Eretria was founded on a hill some 650 meters high in the middle of the great Thessalian plain, not far from today’s village of Palaiomylos. You’ll find few remains of an acropolis, walls and gates on the site. Source: Farsala.gr

Ancient Falassarna
Crete / Hania

Known mostly to travellers as one of the most exquisite beaches on the island, Falassarna like almost every destination in Crete, has an ancient past steeped in historical significance. Once a city itself with a grand trading port one will find evidence of this at its archaeological site which includes remains of the port itself, a cemetery with small, rectangular cist graves, ruins of the city and its walls, as well as an enormous stone throne thought to have been built as a platform for speeches or possibly as an offering to Poseidon, God of the Sea.

Ancient Figaleia
Peloponnese / Ilia

Once a very powerful city, Figaleia was surrounded by a thick wall and with circular and rectangular towers which are still in evidence today and in relatively good condition. Roman travel writer Pausanias mentioned the existence of priests at the Temple of Artemis, writing about Dionysus Evroinomis, a gymnasium and agora, as well as statues of Hermes and of Olympic champion, Arachiona. The latter was found in the ancient agora of the town.

Ancient Gomfoi
Thessaly & Sporades / Karditsa (Lake Plastira)

The site of the ancient city of Gomfoi (pronounced Gomfi) is located 2 km northwest of Episkopi within the region of Mouzaki. The ruins of Gomfoi include a fortified wall, part of which was recently excavated.
In 48 B.C., Gomfoi initially took the side of Pompey following the policy of the Commons of Thessaly. The Gomfians refused to open their gates to the army of Caesar, and after a lengthy siege Caesar overtook the city. In the sixth century AD during the reign of Justinian, the fortifications of the city were strengthened and during the Byzantine era it became the seat of a Bishopric.

Ancient Greek Theater (Mytilini Town)
North Aegean / Lesvos

This stunning Ancient Greek theater dates back to the Hellenistic age and is thought to be as important and beautiful as the Ancient Theater of Epidavros. Fits up to 15,000 people, it is an archaeological gem Lesvos is proud of. Admire the 24-m circular orchestra pit. Explore the theater and then hike through the surrounding pine forest.

Ancient House – The Garden of Hippocrates
Dodecanese / Kos

Take a tour of the exact replica of a 5thC BC Ancient Kos home. Admire the kitchen with all the utensils and the unique chimney. You’ll find statues and votive offerings to the gods as well. Explore the philosophical lodge outside, and add to the botanical garden by planting herbs used by Hippocrates himself. Craft lessons are also offered for mosaic-making.

Ancient Ialyssos
Dodecanese / Rhodes (Rodos)

The green pine forested 267m Mount Philerimos, on the west side of the island, approximately 15kms from Rhodes town, is the site of the ancient acropolis of Ialysos.

Ancient Ilida
Peloponnese / Ilia

Ilida was the capital of the prefecture Ilia and organized the Olympic Games. There are some excavations and buildings from Greek and Roman times. These include a the theatre, gymnasium, Gallery of Corfu or double arcade and the Meridian Gallery with a triple aisle. Evidence of a square-shaped building with an interior courtyard can also be found.

Ancient Iraea near Ayios Ioannis
Peloponnese / Arkadia

Loutra Iraeas near the Ladonas bridge has sulphur springs which may have been popular in antiquity. Very good mosaics are present in what used to an ancient bathhouse, in an area known also as Liadora. The ruins of Ancient Iraea (built by Iraeus, son of Lycaon) are found south of here, near Ayios Ioannis on the banks of the Alfeos river. The city, which had two temples dedicated to Dionysus and an edifice for orgies, was also home of the famous athlete Damaretos (who was victorious in the armed race at the Olympics).

Ancient Kallithiro at Agios Athanasios
Thessaly & Sporades / Karditsa (Lake Plastira)

Kallithiro in Itamo features an archaeological dig on the hill of Agios Athanasios which revealed artefacts from the ancient city of Kallithiro. The city was supposedly destroyed in a fire in 220 to 230 BC. Three more archaeological sites are within the inhabited part of the village.

Ancient Kalydona (Lafreaio) near Mesolongi
Central Greece / Aitolo-Akarnania

Here was a highly important Aetolian sanctuary dedicated to Apollo and Artemis. It is located southwest of the site’s acropolis and was in use up to Roman times. There used to be a chryselephantine statue of Artemis in the sanctuary and a tomb for the hero Leon. Excavations where done by Greece and Denmark in the 1930s.

Ancient Kamiros
Dodecanese / Rhodes (Rodos)

On the north-western shore of Rhodes, lie the haunting remains of Ancient Kamiros, a must for any archaeology or history lover. This quiet, remarkable site, 32 kms from the city of Rhodes, on the foothills of Mount Akramytis, tells a tale of a rich and advanced civilization.

Ancient Kassopi
Epirus / Preveza & Parga

What remains of this ancient city stand silently just below Mount Zalongou. Here the Epirote tribe of the Kassopians built their capital city in an attempt to unify neighbouring villages to thwart a possible attack by the Helian tribe. Fragments of the city’s walls and gates still remain as well as the remnants of some private residences. The beautiful views of the Ionian Sea and Amvrakikos Gulf below are an added plus.

Ancient Kasthanea, Keramidi
Thessaly & Sporades / Lake Karla & Mavrovouni

The remains of Ancient Kasthanea (or Kasthanaia) near Keramidi have revealed remains of a city who according to Herodotus was involved in defeating the Persian King Xerxes in 480 BC. Only parts of the walls of this city still remain today.

Ancient Keryneia
Peloponnese / Achaia

Thanks to the efforts of the English Archaeological School, the move to unearth monuments from the Hellenistic era as well as a cemetery belonging to this ancient city have shed light on the site of Keryneia.

Ancient Kirra in Itea
Central Greece / Fokida

Near Itea on the seaside, there used to be an ancient settlement called Kirra, dating back to at least 3,000 BC. Although no one knows its exact origins, it is believed that merchants from Crete established the city. Kirra flourished after 1100 BC as a port city which was the gateway to Delphi. It was surrounded by walls and dotted with temples dedicated to Leto, Apollo and Artemis, including grand statues. The city’s heydays probably ended in AD 740 with a massive earthquake that hit the area. Today, only parts of a medieval tower remain.

Ancient Kleitora and Azania
Peloponnese / Achaia

In Ano Kleitoria near the town of Lefkasi there are remains of the city of Azania. There is little remaining of the ancient walls surrounding the city, but relatively recently parts of the ancient theatre and more fortifications have emerged.

Ancient Klitoras in Klitoria
Peloponnese / Achaia

Once a thriving city with over 60,000 people and one of the first to be established, all that is left of Klitoras now are parts of walls, a theatre and a few buildings from Hellenistic and Roman times.

Ancient Koronta
Central Greece / Aitolo-Akarnania

Not far from the village of Chysovitsa are remains from the ancient town of Koronta, including Mycenaean graves, Cyclopean walls a reservoir and evidence of a castle. There was a Doric-style temple built in honour of an unidentified female godess, as well as remains of different buildings. Although the site was robbed many times, several artefacts were found and are now in the museum of Agrinio. They include golden wreaths, copper knives, a golden pig and many other objects.

Ancient Korsia and Voumelitea, Malesina
Central Greece / Fthiotida

An ancient settlement in the area of Hiliadou is suspected, with remains pointing either to the ancient city of Korsia or to Voumelitea. There is written evidence that Voumelitea is supposed to be right next to Ales.

Ancient Krefsis
Central Greece / Viotia

Ancient Krefsis boasted once an acropolis against mount Korombili with venerable towers and walls. Parts of the complex remains, including a wall and parts of the towers from the 4th century BC. Much later another medieval tower was built, dating from the 14th century AD and was called Erimokastro or desert castle.

Ancient Krisa in Chrisso
Central Greece / Fokida

Chrisso, so called because an ancient town called Krisa stood once in its place back in the 14th or 15th centuries BC, displays remains of walls near Stefani hill at the southern side of the Chrisso. Also the hippodrome of Delphi for the Pythian games was in Chrisso long ago, but not much remains of it.

Ancient Lamia
Central Greece / Fthiotida

The city of Lamia was built over ancient remains from the 4th century BC, and sections of the old walls surrounding the city have been uncovered. The walls began at the hill of Akrolamia or the castle hill, ending at the hill of Agios Loukas. There are remains of the ancient city all over, including under the National Bank of Greece which are still visible in some of the underground parts of the buildings.

Ancient Lepreo
Peloponnese / Ilia

Built in a strategic position, Ancient Lepreo was a powerful city that strategically controlled all passages to Ilia, Messinia and Arcadia. This city would have frequent conflicts with the Ilians who were their main rivals.

Ancient Lilea or Lilaia
Central Greece / Fokida

The modern village of Lilaia near Polidrossos is built on the ancient city by the same name, inhabited from the early Helladic period (2800-2100 BC). The fortification walls at the citadel summit indicate traces of a constructional phase before the city was destroyed by Phillip II. Another part of the fortress dates back to the rebuilding phase after the reign of Phillip II. In 200 BC the city was under siege by King Phillip V but it revolted and gained its liberty. The city was also mentioned often in the accounts of Strabo, Ptolemy, Pliny and Pausanias, who noted an agora, theatre, baths, sanctuary to Apollo and one to Artemis. Both temples featured marble statues of the gods in standing posture, made by Athenian sculptors. Lilaia was constantly inhabited until the Byzantine era but soon thereafter fell into decay and was abandoned. Today, walls from antiquity and remains of a castle that are still visible.

Ancient Lindos and Acropolis
Dodecanese / Rhodes (Rodos)

The ancient city state protected by its strong acropolis was a major maritime power, the birthplace of Kleoboulos (a moderate tyrant, one of the seven sages of the ancient world known for his “everything in moderation”).

Ancient Lousoi
Peloponnese / Achaia

It was the Austrian Archaeological Institute and its work around this site that have revealed the remains of an important Arcadian city, lying in the Municipality of Kalavrita in the village of Soudena or Lousoi. Notable among the finds is the Temple of Artemis, dating back from the third century BC. Remains of the parliament, entrance and fountain, as well as a notable house with its courtyard are also visible. The location of the acropolis has also been determined, but not yet excavated.

Ancient Lykosoura, Megalopolis
Peloponnese / Arkadia

Overlooking the plain of Megalopolis, Lykosoura is a very ancient holy city with remains from temples dedicated to Despoina, Demeter and the Great Mother, one dating from the 4th century BC.

Ancient Mantineia, Gourtsouli Hill
Peloponnese / Arkadia

Just 10 km from Tripoli in the plain of Milia lie the remains of Ancient Mantineia (or Mantinea) and its acropolis. There are traces of temples, a theatre, an agora and other buildings. A strange doorless sanctuary dedicated to Poseidon also existed here.

Ancient market arcade theatre
Thessaly & Sporades / Lake Karla & Mavrovouni

Northeast of the low hill of Kastraki you will find the base of an ancient theatre, and a flat area where one can assume the theatre orchestra once stood.

Ancient Megalopolis, Megalopolis
Peloponnese / Arkadia

Having gathered settlers from all over Arkadia, Megalopolis offered temples to many gods such as Zeus, Asclepius, the Mother of the Gods and more. Its ruins include the Stoa of Philippos, Sanctuary of Zeus Soter, Stoa of Myropolis and a Bouleterion. There was also an ancient theatre which seats for than 20,000 people and considered the largest in Greece. Its good acoustics have made it a place for drama revivals in recent times.

Ancient Melitea & Erineo
Central Greece / Fthiotida

Near the modern town of Melitea which lies in the municipality of Domokos there are remains of ancient Melitea, as well as the archaeological site of Erineo in Petroto. Stelae and inscriptions from the area are displayed in the Archaeological Museum of Lamia.

Ancient Menelaida, Kastania
Thessaly & Sporades / Karditsa (Lake Plastira)

In Kastania, a resort village at an altitude of 800 metres near fir tree forest, there are remains of an ancient fortress, said to be remains of the ancient city of Menelaida.

Ancient Messene
Peloponnese / Messinia

The best-known and most extensive archaeological site in Messinia is the eponymous Messene. Founded by the Theban general in 369 BC, the ancient city of Messene offers a venerable archaeological treasure for visitors.

Ancient Methydrion, Vytina
Peloponnese / Arkadia

There are some ruins of Methydrion Here, including a temple dedicated to Poseidon Hypios. Not far off, the village of Valtetsiniko is said to be where Ancient Lousoi once stood.

Ancient Nafpaktos
Central Greece / Aitolo-Akarnania

East of modern-day Nafpaktos there are remains of the Asklipion, with temples or sanctuaries dedicated to Aphrodite, Artemsi and Poseidon. There are also remnants of an early Christian basilica.

Ancient Nestani, Mantineia
Peloponnese / Arkadia

On a small hill near the village of Nestani or Tsipiana there are remains of the Acropolis of Nostia (also Nostea or Nestani). The settlement was part of Ancient Mantineia in the 5th century BC. There are Pelasgian walls and parts of a wall tower, the only evidence of many towers that were part of the wall.

Ancient Nikopolis
Epirus / Preveza & Parga

The remains of ancient Nikopolis (victory city) can be found just 7 kilometres north of the city of Preveza. It was built to commemorate Octavian’s great naval victory at Aktion over the forces of Mark Antony and Cleopatra in 31 BC.At its height, more than 150,000 people resided here, most of which were forced to re-locate there from surrounding villages. The apostle Paul visited Nikopolis briefly and the philosopher Epictetus opened a school here. The city was sacked in 267 AD by the Goths and in 540 AD the Byzantine ruler Justinian re-fortified the walls. Many archaeologists and other researchers believe that modern day Preveza grew out of an extension of Nikopolis. The site is quite extensive, and many of its components are well –preserved, particularly the Roman Odeon. The remains of walls, theatres, temples to Poseidon and Ares, aqueducts, and baths can still be seen.

Ancient Odeion of Patras
Peloponnese / Achaia

The Odeion of Patras was constructed just before that of Herod Atticus in Athens, in 161 AD. Twelve rows of seats render this theatre impressive, along with the wall of its stage, stairways, parapet and more. It was unearthed only in 1889 and redressed in marble to host many concerts and shows in summer.

Ancient Oiniades
Central Greece / Aitolo-Akarnania

This ancient city used to be right next to the river, which changed its course over the millennia. The city dates from the 5th century BC at least, although its history is murky. The ancient theatre is in decent condition and worth a visit.

Ancient Oinoe, Kambos
North Aegean / Ikaria

The well-known city of Oinoe was once the island’s most important city and has been associated throughout the ages with the worship of Dionysus. Today, the ruins of ancient Oinoe include the area around the mouth of the river Voutside in the northern part of the island near the present-day village of Kambos.

Ancient Orraon
Epirus / Preveza & Parga

Located next to the village of Kastri Gymnotopou on a low hill just below Mount Xinovouno, lies this well-preserved site. It was one of the first cities of the Molossian tribe built around the mid 4th century BC. What’s left of it includes some stone walls and streets as well as a few stone houses, some of which have preserved second storeys (a rarity among surviving ancient structures.)

Ancient Palaiomanina near Astakos
Central Greece / Aitolo-Akarnania

Remains of the impressive walls of ancient Palaiomanina – stretching some 1,650 meters in length – date from the 4th century, and are partitioned into sections. Squared and trapezoidal rocks characterize this wall, complete with a 2-meter wide gate called Avloporta, an arch and horizontal beams. Beyond the walls there are tombs, cyclopean walls, evidence of homes from the copper age, remains from Mycenaean times, vaulted tombs, water cisterns, geometric burial jar, box-shaped graves from the classical years and much more.

Ancient Phthiotis in Stylida
Central Greece / Fthiotida

Remains from Achaean times of the ancient town of Phthiotis can be seen at Stylida, with the town hall hosting many finds from that era.

Ancient Platiana (Tipanai or Aipi)
Peloponnese / Ilia

The ruins of the ancient town (Tipanai or Aipi), occupied the hill of mount Lapitha on the southern part of the village Platiana, near Olympia. It is situated inland, some 17km from the Kiparissian bay.

Ancient Pleuron
Central Greece / Aitolo-Akarnania

Known also as the city of the Curetes, Ancient Pleuron was destroyed in 234 BC. It had a remarkable Hellenistic wall with seven gates and 36 towers. A cistern, small theatre, agora and acropolis lay within the walled city.

Ancient Potidaion or Posidaion, Pigadia
Dodecanese / Karpathos

This ancient city where the capital of Karpathos lies today thrived in Roman and early Christian times. However, it was inhabited as far back as the Neolithic and early bronze period, revealing a wide variety of remains and surprising finds.

Ancient Potneo (near Elati village)
Thessaly & Sporades / Trikala (Meteora, Pertouli)

Trace the region’s archaeological history by taking a walk around Elati. The area is dotted with remains of the ancient settlement of Potneo. Roam the village and you’ll no doubt find remnants of this once-great city.

Ancient Pyrassos
Thessaly & Sporades / Magnesia (Pelion)

Νea Anchialos is now built where ancient Pyrassos stood, a town with a temple of Demeter. Pyrassos changed its name to Fthiotides Thivaes before the Christian Era. The region was inhabited since prehistoric times. The citadel of ancient Pyrassos lies on a pine-clad hill.

Ancient quarries of Styria Lithos
Evia / Southern Evia

Sitting atop of Mt. Myteri, the ancient quarries of Styra look over today’s city and out to sea. There are still ancient roads leading up to where marble was transferred down the mountain and onto ships or other means of transport.

Ancient Rhodes and its Acropolis
Dodecanese / Rhodes (Rodos)

The ancient city was surrounded by walls encompassing a much greater area than that delineated by the existing medieval walls. Ruins of ancient walls are still visible throughout the Old Town.

Ancient Siris, the acropolis of modern Serres
Macedonia & Thrace / Serres

Mentioned by the historian Herodotus in the 5th century BC as ‘Siris,’ from the word sirios, meaning sun, the remains of the ancient acropolis and Byzantine tower overlook the modern city of Serres from its northern well-to-do pine-clad Koulas district. The Byzantine stronghold rose from the ruins of the ancient fortress built to defend the ancient city in 6th to 7th century BC. The city took its name from this later ‘castle,’ ‘Kastrini,’ while under Turkish occupation it was called ‘Bas Koule’ (top tower). The present name of the hill above the modern city, ‘Koulas’ is derived from that name.

Ancient Site of Palaiopolis
Ionian Islands / Corfu (Kerkyra)

Located approximately 2 km south of Corfu Town within the Mon Repos estate in the Kanoni area,Palaiopolis is the site of the ancient city of Corfu and includes the Ancient Agora (only a few sections are visible),the 6thC BC Doric Kardakio Temple dedicated to Poseidon or Askleipion,and Roman Baths built in the 1stC AD.

Ancient Skamneli
Epirus / Ioannina

Fragments of walls possibly dating back to the 8th century BC have been found outside the village of Skamneli. They are believed to be remnants of a fortification built by the Pelasgian tribe that inhabited these areas during that time.

Ancient Skilloundia (Trifilia)
Peloponnese / Ilia

The city of Trifilia is 3.5 km south of Olympia, where excavations revealed a settlement from the mid-Hellenistic period. The Ilians destroyed the twon in 572 BC and the Spartans dominated it around 400 BC before surrendering it to Xenophon. The latter established the temple of Artemis who protected hunting.

Ancient Skotousa, near Farsala, Larisa region
Thessaly & Sporades / Lake Karla & Mavrovouni

Skotousa stood over hills on the road between the villages of Ano Skotousa and Agia Triada. While not totally unearthed, current remains point out to long walls over 4 km with 44 square towers, 5 gates, a stadium and a theatre. Source:Farsala.gr

Ancient spring of Hypereia Krini
Thessaly & Sporades / Lake Karla & Mavrovouni

Mythology has it that the Goddess Hera bathed in the crystal, healing waters of this former spring in order to renew her virginity. The spring, located in the center of the ancient city, flowed abundantly since ancient times – ever since it was inhabited in 3000 B.C. – until 1998, when it suddenly dried out.

Ancient Stratos
Dodecanese / Aitolo-Akarnania

Between the Aheloos (Achelous) river and the village of Stratos lies a theatre that fits around 6,000 people and situated on a low slope, dating from the late 4th century. There is also a temple in the same location.

Ancient Temple of Klopedi (Agia Paraskevi Village)
North Aegean / Lesvos

Dating back to the 6th C, this beautiful temple is unique in terms of archaeological importance as it’s the only example of Aeolian architecture in Greece. It once held the Altar of Lesvos and was one of the most significant religious temples in Lesvos.

Ancient Teuthis, Dimitsana
Peloponnese / Arkadia

Near Dimitsana there are remains of cyclopean walls, an acropolis, and buildings from the classical era, which could be from the ancient city of Teuthis. The town reached its zenith in the Middle Ages, mentioned in Patriarchal documents in 963.

Ancient Theater of Pythagorio
North Aegean / Samos

The city’s ancient theater stands on a slope under Spiliani mountain. It was built during the Roman era and seems to have had a stagem orchestra pit and seating area.

Ancient theatre
Peloponnese / Argolida

The municipality of Argos also features a theatre built by Polycleitus sometime towards the end of the 5th century BC. It held possibly up to 20,000 people in 83 rows, and is considered the biggest of ancient Greece.

Ancient Therma, Katafygi
North Aegean / Ikaria

At a short distance just east of the present village of Therma, lie the ruins of the ancient city of Thermai, once well-known for its numerous hot springs and baths.

Ancient Thermo
Central Greece / Aitolo-Akarnania

Tucked deep into the mountainous and lake region, the remains of ancient Thermo include remains from the temples of Artemis Laphria and Apollo Thermios, in addition to a stoa, an agora, house foundations, prehistoric ellipse-like buildings and foundations of homes.

Ancient Thouria
Peloponnese / Messinia

Ancient Town of Sami (near Sami village)
Ionian Islands / Kefalonia

Take some time to explore the remains of what used to be an acropolis near Sami village – this Ancient Greek acropolis was also mentioned in Homer’s texts. Walls date back to the Hellenistic period, while there are also remains of a Roman theater and Roman baths nearby. Look for the mosaics as you explore.

Ancient Tragilos (Traelium), outside Aidonohori
Macedonia & Thrace / Serres

A small settlement of Bisaltia founded by colonists from Argilos in the 6th century BC. Its currency showed Hermes’ head and ears of barley or bunches of grapes. It was destroyed by invading Thracian or Galatian tribes and abandoned in the 3rd century BC.

Ancient Tritea
Central Greece / Fokida

Lying to the northwest of the bay of Itea at a height of 380 meters, the ancient settlement of Tritea was home to the Ozolians and the Lokrians as recently as 30 BC. At that time it fell under the dominion of the Roman Governor of Achaia. Some ruins remain near the new village of Kolopetinitsa.

Ancient Tritea in Kalentzi
Peloponnese / Achaia

Another member of the Achaian Cities, Tritea reached its zenith in the 3rd century BC, although little evidence remains. Around Vassilikos there are parts of an ancient building known as Palioklissi, while on Palataki hill there’s an underground building.

Ancient Vura, Egio
Peloponnese / Achaia

Lying over modern Egio (or Aegio) is Vura, which flourished after Eliki was destroyed. It was initially established by the Pelasgians who were followed by the Ionians. In 146 AD it fell under the Roman empire. Eventually the Byzantines, Franks Venetians and Ottomans all passed through. Not much remains form antiquity, but there are a couple of structures from the 4th and 5th century BC near the water tank and a cemetery from the Classical era, and Mycenaean tombs. Remains from an ancient theatre, some walls, temples and statues are also evident. The church of Agia Triada was built on remains of a temple, probably dedicated to the goddess Earth. Interestingly, a plane tree by the coast seems to be the same one Pausanias talked about in his travels.

Ancient Walls of Samos
North Aegean / Samos

The walls linining the hills of Ambelou (Kastri) in Kasteli, at a total length of 6430m with a circumference of 1,2km squared, in which a city was set up. Carved, rectangular blocks, weighing several tons each were the main materials used for construction. Parts of the walls from various eras can be found here; in some places there are parts that are attributed to the era of Polycrates (second half of the 6th century BC), while other parts are dated around 300 BC (Hellenistic period) and after a series of wars culminating in the defeat of Samos by the Athenians in 439 BC there was a need for new, more modern fortifications. The most impressive attribute of the walls is their sheer volume and the scope that went into creating them. Unfortunately, the condition of the walls has deteriorated significantly due to neglect and abuse by visitors. Only one sign on the roadside informs of the existence of ancient walls.

Anemospilia, Ano Archanes, Tourkogeitonia
Crete / Herakleion

There are three sites here, all of enormous importance. The so-called “Summer Palace” of Archanes, is visible in parts, though the exceptionally pleasant modern town covers most of it.

Antisa Archaeological Site (Scalohori Village)
North Aegean / Lesvos

History and archaeology buffs will enjoy exploring this site, with sprawled remains of a medieval fortress as well as pillars and marbles dating to earlier times. Walk around this site and hike down to the bays below for a refreshing dip before stopping by a seaside taverna for lunch.

Antrona and others, Municipality of Pelasgia
Central Greece / Fthiotida

Known as Larisa Kremaste or Larissa Pelasgia in old times, Pelasgia today shows evidence of the old settlement’s towns and surrounding walls from the 4th or 5th century BC. The archaeological site of Koumouli shows monuments and graves of the early Christian period between 323BC-30AD, plus impressive mosaics by the coast.

Aperi
Dodecanese / Karpathos

In the greater region of the village of Aperi there are remains of what today is known as the Castle of Aperi and of an ancient acropolis. The Tomb of Diogenis in Lori can also be found here.

Aptera
Crete / Hania

Within 15 or so kilometres east of Hania lie the remains of the hilltop town of Aptera with its breathtaking panoramic views. A very important archaeological site on Crete, Aptera is now run by the Greek Ministry of Culture, Department of Antiquities.

Archaeological Collection and Naval Museum of Galaxidi
Central Greece / Fokida

Two museums in one building, the Archaeological Collection of Galaxidi reflects life in antiquity including commerce, burial and more, with findings dating grom the Bronze age to the late antique period. In the same traditional building lies the Naval and Ethnological Museum which reflects the strong ties that this once flourishing maritime town has to the sea. Sea maps, model ships and paintings are on display here, as well as weapons from the war of independence.

Archaeological Collection of Thespies
Central Greece / Viotia

This collection is found in the town hall of the Thespies, where many findings are presented such as those from the archaeological area of the ancient city by the same name, architectural parts of the ancient city’s buildings, sculptures of classical years, and remains from the archaic and the roman years.

Archaeological finds (Kileler, Larissa)
Thessaly & Sporades / Lake Karla & Mavrovouni

Neolithic settlements and a broad variety of finds from the prehistoric and historic years were discovered in the area surrounding the village. Remnants from a mosque were found at the Tzami height, where a Myceanean tomb with significant finds was also unearthed.

Archaeological museum of Agrinion
Central Greece / Aitolo-Akarnania

The museum contains finds from the district of Aitolo-akarnania, ranging from the Prehistoric to the Roman periods. It was erected in 1960 and is a donation of the Papastratos brothers.

Archaeological Museum of Amorgos
Cyclades / Amorgos

Located in Hora, at the Pyrgos or else called Sala tou Gavra (Gavra’s Mansion), it features a wide range of archaeological findings from the whole island, dating from the early Bronze Age until the end of the ancient world.

Archaeological Museum of Argos
Peloponnese / Argolida

Discover collections from classical and prehistoric times from the area and beyond, dating from 2000 BC to 600 AD. Interesting finds from the Mycenaean and Neolithic periods (from 5000 to 1100 BC) are also on display, thanks to the efforts of the French Archaeological School and the American School of Classical Studies at Lerna.

Archaeological Museum of Atalanti
Central Greece / Fthiotida

Because this region was inhabited for thousands of years, there are many objects to appreciate at this museum. In addition, there is a mausoleum known as Hamaithanasis worth visiting nearby.

Archaeological Museum of Chaironeia
Central Greece / Viotia

Important sculptures from Livadia and Chaironia such as Demeter, Kyveli, a portrait of emperor Hadrian, a stone sphere with reliefs of the sun and moon, and Athena Kranaia can be seen at the museum. There are also ceramics from pre-historic locales around the area, including Mycenaean murals from Orchomenos, weapons and coins from Macedonia and a Theban tomb from the area. Recently more findings from roman, classical and Hellenic times have enriched the museum’s solid collection. Note the fine inscriptions and headstones from the area, and a tomb with a mosaic floor and many other interesting finds.

Archaeological Museum of Corinth
Peloponnese / Korinthia

Wander through Roman exhibits in 3 special showrooms and around the museum’s courtyard. The museum highlights the long history of Corinth starting from the Neolithic era until the Middle Ages.

Archaeological Museum of Delphi
Central Greece / Fokida

One of the most important museums in the country, displaying the history of Delphi and its powerful oracle. Stunning statues, architectural sculpture and gifts to the sanctuary are exhibited. They reflect the political, religious and artistic values of people around Ancient Greece and beyond from the 8th century BC until the late antique period. The greatest finds in this museum include the bronze charioteer from the 5th century BC, the gold and ivory heads of Artemis and Apollo, and the Roman copy of the Navel of the World (another name for Delphi).

Archaeological museum of Dilos
Cyclades / Dilos

The archaeological museum of Delos, was built in 1904 is considered one of the most important museums in Greece. It includes nine rooms with sculptures, bas-reliefs,  mosaics, vessels, jewels, objects of daily use, etc. Noteworthy are the statue of Apollo, the trunk of a Kouros from the temple of Apollo, the marble cluster of Voreas, the statues of Dioskouridis and his spouse Cleopatra, as well as the copper mask of Dionysus.

Archaeological Museum of Epidaurus
Peloponnese / Argolida

While some of the sculptures originally here were moved to the National Archaeological Museum in Athens and replaced by plaster versions, there’s still a lot to see. The museum houses healing inscriptions, hymns and votive sculptures, as well as several architectural parts of monuments from the sanctuary of Asclepius.

Archaeological Museum of Isthmia
Peloponnese / Korinthia

Right beside the site where many archaeological treasures were unearthed, this museum features all the finds and outstanding glass tableaus from 375 AD.

Archaeological Museum of Lamia
Central Greece / Fthiotida

Housed in a historic structure itself from the 1830s and built by King Otto, the Archaeological Museum of Lamia will walk you through ancient history from Neolithic times (starting from 6,500 BC) to Helladic/Mycenaean times, then to Geometric, Archaic and Classical/Hellenistic era. Finds from the later include metal objects, pottery, glass, figurines, children’s toys, jewellery, coins and sculptures. This museum is well worth the visit and is the focal point of the city, along with the castle.

Archaeological Museum of Mycenae
Peloponnese / Argolida

In the site of Mycenae itself, the museum unveils the life of the Mycenaeans and their burial customs. Curious findings from the graves are exhibited as well as objects from historical years and the Mycenaean civilization in general.

Archaeological Museum of Nauplion
Peloponnese / Argolida

Erected in 1713 by the Venetian Provider Sagredos, the museum features Mesolithic and Palaeolithic finds from as far back as 8000 BC. Some of these hail from the caves of Kefalari and Frachti and Kefalari, in addition to early Helladic finds from Asini, Tiryns and Berbati (2nd millennium BC.). There are also Mycenaean or late Helladic finds from different areas of the Peloponnese as well as from the Geometric era. Archaic and Roman finds are also in the museum, making it a very diverse one that is worth visiting.

Archaeological Museum of Nemea
Peloponnese / Korinthia

Right on site, the museum focuses on finds of the area and sheds light on its history, complementing the site where sadly not much remains.

Archaeological Museum of Olympia
Peloponnese / Ilia

Olympia boasts a sophisticated new museum containing some very old pieces indeed. Press the Read More link to discover its riches…

Archaeological Museum of Schimatari
Central Greece / Viotia

Constructed in 1890, this is the earliest museum in Viotia. It contains findings from the cemeteries of Tanagra or which had been retrieved in the field, and also finds from the first excavations conducted by the Archaeological Society. A large number of grave stelae where practically the only remains from illegal excavations. The exquisite clay figurines were smuggled outside the country in the early 1870s. Today the recently renovated museum reveals the art of Tanagra over time, important inscriptions and objects from prehistoric times to the early Christian period.

Archaeological Museum of Thebes
Central Greece / Viotia

Rare collections from around Viotia outline local civilization from Palaeolithic to post-Byzantine eras. There is also a medieval Frankish tower in the museum’s courtyard, once part of a castle erected by Nicholas II de Saint Omer, Archon of Thebes in 1278. The city’s northern gates may have stood at the very spot.

Archaeological Museum of Thyrreion, Vonitsa
Central Greece / Aitolo-Akarnania

The museum contains funerary stelae and other finds, mainly from the cemeteries of ancient Thyrreion and Anaktorion and various finds from the region of modern Vonitsa. Noteworthy are the marble funerary relief from the 4th century BC and an inscribed stele on the alliance between Thyrreans and Romans from 94 BC.

Archaeological Museum, Thermo
Central Greece / Aitolo-Akarnania

If you’re an ancient history buff, you’ll certainly enjoy the Mycenaean pots, inscriptions, clay figurines, Roman steles and other objects found in the regions of Chryssovitsa, as well as the temple of Apollo Thermios in ancient Calydon.

Archaeological site of Dimini
Thessaly & Sporades / Lake Karla & Mavrovouni

Just 5 km west of Volos and close to the village of Dimini lies a grand Neolithic settlement with a high level of urban sophistication dating from the 5th century BC.

Archaeological Site of Kambos, Kambos
North Aegean / Ikaria

The archaeological site of Kambos consists of the ancient area of Oinoe, which was inhabited from the Mycenaen Age to the Roman and early Byzantine eras. The centre of the site consists of the theatre, Roman aqueducts, and an early Byzantine building, bearing the name “Palaces”. The theatre is an example of impressively-built architecture of late antiquity, featuring stone masonry and large, stone arches.

Archaeological site of Sesklo
Thessaly & Sporades / Lake Karla & Mavrovouni

Around 15 km from Volos and set atop Kastraki hill you can find the well known Sesklo archaeological site. The Neolithic settlement of Sesklo was inhabited from the mid-7th till the 4th millenium B.C.

Archalochori
Crete / Herakleion

Archalochori lies 4KMs south of the palace of Galatas. A number of bronze artefacts were found here, though many more were lost, as locals finding the site and its booty in the 1950s, understandably melted them down for more pressing needs, such as modern agricultural us.

Archeological Museum, Avdera
Macedonia & Thrace / Xanthi

The first level of this historic museum focuses on the history of the city and relics excavated nearby. Another section covers mythology, research and books written by ancient writers from Xanthi. There are old maps too. Ancient artifacts of public and private life in Xanthi as well as grave sites.

Archeological site, Dimitriada
Thessaly & Sporades / Lake Karla & Mavrovouni

Lying just 1.5 km north of Volos, Dimitriada was founded in 294 BC by the King of the Macedonians Dimitrius Poliorkitis and named after him.

Area of Ancient Krannon, Krannonas Larisa region
Thessaly & Sporades / Lake Karla & Mavrovouni

Ancient Krannon near modern-day Krannonas was an important city from Pelasgian times, flourishing between the 6th-4th centuries BC. The site reveals pyramidal tombs, as well as pottery workshops and kilns. Tombs from the classical, Hellenistic and Roman periods have also been found in the area, including a cemetery from the Early Iron Age built on a prehistoric settlement. Higher up there are remains of an acropolis, while lower elevations feature remains of its agora.
Source: Diazoma

Argilos, or Argylos, west of Amphipolis
Macedonia & Thrace / Serres

The site along the coast was discovered in 1883 following the texts of Herodotus, who wrote that in 480 BC Persian general Xerxes conscripted the inhabitants of Argilos into his army. The city, overlooking the sea, was founded in the 7th century BC by settlers from Andros.

Armenoi, 8km south of Rethymnon
Crete / Rethymnon

A late Minoan cemetery whose importance is enormous, not least because of the uncertainty of where those being buried came from. The rock into which the tombs were cut is very hard, which must have made the digging of them difficult, but in turn has served to preserve them.

Aroniada
Central Greece / Evrytania

Ancient graves that haven’t been excavated to the full and remains of a fortress can be found at Aroniada

Artefacts from Ancient Athamanon at Leontito
Thessaly & Sporades / Karditsa (Lake Plastira)

Two kilometres from Leontito in the Athamanon area excavations have revealed artefacts probably belonging to the ancient Athamanon. There are also remains from the Middle Ages.

Asini
Peloponnese / Argolida

Near the picturesque seaside village of Asini lies the archaeological site by the same name. It features many Mycenaean tombs (the Barbouna necropolis) among others. The tombs are also known as the Barbouna necropolis. The remains of settlements date from pre-Mycenaean, Mycenaean, Geometric, Archaic and Hellenistic times. The citadel or acropolis and walls with a large tower belong to the Hellenistic period, i.e. from the third century BC. It was rebuilt during the Byzantine era.

Asklipion Trikkis Archaeological Park, Trikala Town
Thessaly & Sporades / Trikala (Meteora, Pertouli)

Remains of a temple dedicated to Asklipion Trikkis can be found here, and is thought to be a hospital founded by Asklipion.
Other important sites in the park include a building with gorgeous floor mosaics about Amvrosia who was a nurse-nymph and Lykourgos the Thracean King. Admire the Roman baths, as well as the remains of a 10thC Byzantine church.

The archaeological site is accessible after applying permission from the archaeological authorities.

Asklipios Sanctuary (outside Kos town)
Dodecanese / Kos

One of the most important archaeological sites in the world, this sanctuary dates to the 4thC BC and is found at the top of a lush hill surrounded by pine forests. It was the most important healing center in Ancient Greece and is extremely well-preserved. Built on three levels, you’ll explore the altar, temples and baths as well as where the priests and patients lived.

Askri in Thespies
Central Greece / Viotia

A defence tower dating back to the 4th century BC and part of more important fortifications are well preserved in Askri. The tower is said to be built by the people of Thespies to keep an eye on the Thebans, not long before the battle of Lefktra which took place in 371 BC.

Aspis
Peloponnese / Argolida

Across from the Panagia Katakekrymmeni, lies a round, wide hill that is about 80 metres high, reaching the Charadros River. Once upon a time this hill featured an acropolis with towers, the remains of which can still be seen. The acropolis on Aspis may even be older than that of the nearby Larissa (not to be confused with the city of the same name in central Greece). Visitors to Aspis may see an underground route that is about 20 metres long, which might be a cistern or a basement mentioned in the writings of Pausanias in connection to Danae and the oppressor of ancient Argos, Perilaos.

Athanasakeio Archaeological Museum, Volos
Thessaly & Sporades / Lake Karla & Mavrovouni

This is the most important in the region, dating from 1909. It features collections from prehistory to Roman years, such as ceramics, statues, bone tools and weapons. A collection of Neolithic figurines, clay models and vases, as well as gold jewellery are on display. Coins from Thessaly and other parts of the ancient Greek world are on display. A Mycenaean model of a chariot from the 13th Century BC, a gold necklace from ancient Pelinneon (3rd century BC) and representation of a tomb from the Protogeometric period (1050-900 BC) are also on display.

Avenue of lions
Cyclades / Dilos

West of the lake and next to the Litoo lies the most photographed and worldwide known as the symbol of the island, the Avenue of the Lions. The five marble Lions standing proud were originally 16. They were sculpted during the 7th century B.C. using Naxos marble, representing symbolic guardians of the Holy Lake. During the 17th century, the Venetians seized one, still found in the port of Venice.

Axos
Crete / Rethymnon

There’s not a great deal to see here, though vaulted tombs have been unearthed, dating back to around the end of the 13th century BC and the village and its environs has been in continuous occupation since then.

Basilica of St. George or Halinados Basilica (Halinados Region)
North Aegean / Lesvos

If you love exploring early Christian architecture, the remains of the Basilica of St. George is a must for you. Admire the masonry and you’ll be able to envision what this ancient basilica once looked like at its grandest, with its three aisles and elaborate roof.

Bassae (Vasses)
Peloponnese / Ilia

Another almost equally important ancient site in Greece is Bassae, where the Temple of Apollo Epicurus (Epikourios) lies. The temple is relatively well preserved but in danger of disintegrating due to the unstable ground underneath, which is why it is kept under a huge tent to protect it while under restoration. It was designed by Iktinos, the same architect who designed the Parthenon, and completed in 420 BC. The temple was dedicated to Apollo after he was considered to have saved the inhabitants of the area from an epidemic. Built at an altitude of 1131 meters, he temple is considered a great example of one that glorified the three styles of architecture during that era (Doric, Ionic, Corinthian).

Beehive/Tholos Tomb (near Tzanata village, close to Poros village)
Ionian Islands / Kefalonia

One of the most recent discoveries, this tomb housed Mycenaen kings in their afterlife and dates back to 1300 BC. One of the biggest beehive-type tombs reserved for Ancient Greek royalty in the region, it measures almost 7 meters in diameter, and is thought to be the grave of Odysseus himself. Gold jewelry which resembles Odysseus’ gold brooch as described in Homer’s poem was also found here.

Berenike
Epirus / Preveza & Parga

Recent evidence has led archaeologists to believe that the remains of a city on the Hill of Michalitsi just west of Preveza belong to the ancient settlement of Berenike. The city was built in 290 BC by the famous ruler of Epirus, King Pyrrhus and was named after his mother-in-law Bernice I of Egypt.

Berge or Berga, near modern Vergi
Macedonia & Thrace / Serres

Once an important trading centre of ancient Bisaltia, along the banks of the Strymonas, near the modern town of the same name, the city was colonized by settlers from Thassos island. Its influence fell off with the founding of Amphipolis but the city remained prosperous enough to have minted its own coins from 476 to 356, showing a carp and Silenus, the companion of wine god Dionysus. Not much of it remains, however.

Box-shaped graves in Apidia
Thessaly & Sporades / Karditsa (Lake Plastira)

The village of Apidia Village in the Kallifoni area (23 km from Karditsa and 11 km from the village of Kallifoni) lies on of 330 metres. Ancient box-shaped graves have been found in the Apidia district that link it with habitation in antiquity.

Bull of Oreoi
Evia / Northern Evia

This large statue of a bull was found buried at the beach of the modern day village of Oreoi in 1965. The large monument with a height surpassing 3 metres dates back to 290 – 280 BC. Today it is housed in a wooden and glass structure in Oreoi’s village square and is has remained remarkably well-preserved aside from its missing limbs and horns.

Byzantine bath of Valanio
Peloponnese / Ilia

There are ruins of a byzantine bath located in Fragoklisia, beside the banks of a small stream. The remains are hauntingly strange, today overgrown with foliage.

Byzantine baths of Loxada
Thessaly & Sporades / Karditsa (Lake Plastira)

In Loxada, there are Byzantine baths, which have yet to be excavated in full.

Byzantine remains in Diafani
Dodecanese / Karpathos

Above the picturesque village of Diafani with the island’s second port, there are remains of a Byzantine bath in an area known as Kampi. On higher ground there are remains of a Paleo-Christian basilica.

Cape Artemisio
Evia / Northern Evia

Sitting at Evia’s northernmost point, the treacherous waters surrounding this famous cape have meant disaster for sailors throughout antiquity until recent years.

Cape Lefkata (South-western tip of the island)
Ionian Islands / Lefkada

Believed to be the white cliffs mentioned in Homer’s Odyssey and the location of the Gates to the Underworld, it is also the place where the poetess Sappho took her own life. Although no remains exist, it is also the location of the Temple of Delfinos/Apollo, where sacrifices to the gods took place and where convicts plunged to their deaths as penance for their crimes.

Castle in Neo Monastiri, Municipality of Thessaliotida
Central Greece / Fthiotida

Right where ancient Proena was situated, the castle and temple to Demeter from the 4th century BC or Hellenistic times protected women and children from wars and invasions. The relatively well-preserved castle is called Ginekokastro or ‘Women’s Castle’ and lies on a hilltop. A pavilion displays finds from the area.

Castle of Kastriotissa
Central Greece / Fokida

In Kastriotissa, very much inland behind the Mornos lake and the highest village in the region at 1,260 meters, there are ruins of an ancient castle which lie at the southwest end of the village, as well as large blocks of stone from the era of the Ophioneis Aetolians. The town is named after the castle.

Castle of Mytilini (Mytilini Town)
North Aegean / Lesvos

Built in the 5thC by the Byzantine Emperor Justinian and then fortified by the Genoese and Venetians, it’s still so well preserved history and architecture buffs will be astounded. Admire the threshold’s tall wrought-iron gates and explore the many beautiful stone-built inner walls, traces of Roman, Byzantine, Genoese and Ottoman fortifications, turret and admirable Byzantine reservoir – enormous for its time.

Castle of Skiti
Thessaly & Sporades / Lake Karla & Mavrovouni

Here’s a large fortified settlement from the Byzantine period spread over 130,000 square meters, with exceptional views to the coast and the valley of Agia. This area was home to the Byzantine city of Centauropolis (Kentavropoli), with walls fortified by Justinian.

Much of the walls are from the Paliochristian period, showing small and large stones with plaster, reaching up to three meters in some places. On the eastern side there is another style wall with smaller pieces of brick and stone from the middle Byzantine period. Remains of a lone tower in ruins dominate the area to this day.

Source: Dimosagias

Castle of St. Maura (Lefkada Town)
Ionian Islands / Lefkada

Built in 1293 by John Orsini, a Frankish ruler, this architectural gem is one of the best examples of Medieval fortification in Greece. It’s surrounded by water and within its walls you can see the remains of Venetian buildings as well as visit the 15thC Church of St. Maura.

Castle of Velika, Larisa region
Thessaly & Sporades / Lake Karla & Mavrovouni

Once a fortification lying over 21,000 meters just north of Velika, this castle was strategic in surveying coastal settlements. Its walls are two meters thick and at some points three meters high. Source: Dimosagias

Cave of Andrea the Thief of Limeri, Moschato
Thessaly & Sporades / Karditsa (Lake Plastira)

Moschato is in the Plastiras municipality and is16 kilometres from Karditsa, located at an altitude of 450 metres. Near the village is the Cave of Andrea the Thief of Limeri. Surely there are legends surrounding this cave.

Cave of the Apocalypse (between Hora and Skala Towns)
Dodecanese / Patmos

Thousands of visitors visit this cave because of its religious significance, but it’s also a good example of the island’s archaeological past. Dating back to 95 AD, this stunning cave offers history buffs insight into one of the most important religious moments in history and the actual conditions that surrounded the creation of the Book of Revelation.

Cave Sanctuary of Pan
Athens & Nearby Islands / Athens City

You can almost picture Pan, the naughty nymph semi-god, running in and out of his little cave, conveniently located on the slopes of the Acropolis Hill within easy reach of all the goddesses and maidens who frequented the area.

Caves of Ipnon
Thessaly & Sporades / Magnesia (Pelion)

Remains of the ancient city of Ipnon lie near Horefto, a seaside village in Pelio. A sailboat can take you to the old Migela (Mitzela) and the old impressive caves at the ancient city of Ipnon.

Cemetary of Stamna
Central Greece / Aitolo-Akarnania

One of the biggest ancient cemeteries in Western Greece with rich archeological interest. The most important part was used for burial clusters in the flat areas northwest of the Etoliko lagoon.

Chrysoheria Castle, near Chora, Cave of 7 Virgins
Dodecanese / Kalymnos

Built by the Knights Templar in the 15thC, the remains of this castle will let you peek into Kalymnos’ medieval past. Seek out the coats-of-arms belonging to the Knights Templar, explore the Church of Panagia Chrysoheria – this is where a hoard of gold coins was rumored to be found under its floors.

Church of Christ of Jerusalem, near Chora/Pothia
Dodecanese / Kalymnos

This is part of Sanctuary of Delios Apollo. Here you’ll be able to admire the remains of two early Christian basilicas – the basilica of the Church of Christ of Jerusalem and the Church of Saint Sophia.

Clock tower of Davlia
Central Greece / Viotia

Not far from the village of Davlia, the four watermills stand witness to the prosperity of the area in history. Well preserved until now, the mills mechanisms and wheel are interesting to observe.

Colossus of Rhodes
Dodecanese / Rhodes (Rodos)

Built in celebration of the locals’ victory after a particularly difficult battle against the mighty Besieger Dimitrios. The statue, dedicated to the Sun God, was the work of the famous Lindian sculptor, Chares.

Corfu Archaeological Museum
North Aegean / Corfu (Kerkyra)

The museum’s exhibitions span the island’s archaeological history and feature the oldest surviving Greek pediment from the Temple of Artemis Gorgon, the exquisite Lion of Menecrates, and the busts of the historian Thucydides and the dramatist Menander. Other interesting artifacts include household tools and medical apparatus.

Davlia
Central Greece / Viotia

South of Davlia lie the ruins of the acropolis of ancient Davlia. Walls from the 4th century BC can be seen, with the base of these walls dating much further back to the Pelasgic era. Evidence of a tower belonging to the walls can be seen, as well as another tower built in medieval times is also on the site.

Delphi and the Oracle
Central Greece / Fokida

Arguably one of the most important spiritual focal points in antiquity worldwide, Delphi and its famed oracle are visited by thousands of tourists every month and it is well worth it. In summer it is best visited in the afternoon when there are less people and organized tours.

Dimini Archaeological Site
Thessaly & Sporades / Magnesia (Pelion)

The site of Dimini, located some 15km from Volos, is an important Late Neolithic settlement. There’s a Mycenaean tomb of the area’s Mycenaean and many other unique and interesting finds.

Distomo
Central Greece / Viotia

The prehistoric fortress of Distomo in Kastri dates back from Pelasgic times, i.e. ‘pre-Greek’ civilization. Ruins of a settlement and tombs from this era can be seen. Parts of the ancient wall of Amvrisos in the area can also be seen, as well as a royal tomb sculpted in the rock.

Dolopian walls at Leontari
Thessaly & Sporades / Karditsa (Lake Plastira)

Leontari (pronounced Leondari) is in the municipality of Tamasi. The name of the village is taken from that of King Leontio, who, according to ancient history, ruled the region and was the brother-in-law to the King of Rendina, Menelaus. Ancient walls of the Dolopons can be found at the border of the village.

Domokos
Central Greece / Fthiotida

Remains of homes from the Neolithic area can be seen on the hills of the area. There are remains of the ancient settlement of Tavmakos, cyclopean walls, a castle and a circular fortress called Stroggilokastro (meaining Round Castle).

Ancient Aigeira
Peloponnese / Achaia

Ancient travel writer Pausanias wrote about a temple dedicated to Artemis and one dedicated to Apollon, as well as statues of Agamemnon, Ifigeneia, Athena, Asclepius of Serapis and Isis.

Ancient Dymi and Olenos
Peloponnese / Achaia

Mystery had shrouded the true position of Dymi (also Dyme or Dimi) for some time, which in ancient literature was always paired with Olenos, both reputedly established some 4000 years ago. The Byzantines also had conflicting information about it.

Ancient Eliki
Peloponnese / Achaia

Known also as Helike, this ancient city near Aegio and the Selinus river lies today in the Municipality of Diakopto, where the idyllic village of Eliki is today. The old settlement was apparently destroyed by an earthquake and subsequent tsunami, with much ruins having sunk into the sea. Many ancients such as Siculus, Homer, Marcus Aurelius and of course Pausanias have referred to the city in their writings. The Temple of Elikonian Poseidon and others were noted at the site, which was officially discovered by archaeologists only in 2001. The site unveils evidence of destroyed buildings from the Classical era, as well as parts of the coastal Roman highway. Excavations of Eliki are also ongoing in the nearby village of Rizomylos.

Ancient Keryneia
Peloponnese / Achaia

Thanks to the efforts of the English Archaeological School, the move to unearth monuments from the Hellenistic era as well as a cemetery belonging to this ancient city have shed light on the site of Keryneia.

Ancient Kleitora and Azania
Peloponnese / Achaia

In Ano Kleitoria near the town of Lefkasi there are remains of the city of Azania. There is little remaining of the ancient walls surrounding the city, but relatively recently parts of the ancient theatre and more fortifications have emerged.

Ancient Klitoras in Klitoria
Peloponnese / Achaia

Once a thriving city with over 60,000 people and one of the first to be established, all that is left of Klitoras now are parts of walls, a theatre and a few buildings from Hellenistic and Roman times.

Ancient Lousoi
Peloponnese / Achaia

It was the Austrian Archaeological Institute and its work around this site that have revealed the remains of an important Arcadian city, lying in the Municipality of Kalavrita in the village of Soudena or Lousoi. Notable among the finds is the Temple of Artemis, dating back from the third century BC. Remains of the parliament, entrance and fountain, as well as a notable house with its courtyard are also visible. The location of the acropolis has also been determined, but not yet excavated.

Ancient Odeion of Patras
Peloponnese / Achaia

The Odeion of Patras was constructed just before that of Herod Atticus in Athens, in 161 AD. Twelve rows of seats render this theatre impressive, along with the wall of its stage, stairways, parapet and more. It was unearthed only in 1889 and redressed in marble to host many concerts and shows in summer.

Ancient Tritea in Kalentzi
Peloponnese / Achaia

Another member of the Achaian Cities, Tritea reached its zenith in the 3rd century BC, although little evidence remains. Around Vassilikos there are parts of an ancient building known as Palioklissi, while on Palataki hill there’s an underground building.

Ancient Vura, Egio
Peloponnese / Achaia

Lying over modern Egio (or Aegio) is Vura, which flourished after Eliki was destroyed. It was initially established by the Pelasgians who were followed by the Ionians. In 146 AD it fell under the Roman empire. Eventually the Byzantines, Franks Venetians and Ottomans all passed through. Not much remains form antiquity, but there are a couple of structures from the 4th and 5th century BC near the water tank and a cemetery from the Classical era, and Mycenaean tombs. Remains from an ancient theatre, some walls, temples and statues are also evident. The church of Agia Triada was built on remains of a temple, probably dedicated to the goddess Earth. Interestingly, a plane tree by the coast seems to be the same one Pausanias talked about in his travels.

Fortress of Patras
Peloponnese / Achaia

The castle-fortress of Patras was built in the 6th century A.D. by Justinian where an ancient acropolis once stood. The castle repelled the Slavs, Saracens and even Normans who surrounded the city and helped thwart the invasion of the Peloponnese.

Mycenaean Settlement near Chalandritsa
Peloponnese / Achaia

Near the town of Chalandritsa and Agios Georgios, while excavating to build a health centre in 1985, remains from a Mycenaean settlement emerged. Interesting is how the buildings were placed in concentric rings, with the streets emanating from the centre. There are more ruins, tombs and a megaron atop a nearby hill.

Patras Roman Aqueduct
Peloponnese / Achaia

After designating Patras as a Roman colony and a gateway to Italy in 31 BC, the Roman emperors built an 6.5-kilometer-long aqueduct to support the city’s population. A water reservoir was also constructed by damming part of the Romanos River. Remains of the dam can still be seen within the riverbed.

Kolona
Athens & Nearby Islands / Aegina Island

The remains of a Neolithic settlement have been found on the hill of Kolona just one kilometer northwest of Aegina Town.

Temple of Aphaia
Athens & Nearby Islands / Aegina Island

This magnificent Doric temple lies just 2 kilometers east of Mesagros on a hill overlooking the turquoise waters of the sea. Impressively 24 of its 34 columns remain, making it one of the best preserved ancient sanctuaries in all of Greece. It was built sometime between 500-480 and its pediments contained scenes of the Greek victory in the Trojan War.

Temple of Apollo
Athens & Nearby Islands / Aegina Island

The remains of this 6th century sanctuary lie atop the hill of Kolona. It only contains one column, which gives the entire site its name (kolona means column in Greek). The temple itself was rectangular and comprised of 6 columns width-wise and 11 lengthwise. The site also boasts the remains of a temple to Artemis and an archaic cemetery containing graves in which gold jewelry was found.

Temple of Zeus
Athens & Nearby Islands / Aegina Island

The evocative ruins of this Temple to Zeus lie on top of Mt. Ellanio (also locally known as Oros). The mythical King of Aegina, Aiokos, appealed to the God to send rain during a long drought on the island.

Alikyrna
Central Greece / Aitolo-Akarnania

This ancient city from the 4th century before Christ came to light while excavating the Ionia Odos highway recently. Its foundations can be seen near the community of Hilia Spitia.

Ancient Alyzia (or Alyzea)
Central Greece / Aitolo-Akarnania

When at Mikitas ask how to get to the remains of Alyzia, considered one of the most important cities of Akarnania in ancient times.

Ancient Anaktorion
Central Greece / Aitolo-Akarnania

Excavations haven’t been undertaken at the area (Agios Petros) where Anaktorion lies, but there are remains of the city’s surrounding walls and ancient temples (on a nearby hill there are ruins of a medieval castle and an old church).

Ancient Kalydona (Lafreaio) near Mesolongi
Central Greece / Aitolo-Akarnania

Here was a highly important Aetolian sanctuary dedicated to Apollo and Artemis. It is located southwest of the site’s acropolis and was in use up to Roman times. There used to be a chryselephantine statue of Artemis in the sanctuary and a tomb for the hero Leon. Excavations where done by Greece and Denmark in the 1930s.

Ancient Koronta
Central Greece / Aitolo-Akarnania

Not far from the village of Chysovitsa are remains from the ancient town of Koronta, including Mycenaean graves, Cyclopean walls a reservoir and evidence of a castle. There was a Doric-style temple built in honour of an unidentified female godess, as well as remains of different buildings. Although the site was robbed many times, several artefacts were found and are now in the museum of Agrinio. They include golden wreaths, copper knives, a golden pig and many other objects.

Ancient Nafpaktos
Central Greece / Aitolo-Akarnania

East of modern-day Nafpaktos there are remains of the Asklipion, with temples or sanctuaries dedicated to Aphrodite, Artemsi and Poseidon. There are also remnants of an early Christian basilica.

Ancient Oiniades
Central Greece / Aitolo-Akarnania

This ancient city used to be right next to the river, which changed its course over the millennia. The city dates from the 5th century BC at least, although its history is murky. The ancient theatre is in decent condition and worth a visit.

Ancient Palaiomanina near Astakos
Central Greece / Aitolo-Akarnania

Remains of the impressive walls of ancient Palaiomanina – stretching some 1,650 meters in length – date from the 4th century, and are partitioned into sections. Squared and trapezoidal rocks characterize this wall, complete with a 2-meter wide gate called Avloporta, an arch and horizontal beams. Beyond the walls there are tombs, cyclopean walls, evidence of homes from the copper age, remains from Mycenaean times, vaulted tombs, water cisterns, geometric burial jar, box-shaped graves from the classical years and much more.

Ancient Pleuron
Central Greece / Aitolo-Akarnania

Known also as the city of the Curetes, Ancient Pleuron was destroyed in 234 BC. It had a remarkable Hellenistic wall with seven gates and 36 towers. A cistern, small theatre, agora and acropolis lay within the walled city.

Ancient Stratos
Dodecanese / Aitolo-Akarnania

Between the Aheloos (Achelous) river and the village of Stratos lies a theatre that fits around 6,000 people and situated on a low slope, dating from the late 4th century. There is also a temple in the same location.

Ancient Thermo
Central Greece / Aitolo-Akarnania

Tucked deep into the mountainous and lake region, the remains of ancient Thermo include remains from the temples of Artemis Laphria and Apollo Thermios, in addition to a stoa, an agora, house foundations, prehistoric ellipse-like buildings and foundations of homes.

Archaeological museum of Agrinion
Central Greece / Aitolo-Akarnania

The museum contains finds from the district of Aitolo-akarnania, ranging from the Prehistoric to the Roman periods. It was erected in 1960 and is a donation of the Papastratos brothers.

Archaeological Museum of Thyrreion, Vonitsa
Central Greece / Aitolo-Akarnania

The museum contains funerary stelae and other finds, mainly from the cemeteries of ancient Thyrreion and Anaktorion and various finds from the region of modern Vonitsa. Noteworthy are the marble funerary relief from the 4th century BC and an inscribed stele on the alliance between Thyrreans and Romans from 94 BC.

Archaeological Museum, Thermo
Central Greece / Aitolo-Akarnania

If you’re an ancient history buff, you’ll certainly enjoy the Mycenaean pots, inscriptions, clay figurines, Roman steles and other objects found in the regions of Chryssovitsa, as well as the temple of Apollo Thermios in ancient Calydon.

Cemetary of Stamna
Central Greece / Aitolo-Akarnania

One of the biggest ancient cemeteries in Western Greece with rich archeological interest. The most important part was used for burial clusters in the flat areas northwest of the Etoliko lagoon.

Ithoria
Central Greece / Aitolo-Akarnania

The remains of Ancient Ithoria are next to the community of Agios Ilias in the Aitoliko region. Archeologists have found tombs from the Mycenaean and Geometric eras, with many artefacts now in the Archeological Museum of Agrinio.

Medieval castle ruins at Agios Petros
Central Greece / Aitolo-Akarnania

The coastal road beyond Paleros goes inland towards Vonitsa (built where ancient Anaktorion is) on the Amvarkikos Gulf. In this area, the hills above Agios Petros feature walls and ruins from ancient temples, but also significant remains of a medieval castle near the notable 12th century church of Divine Wisdom.

Roman Baths
Central Greece / Aitolo-Akarnania

A collection of baths from the Roman era in Agios Ioannis not far from Mesolongi. Visitors can see remains of a well, bathing chambers, changing rooms and a sudatorium.

Theatre Of Makyneia
Central Greece / Aitolo-Akarnania

Close to Paliokastro Mamakou near modern-day Makyneia, there are remains of a small theatre lying at the food of a fortified hill, considered part of Aitolian Makyneia. The theatre is of unusual shape, with originally 14 rows of seats and an adjacent linear wing of 3 rows. It dates back to the late fourth century BC. The ancient theaters of Makyneia, Plevronas, Oiniades and Stratou are still found at the same location where the great namesake cities flourished.

No Archeology Found In This Destination. Please Check Other Destinations.
Archaeological Museum of Amorgos
Cyclades / Amorgos

Located in Hora, at the Pyrgos or else called Sala tou Gavra (Gavra’s Mansion), it features a wide range of archaeological findings from the whole island, dating from the early Bronze Age until the end of the ancient world.

No Archeology Found In This Destination. Please Check Other Destinations.
Palaeopolis
Cyclades / Andros

Visit Palaeopolis south of Batsi, built on the ancient capital of Andros on the slopes of the mountain Petalo, in the position of the ancient capital of Andros. This coastal settlement features a lot of green and is of great archaeological interest from Classical to Roman times with ruins, temples and streets. Objects from the market, jewellery, vessels, sculptures, etc. have been found, and are exhibited in the archaeological museum of Palaeopolis. The museum also contains ceramic and stone tools from the Geometric settlement of Zagora.

Ypsili
Cyclades / Andros

Discover the archaeological site of Ypsili, which belongs to the Geometric period, at Kato Aprovatou with ruins of a settlement and a fortified citadel. A temple was excavated at the centre of the citadel, dating from the Archaic period (6th century B.C.). The double altar and the discoveries imply that the temple was probably a place of double adoration, perhaps of Dimitra and Persephone. The citadel also reveals evidence from four different phases in history, i.e. from the Geometric to the Hellenistic and Roman periods. The
settlement was mostly abandoned by the end of the 8th century B.C., although there was some limited activity after that.

Ancient theatre
Peloponnese / Argolida

The municipality of Argos also features a theatre built by Polycleitus sometime towards the end of the 5th century BC. It held possibly up to 20,000 people in 83 rows, and is considered the biggest of ancient Greece.

Archaeological Museum of Argos
Peloponnese / Argolida

Discover collections from classical and prehistoric times from the area and beyond, dating from 2000 BC to 600 AD. Interesting finds from the Mycenaean and Neolithic periods (from 5000 to 1100 BC) are also on display, thanks to the efforts of the French Archaeological School and the American School of Classical Studies at Lerna.

Archaeological Museum of Epidaurus
Peloponnese / Argolida

While some of the sculptures originally here were moved to the National Archaeological Museum in Athens and replaced by plaster versions, there’s still a lot to see. The museum houses healing inscriptions, hymns and votive sculptures, as well as several architectural parts of monuments from the sanctuary of Asclepius.

Archaeological Museum of Mycenae
Peloponnese / Argolida

In the site of Mycenae itself, the museum unveils the life of the Mycenaeans and their burial customs. Curious findings from the graves are exhibited as well as objects from historical years and the Mycenaean civilization in general.

Archaeological Museum of Nauplion
Peloponnese / Argolida

Erected in 1713 by the Venetian Provider Sagredos, the museum features Mesolithic and Palaeolithic finds from as far back as 8000 BC. Some of these hail from the caves of Kefalari and Frachti and Kefalari, in addition to early Helladic finds from Asini, Tiryns and Berbati (2nd millennium BC.). There are also Mycenaean or late Helladic finds from different areas of the Peloponnese as well as from the Geometric era. Archaic and Roman finds are also in the museum, making it a very diverse one that is worth visiting.

Asini
Peloponnese / Argolida

Near the picturesque seaside village of Asini lies the archaeological site by the same name. It features many Mycenaean tombs (the Barbouna necropolis) among others. The tombs are also known as the Barbouna necropolis. The remains of settlements date from pre-Mycenaean, Mycenaean, Geometric, Archaic and Hellenistic times. The citadel or acropolis and walls with a large tower belong to the Hellenistic period, i.e. from the third century BC. It was rebuilt during the Byzantine era.

Aspis
Peloponnese / Argolida

Across from the Panagia Katakekrymmeni, lies a round, wide hill that is about 80 metres high, reaching the Charadros River. Once upon a time this hill featured an acropolis with towers, the remains of which can still be seen. The acropolis on Aspis may even be older than that of the nearby Larissa (not to be confused with the city of the same name in central Greece). Visitors to Aspis may see an underground route that is about 20 metres long, which might be a cistern or a basement mentioned in the writings of Pausanias in connection to Danae and the oppressor of ancient Argos, Perilaos.

Larissa Acropolis
Peloponnese / Argolida

Not to be confused with the city by the same name, and lying at an elevation of almost 290 metres, Larissa represents the Acropolis of Argos. Not to be confused with the city by the same name, and lying at an elevation of almost 290 metres, Larissa represents the Acropolis of Argos, possibly named after the ancient Pelasgos’ daughter. Protecting the entrance to the plain of Argolis, this natural fort was not surprisingly used by the Romans, Byzantines, Franks, Venetians and Ottomans. There are four cisterns and a wall from more recent years around the acropolis, which used to be surrounded by older Cyclopean walls. This is where history and mythology start blending. An underground passage some 3,000 steps in length lies under Larissa, with two caves. The church of Agia Marina from 1859 AD was constructed on the remnants of the temple of Zeus of Larissa. Another church on the slopes of Larissa, that of Panagia Katakekrymmeni, is built near where the ancient temples of Athena Oxyderkis and Pythaeus Apollo are. The ancient sanctuary of Acraia Hera is also visible at Larissa, so the temple of Apollo, considered the first to be first built by Pythaeus of Delphi.

Mycenae
Peloponnese / Argolida

Long before the ancient Greek philosophers and the battles of Athens and Sparta ever took place, more than a thousand years before these events, there was another powerful and intriguing civilization of Greece belonging to the Mycenaeans.

Serapis
Peloponnese / Argolida

Near Argos lies a site to worship the Greek-Egyptian god Serapis established during Hellenistic times under the Ptolemaic dynasty. Considered the guardian of medicine and the saviour god, Serapis enjoyed popularity of the peoples in Argolis.

Temple of Asclepius
Peloponnese / Argolida

Also known as the temple of Asclepius, this site was a religious and curative centre (as revealed in the poems of Pindaros), an anceint holistic and spiritual centre. It used katakoimisis as a cure (sleeping until the god visited patients during sleep to reveal treatment) but the treatments evolved. The other important Aesculapium in Argolida is the temple of Epidaurus.

Tirintha
Peloponnese / Argolida

Visitors will marvel at the huge boulders that may remind British and Irish visitors of the Gaelic dolmens. Myth has it that the boulders were created by the Cyclops (Kiklopi in Greek). The cyclops were the only beings who could move them with their strength. Tirintha shows evidence of being inhabited since the Neolithic era, i.e. around 1400 BC when the outer walls were built (a full century before Mycenae). It was soon thereafter burnt down and rebuilt by the Dorians who invaded the area.

Ancient Asea or Sapiko, near Sapolivado
Peloponnese / Arkadia

At the beginning of the plain of Asea in today’s Sapolivado (Sapiko in Byzantine times) there are remains of the area’s old acropolis.

Ancient Brasiae near Agios Andreas
Peloponnese / Arkadia

This may be the site of Ancient Brasiae or Brasias with remains of a very ancient acropolis lying on the hill above Agios Andreas, with ruins from Palasgian times. Graves from different periods are also present.

Ancient Dipaea, Piana
Peloponnese / Arkadia

Near the village of Piana where the waters of the Elisson or Davia River run, there are remains of the ancient city of Dipaea. There’s also a medieval castle.

Ancient Iraea near Ayios Ioannis
Peloponnese / Arkadia

Loutra Iraeas near the Ladonas bridge has sulphur springs which may have been popular in antiquity. Very good mosaics are present in what used to an ancient bathhouse, in an area known also as Liadora. The ruins of Ancient Iraea (built by Iraeus, son of Lycaon) are found south of here, near Ayios Ioannis on the banks of the Alfeos river. The city, which had two temples dedicated to Dionysus and an edifice for orgies, was also home of the famous athlete Damaretos (who was victorious in the armed race at the Olympics).

Ancient Lykosoura, Megalopolis
Peloponnese / Arkadia

Overlooking the plain of Megalopolis, Lykosoura is a very ancient holy city with remains from temples dedicated to Despoina, Demeter and the Great Mother, one dating from the 4th century BC.

Ancient Mantineia, Gourtsouli Hill
Peloponnese / Arkadia

Just 10 km from Tripoli in the plain of Milia lie the remains of Ancient Mantineia (or Mantinea) and its acropolis. There are traces of temples, a theatre, an agora and other buildings. A strange doorless sanctuary dedicated to Poseidon also existed here.

Ancient Megalopolis, Megalopolis
Peloponnese / Arkadia

Having gathered settlers from all over Arkadia, Megalopolis offered temples to many gods such as Zeus, Asclepius, the Mother of the Gods and more. Its ruins include the Stoa of Philippos, Sanctuary of Zeus Soter, Stoa of Myropolis and a Bouleterion. There was also an ancient theatre which seats for than 20,000 people and considered the largest in Greece. Its good acoustics have made it a place for drama revivals in recent times.

Ancient Methydrion, Vytina
Peloponnese / Arkadia

There are some ruins of Methydrion Here, including a temple dedicated to Poseidon Hypios. Not far off, the village of Valtetsiniko is said to be where Ancient Lousoi once stood.

Ancient Nestani, Mantineia
Peloponnese / Arkadia

On a small hill near the village of Nestani or Tsipiana there are remains of the Acropolis of Nostia (also Nostea or Nestani). The settlement was part of Ancient Mantineia in the 5th century BC. There are Pelasgian walls and parts of a wall tower, the only evidence of many towers that were part of the wall.

Ancient Teuthis, Dimitsana
Peloponnese / Arkadia

Near Dimitsana there are remains of cyclopean walls, an acropolis, and buildings from the classical era, which could be from the ancient city of Teuthis. The town reached its zenith in the Middle Ages, mentioned in Patriarchal documents in 963.

Episkopi at Tegea
Peloponnese / Arkadia

Excavations have revealed parts of a theatre from the Hellenistic period (175 BC), an agora from the Hellenistic and Roman period, two early Christian basilicas (5th-6th century AD), amazing mosaic floors and parts of a Byzantine settlement (10th-13th century AD). In the middle ages the area was called Nikliou.

Kaphyes (Kafyes), Mantineia
Peloponnese / Arkadia

The remains of a prehistoric settlement have been found in the area of ​​Kafyes.

Mansion of Herod Atticus, Astros
Peloponnese / Arkadia

Arkadia is home to the luxurious mansion of Herod Atticus with fine sculptures, amazing statues and intricate mosaics with intricate shapes, found at Eva in Astros. The Loukous Monastery is located nearby.

Mycenaean Cemetary, Palaiokastro
Peloponnese / Arkadia

Around 100 rock-cut tombs of different types (chambers, tholoi, pit-graves, well-shaped graves, etc.) and a temple for religious ceremonies have been uncovered here from the late Mycenaean era, matching Homeric texts about Necyia in the Iliad. The sites artefacts are at the Archaeological Museum of Tripoli.

Orchomenos, Levidi
Peloponnese / Arkadia

Prehistoric Orchomenos was founded at the foot of the Acropolis and later during historic times moved up to the mountain where its most important monuments (Agora, Theatre, etc) are also situated. The plain shows prehistoric drainage infrastructure, a prehistoric tumulus bridge, and a prehistoric settlement at the Katalymata site. The modern site shows evidence of an agora, bouleuterion, walls, and hekatompedon temple of Mesopolitidos Artemis. At the Mytikas site there are remains of a Mycenaean settlement and ancient sanctuary of Palaiopyrgos. There’s also an ancient sanctuary – followed by an early Christian Basilica – between Orchomenos and Palaiopyrgos in Mantinea.

Sanctuary of Alea Athena, Tegea
Peloponnese / Arkadia

Going back to the the first half of the 4th century BC, this temple is the largest in the Peloponnese after that of Olympian Zeus in Olympia. There are remains of another temple under it from the Archaic period, as well as of a Byzantine basilica from much later.

Steno and Agiorgitika, Korithio
Peloponnese / Arkadia

Α huge metallurgical kiln, which is considered the largest kiln of Prehistoric times (before 2000 BC) was found in this area, along with washing facilities, tanks and workshops, and interestingly from the Roman period as well have been revealed at the site. The kiln was used for melting and improving copper ores. In Roman times the kilns were probably used to remelt metal scrap.

Tavia at Mount Mainalo
Peloponnese / Arkadia

The medieval town of Tavia boasts remains of buildings and a castle, supposedly built with stones from Dipaia, a more ancient site.

Acharnian Gate of the Ancient Athens Wall
Athens & Nearby Islands / Athens City

Like many cities in antiquity, Ancient Athens was surrounded by a wall and featured different gates to access the city. The location of the Acharnian Gate – the gate that leads to the town of Acharnes north of the city – was initially lost in time.

Acropolis, Athens
Athens & Nearby Islands / Athens City

Welcome to the Parthenon on the Acropolis Hill, one of the world’s most important structures, considered a true symbol of civilization and democracy that has been standing for 2,500 years. Even in the stone age (Neolithic period), millennia before the Parthenon was built, the Acropolis represented a military fortress, thanks to its strategic vantage point over land and sea.

Amphiareion, North Attica
Athens & Nearby Islands / Athens City

One of the less known gods of mythology, Amphiaraos was a deity of healing. He emerged from a spring near the temple on the Northern border of Attica. This is also an ancient Doric temple that fits 3000 people dating from the 4th century BC. Other ruins in the area are from the 6th century BC.

Cave Sanctuary of Pan
Athens & Nearby Islands / Athens City

You can almost picture Pan, the naughty nymph semi-god, running in and out of his little cave, conveniently located on the slopes of the Acropolis Hill within easy reach of all the goddesses and maidens who frequented the area.

Elefsina (Eleusis)
Athens & Nearby Islands / Athens City

Founded in the in the 2nd millennium BC, Eleusis was where the Eleusinian mysteries took place, an initiation rite into a mystic order. In antiquity Athenians marched here by foot.

Greek Agora in Plaka
Athens & Nearby Islands / Athens City

Welcome to what was once the heart of public life in Classical Athens and where democracy was born, according to historians. The Greek Agora (as opposed to the Roman Agora not far off) was represented by a bustling open square that saw many fine buildings emerge around it, from temples and fountain houses to administrative offices and stoas (covered porticos or walkways for the public).

Hadrian’s Arch, Downtown Athens
Athens & Nearby Islands / Athens City

Like a Roman triumphal arch and lying just 325 meters (almost 1070 feet) from the Acropolis, this impressive gateway once lay over an ancient road and was most probably built to celebrate the arrival of Roman Emperor Hadrian to Athens.

Kerameikos, Athens
Athens & Nearby Islands / Athens City

Kerameikos – the combined ancient ceramic quarter and necropolis – might not be as famous as the Acropolis and Agora, but it is well worth a visit.

Lysicrates Monument, Plaka area
Athens & Nearby Islands / Athens City

Here’s an ancient architectural marvel dating from 335 BC that was replicated many times in British and French gardens over the last few centuries, with renditions reaching the US and Australia as well. The Lysicrates Monument in the Plaka area was commissioned by Lysicrates, a rich patron of artistic performances, to honor a prize-winning performance that he had sponsored.

Marathon Warriors’ Tomb, Marathonas
Athens & Nearby Islands / Athens City

The battle of Marathon is where the outnumbered Greeks won the Persian invaders in 490 BC. Near the field lies the monument and tomb of the 192 Athenian soldiers who were killed in battle. On the other side of the road 5km away is the grave of the Plataians, also allies of the Athenians in battle.

Monastiraki Metro Display
Athens & Nearby Islands / Athens City

Below one of the busiest squares in Athens today, Monastiraki Square, lies a fascinating discovery that came to light only a couple of decades ago.

Odeon of Herod Atticus, Acropolis
Athens & Nearby Islands / Athens City

The word ‘ode’ gives us the term Odeon – Odeum in Latin – which represents a collection of buildings built for musical performances or poetry competitions.

Panathenaic stadium (Kalimarmaro)
Athens & Nearby Islands / Athens City

Imagine a 2,000 year old stadium that could hold 50,000 people, representing a true architectural marvel for its time.

Philoppapou Monument Hill
Athens & Nearby Islands / Athens City

A young monument on Ancient Greek standards that’s just 19 centuries old, Monument was built in 116 AD on a hill to commemorate Gaius Julius Antiochus Epiphanes Philopappus,

Pnyx hill
Athens & Nearby Islands / Athens City

While not much remains of the structures that were once there, the Pnyx is one of the most significant sites of Classical Greece for what it stands for.

Ramnous (Kato Souli, near Marathon coast)
Athens & Nearby Islands / Athens City

Known for its port area and fort in antiquity, the area hosts two temples dedicated to Nemesis and to Themis, both goddesses of justice. The remains of a fort, funerary monuments, walls, theatre and homes are still apparent. Local finds include statues of Artemis and Pan. Enjoy the great sea views too.

Roman Agora, Athens
Athens & Nearby Islands / Athens City

Around the time of Christ, the new Roman Agora established itself as the center of activity in Roman-controlled Athens, especially since the Ancient Greek Agora had long become a historic relic by then.

Roman Agora, Hadrian’s Library
Athens & Nearby Islands / Athens City

Here’s an excellent reminder of the level of knowledge and education that existed some 2000 years ago. Hadrian’s Library, built in 132 AD, was a repository for rolls of papyrus – the equivalent of books then – and state archives.

Roman Bath, Amalias Avenue
Athens & Nearby Islands / Athens City

You wouldn’t suspect that the lush, serene national gardens of Syntagma (which were the Royal Gardens of King Otto and Queen Amalia a few decades back) were the site of sophisticated Roman Bathhouse.

Temple & theatre of Dionysus, South Slope of Acropolis
Athens & Nearby Islands / Athens City

On the slopes of the Acropolis lie the the Sancutary of Dionysus Eleuthereus and theatre, among the most ancient in the world. It featured plays from Euripides, Sophocles, Aeschylus and more. Nearby is the Odeion of Herod Atticus, another theatre used today for events.

Temple of Hephaestus, Thisseo
Athens & Nearby Islands / Athens City

Archaeologists thought that Thisseus was buried here, but turns out it was Hephaestus. This is actually Athens’ best preserved temple and worth a visit, along with the nearby Stoa of Attalos and the museum. The temple was built in 460-415 BC. It once held statues of Athena and Hephaestus.

Temple of Olympian Zeus
Athens & Nearby Islands / Athens City

This is older than the acropolis dating from the 6th century BC, built under Hippias and Hipparchos. It remained unfinished until the Emperor Hadrian completed it some 700 years later in 131 AD. The original was huge, boasting 104 columns of which only 15 remain today.

Temple of Poseidon, Sounion
Athens & Nearby Islands / Athens City

This is where ancient Greeks worshipped Poseidon, god of the sea. Fifteen of the temple’s 34 columns still remain. It was built in the Golden Age of Pericles on the ruins of another temple. A smaller temple of Athena lies 400 meters away, built around 600-550 BC.

Tower of the winds/ Aerides, Plaka area
Athens & Nearby Islands / Athens City

Lying within the Roman Agora, this monument is also known as the horlogeion, meaning water clock. Most believe the octagonal structure depicting the ‘winds’ in amazing detail was built as a sundial. There used to be a mechanism inside to operate the water clock.

Underground ruins, Kotzia Square
Athens & Nearby Islands / Athens City

Right in front of the attractive neoclassical National Bank of Greece building, this site which lies just beyond the ancient city walls reveals three streets and a cemetery dating from the 9th century BC until the third century AD.

Vravrona, near Markopoulo/Porto Rafti
Athens & Nearby Islands / Athens City

Known in antiquity as Brauron, it was dedicated to hunter goddess Artemis and ancient festivals took place there for girls. The sanctuary is still preserved with a colonnade. A small museum features exhibits from the region.

Amarynthos
Evia / Central Evia

Within the last two centuries, prehistoric settlements dating before 3000 BC have been unearthed here, as well as numerous artefacts from a variety of regions and cultures, confirming that Amarynthos was an important trading centre during ancient times. Many of the archaeological discoveries have been found on the hill above the natural harbour as well as throughout the wider area.

Eretria
Evia / Central Evia

The small, unassuming seaside town of Eretria along the coast of the Evian Gulf is the home of one of the most significant and expansive archaeological sites throughout Greece today. Though it played an important role throughout the much of the country’s ancient history, Eretria is best known for its traces of life dating back to the Neolithic period.Stone artefacts and pottery shards dating back to around 3500-3000 BC sparked interest in the site, which also revealed signs of intermittent settlement from 3000 BC until its destruction by the Romans in 87 BC. Today, a theatre, remnants of temples to Ares, Apollo and Dionysus can be seen as well as baths and fragments of walls and gates.

Heroon monument of Toumba
Evia / Central Evia

Within the site of Lefkanti, the Monument of “House of Toumba” is one of the largest structures which date back to the so called “Dark Ages” of Greece. The house itself appears to have been built around 1000 BC and included several graves built in shafts underneath the structure. The tombs contained human and horse skeletons, and the rich artefacts found included the earliest known piece of clothing in the form of an ankle-length robe.

Kalogerovrysi
Evia / Central Evia

Prehistoric settlements and artefacts including a trove of pottery, weapons and tools have been found at this location about 15 klm East of Evia’s capital city, Halkida. Researchers date the site to have been inhabited from the early 3rd millennium BC and supported sporadic periods of habitation including an important Mycenaean colony where tombs containing skeletons were unearthed.

Kastri Potamias
Evia / Central Evia

Ruins found on the hill of Kastri within the Potamias region reveal that the area was inhabited sporadically from the Neolithic era until the 6th century AD. Artefacts found at the site range from clay figurines to millstones and suggest that the area may have included a number of artisan workshops. Experts believe that it was later used as a lookout during the Byzantine period.

Lefkanti
Evia / Central Evia

The archaeological site of Lefkanti at Xeropoli located between Halkida and Eretria has helped shed light on life during the so called “dark ages” of Greece. Excavations confirm that the site was an important Bronze Age settlement dating back to 2100 BC and continued to support a permanent population until as late as 825 BC. A number of tombs and artefacts dating towards the end of this period have proved invaluable in helping archaeologists learn more about this misunderstood period within Greek history.

Mycenaean tomb of Katakalos
Evia / Central Evia

Within the small village of Katakalos just outside the town of Aliveri, stands the best-preserved Mycenaean tomb throughout all of Evia.

Roman Baths of Aliveri
Evia / Central Evia

Recently discovered in 1995, these Roman Baths lie just outside the town of Aliveri near the thermal power station at Karavos. The construction of the power plant is what revealed the site, which dates back to the 4th century AD and appeared to be used until sometime during the 7th century AD. The site contained the several different bathing areas, featuring cold, warm and hot baths as well as changing rooms and places where patrons could store their belongings. Though the site is well-preserved, some of it was unfortunately destroyed during the building of the power station.

Sanctuary of Artemis at Aulis
Evia / Central Evia

Aulis or “Avlida” as it’s known in Greek was where one of the most dramatic scenes throughout Homer’s Iliad took place. After killing a sacred deer of the Goddess Artemis, the leader of the Greek forces Agamemnon could not set sail for Troy due to a lack of wind.

Varka Psachnon
Evia / Central Evia

In the area of Messapia, traces of Neolithic settlements have been found, which contained a significant amount of pottery and other wares. Within the site there are also ruins dating back to the Mycenaean era.

Viglatouri Kymi
Evia / Central Evia

Throughout the last century, fascinating finds just outside the modern seaside town of Kymi have revealed sites of settlement dating back to 1900 BC. On the hill of Oksylithou, remnants of an entire town including buildings, roads, temples and squares have been unearthed. The variety of artefacts found within the area shows that the site must have served as an important trading centre for centuries.

Ancient Site of Palaiopolis
Ionian Islands / Corfu (Kerkyra)

Located approximately 2 km south of Corfu Town within the Mon Repos estate in the Kanoni area,Palaiopolis is the site of the ancient city of Corfu and includes the Ancient Agora (only a few sections are visible),the 6thC BC Doric Kardakio Temple dedicated to Poseidon or Askleipion,and Roman Baths built in the 1stC AD.

Corfu Archaeological Museum
North Aegean / Corfu (Kerkyra)

The museum’s exhibitions span the island’s archaeological history and feature the oldest surviving Greek pediment from the Temple of Artemis Gorgon, the exquisite Lion of Menecrates, and the busts of the historian Thucydides and the dramatist Menander. Other interesting artifacts include household tools and medical apparatus.

Monument of Menecrates
Ionian Islands / Corfu (Kerkyra)

This 6thC BC grave monument features one of the oldest surviving Ancient Greek inscriptions. The 10-verse text dedicates the monument to Menecrates, a Corfiot statesman, in honour of his contribution to Corfu town. It is located in Garitsa.

Palaiopolis Museum (Mon Repos mansion)
Ionian Islands / Corfu (Kerkyra)

Visitors will find exhibits and artifacts found in Palaiopolis, including household, commercial and religious objects that reveal interesting aspects of the private and public lives led by the ancient Corfiots. Only 3 km from Corfu Town, the museum is easily accessible.

Archaeological museum of Dilos
Cyclades / Dilos

The archaeological museum of Delos, was built in 1904 is considered one of the most important museums in Greece. It includes nine rooms with sculptures, bas-reliefs,  mosaics, vessels, jewels, objects of daily use, etc. Noteworthy are the statue of Apollo, the trunk of a Kouros from the temple of Apollo, the marble cluster of Voreas, the statues of Dioskouridis and his spouse Cleopatra, as well as the copper mask of Dionysus.

Avenue of lions
Cyclades / Dilos

West of the lake and next to the Litoo lies the most photographed and worldwide known as the symbol of the island, the Avenue of the Lions. The five marble Lions standing proud were originally 16. They were sculpted during the 7th century B.C. using Naxos marble, representing symbolic guardians of the Holy Lake. During the 17th century, the Venetians seized one, still found in the port of Venice.

Ermaiston or Kompetaliaston Market
Dodecanese / Dilos

This is an open square next to the Holy Harbour. It is one of the most important markets of a Hellenistic city, set with large granite plates, many with holes for the fixing of supports of shelters.  The Gallery of Philippos and a small Ionic temple dedicated to Hermes are on the northern side, while arrays of shops and workshops lie on the eastern and southern side. At the centre lie the foundations of a square and a circular monument dedicated also to Hermes, the god of trade, surrounded by bases of votives depicting bankers, sea captains and tradesmen. Last quarter of the 2nd century B.C.

Institution of Byrition Poseidoniaston
Cyclades / Dilos

The institution of Birytion was the club of a Union of ship owners, bankers and agents that had come together in order to worship their own gods. Also, came together to protect their common commercial interests more effectively. It is constituted by a central courtyard with surrounding columns. Various rooms and small temples dedicated to Poseidon, Hercules and Rome where built around it. Last quarter the 2nd century B.C.

Minoa Krini
Cyclades / Dilos

Minoa Krini (spring), is reported in various scriptures and was identified by an embossed dedicated to the Minoes Nymphs. It is a public reservoir dug in the natural rock on the second half of the 6th century B.C. The spring was in use up to Hellenistic years, when it was changed into a residence.

Residence of Dionysus
Cyclades / Dilos

The residence of Dionysus is a very good example of private residence in Delos from the last quarter of the 2nd century B.C. There is evidence of an underground reservoir for rainwater with an impressive mosaic floor. A stone staircase leads to the elegant private rooms of the first floor.

Stivadeion
Cyclades / Dilos

This is a rectangle platform on the northeast of the temple in which a statue of Dionysus is accompanied by the statues of two actors. The two bases on the left and right sides of the platform supported oversized phalluses. The base found on the southern side, was a votive from the resident of Delos (Karystios), won in a theatrical competition around 300 B.C. It has embossed scenes from the circle of Dionysus.

Temple of Hera
Cyclades / Dilos

The Dorian temple of Hera was built around 500 B.C, although below it there are remnants of an even more ancient temple from the 7th century B.C. Many vessels from the archaic years (now in the Museum) were found under the base. The south side features the altar of the goddess.

Temple of Isis
Cyclades / Dilos

The small Dorian temple of Isis is found in Temple of Foreign Gods at the foot of Kynthos hill. It was built in the 2nd century B.C. and repaired by the Athenians in 135 B.C. The statue of the goddess, still in the temple, was worshipped under various names, protecting seafarers as well as bearing good health and luck.

Temple of the Delians
Cyclades / Dilos

The temple of the Delians or the Great Temple is the largest of the three temples of Apollo. It is a Dorian temple with six by thirteen columns, built in the around the 5th century BC but never reached completion for various reasons.

The Theatre
Cyclades / Dilos

The initially wooden theatre was replaced with the current stone made in the beginning of the 3rd century B.C. The lower part of the theatre is separated by a frieze. Behind the first line of seats, which was for the honoured spectators, there are 26 lines of seats on the lower department and another 17 lines on the upper, which are separated by eight staircases in seven departments. It could seat roughly 5.500 spectators. In front of the circular orchestra lie the foundations of the stage.

Altar remains, Marmara
Central Greece / Evrytania

South of Mount Parnassos, at an altitude of about 1500 meters and overlooking the Oracle of Delphi, there are remains of a shrine or altar lying on the hill of Marmara. It dates back to the 4th century BC most probably.

Aroniada
Central Greece / Evrytania

Ancient graves that haven’t been excavated to the full and remains of a fortress can be found at Aroniada

Kalesmeno
Central Greece / Evrytania

Among the olive trees, mulberry and chestnut trees at an altitude of 1300 meters, there is an archaeological site.

Kastri at Fidakia
Central Greece / Evrytania

This is one of the prettiest villages in Evrytania. Not far off is Kastri, where there are remains of an ancient settlement (possibly Oihala or Oichala) and fortifications.

Ancient Kirra in Itea
Central Greece / Fokida

Near Itea on the seaside, there used to be an ancient settlement called Kirra, dating back to at least 3,000 BC. Although no one knows its exact origins, it is believed that merchants from Crete established the city. Kirra flourished after 1100 BC as a port city which was the gateway to Delphi. It was surrounded by walls and dotted with temples dedicated to Leto, Apollo and Artemis, including grand statues. The city’s heydays probably ended in AD 740 with a massive earthquake that hit the area. Today, only parts of a medieval tower remain.

Ancient Krisa in Chrisso
Central Greece / Fokida

Chrisso, so called because an ancient town called Krisa stood once in its place back in the 14th or 15th centuries BC, displays remains of walls near Stefani hill at the southern side of the Chrisso. Also the hippodrome of Delphi for the Pythian games was in Chrisso long ago, but not much remains of it.

Ancient Lilea or Lilaia
Central Greece / Fokida

The modern village of Lilaia near Polidrossos is built on the ancient city by the same name, inhabited from the early Helladic period (2800-2100 BC). The fortification walls at the citadel summit indicate traces of a constructional phase before the city was destroyed by Phillip II. Another part of the fortress dates back to the rebuilding phase after the reign of Phillip II. In 200 BC the city was under siege by King Phillip V but it revolted and gained its liberty. The city was also mentioned often in the accounts of Strabo, Ptolemy, Pliny and Pausanias, who noted an agora, theatre, baths, sanctuary to Apollo and one to Artemis. Both temples featured marble statues of the gods in standing posture, made by Athenian sculptors. Lilaia was constantly inhabited until the Byzantine era but soon thereafter fell into decay and was abandoned. Today, walls from antiquity and remains of a castle that are still visible.

Ancient Tritea
Central Greece / Fokida

Lying to the northwest of the bay of Itea at a height of 380 meters, the ancient settlement of Tritea was home to the Ozolians and the Lokrians as recently as 30 BC. At that time it fell under the dominion of the Roman Governor of Achaia. Some ruins remain near the new village of Kolopetinitsa.

Archaeological Collection and Naval Museum of Galaxidi
Central Greece / Fokida

Two museums in one building, the Archaeological Collection of Galaxidi reflects life in antiquity including commerce, burial and more, with findings dating grom the Bronze age to the late antique period. In the same traditional building lies the Naval and Ethnological Museum which reflects the strong ties that this once flourishing maritime town has to the sea. Sea maps, model ships and paintings are on display here, as well as weapons from the war of independence.

Castle of Kastriotissa
Central Greece / Fokida

In Kastriotissa, very much inland behind the Mornos lake and the highest village in the region at 1,260 meters, there are ruins of an ancient castle which lie at the southwest end of the village, as well as large blocks of stone from the era of the Ophioneis Aetolians. The town is named after the castle.

Delphi and the Oracle
Central Greece / Fokida

Arguably one of the most important spiritual focal points in antiquity worldwide, Delphi and its famed oracle are visited by thousands of tourists every month and it is well worth it. In summer it is best visited in the afternoon when there are less people and organized tours.

Echedameia and Medeon in Desfina
Central Greece / Fokida

The Echedameia and Medeon in Desfina area boasts ruins and circular graves that are present at Echedameia, which were destroyed by Phillip II of Macedonia around 350 BC. Another site in the same municipality called Syro-Kastro features remains of an ancient settlement called Medeon, also destroyed by Phillip II.

Kallipolis and other sites in Lidoriki
Central Greece / Fokida

There’s an archaeological museum tucked away in Lidoriki as well as notable archaeological sites in the area. At an altitude of 400 meters the area near the village of Kallio used to be known as Kallipolis, which was overrun by the Gaules in 278 BC.  The city is now submerged under Lake Mornos which was created artificially, although many byzantine and ancient artefacts/ruins were retrieved, with many ending up in the Archaeological Museum of Lidoriki. At Lefkaditi some 700 meters above sea level, there are archaeological sites including a fortress and a settlement. The same applies for Koniakos at an altitude of 1,000 meters with remains of an ancient and medieval fortress.

Ozolon Lokron
Central Greece / Fokida

This is another ancient site that not much is known about, other than it was built on the outskirts of Efpalio.

Ruins near Malandrino
Central Greece / Fokida

To the North of Malandrino there are remains of a fortress from Hellenistic times. Fortifications of Fyskeis in the area, representing an ancient city and a religious centre for Locris, are still in relatively good condition. Valuable artefacts from this era are in the museum of Delphi.

Walls of Pira
Central Greece / Fokida

In the vicinity of the church of Agios Pneumatos there are remains of Cyclopean walls, mostly under and around the temple.

No Archeology Found In This Destination. Please Check Other Destinations.
Ahinos in the Municipality of Ehinaion
Central Greece / Fthiotida

Ahinos was built where the city of ancient Ehinos (or Echinous) stood. There are remains of an acropolis from the 4th century BC and a tower that is still quite intact, as well as a war memorial or heroes tomb from roman times. Rectangular walls constructed by Theban general Epaminondas to control access to the sea were built on a hilltop north of the village, and were reinforced and expanded throughout history. Additions from the time of Justinian are also visible.

Akrolamia Frankish castle, Lamia
Central Greece / Fthiotida

The Frankish castle in Lamia (Akrolamia) dominates the city among stones from an ancient acropolis. Many parts are intact including bastions and walls. Successive repairs took place in Byzantine and medieval times, and the site was inhabited even during the 5th century BC. There’s an archaeological museum in the castle.

Ales, Municipality of Malesina
Central Greece / Fthiotida

The ancient settlement of Ales contains ruins from the Neolithic era, as well as ruins from the 6th century BC up to the Hellenistic and Byzantine eras. There are remains of an ancient sanctuary and ancient port.

Ancient Elateia
Central Greece / Fthiotida

In the municipality by the same name, Elateia or Elatia boasts remains of an agora and a temple dedicated to Asclepius with a beardless statue made to his liking. A theatre and statue dedicated to Athena are also found on the site.

Ancient Korsia and Voumelitea, Malesina
Central Greece / Fthiotida

An ancient settlement in the area of Hiliadou is suspected, with remains pointing either to the ancient city of Korsia or to Voumelitea. There is written evidence that Voumelitea is supposed to be right next to Ales.

Ancient Lamia
Central Greece / Fthiotida

The city of Lamia was built over ancient remains from the 4th century BC, and sections of the old walls surrounding the city have been uncovered. The walls began at the hill of Akrolamia or the castle hill, ending at the hill of Agios Loukas. There are remains of the ancient city all over, including under the National Bank of Greece which are still visible in some of the underground parts of the buildings.

Ancient Melitea & Erineo
Central Greece / Fthiotida

Near the modern town of Melitea which lies in the municipality of Domokos there are remains of ancient Melitea, as well as the archaeological site of Erineo in Petroto. Stelae and inscriptions from the area are displayed in the Archaeological Museum of Lamia.

Ancient Phthiotis in Stylida
Central Greece / Fthiotida

Remains from Achaean times of the ancient town of Phthiotis can be seen at Stylida, with the town hall hosting many finds from that era.

Antrona and others, Municipality of Pelasgia
Central Greece / Fthiotida

Known as Larisa Kremaste or Larissa Pelasgia in old times, Pelasgia today shows evidence of the old settlement’s towns and surrounding walls from the 4th or 5th century BC. The archaeological site of Koumouli shows monuments and graves of the early Christian period between 323BC-30AD, plus impressive mosaics by the coast.

Archaeological Museum of Atalanti
Central Greece / Fthiotida

Because this region was inhabited for thousands of years, there are many objects to appreciate at this museum. In addition, there is a mausoleum known as Hamaithanasis worth visiting nearby.

Archaeological Museum of Lamia
Central Greece / Fthiotida

Housed in a historic structure itself from the 1830s and built by King Otto, the Archaeological Museum of Lamia will walk you through ancient history from Neolithic times (starting from 6,500 BC) to Helladic/Mycenaean times, then to Geometric, Archaic and Classical/Hellenistic era. Finds from the later include metal objects, pottery, glass, figurines, children’s toys, jewellery, coins and sculptures. This museum is well worth the visit and is the focal point of the city, along with the castle.

Castle in Neo Monastiri, Municipality of Thessaliotida
Central Greece / Fthiotida

Right where ancient Proena was situated, the castle and temple to Demeter from the 4th century BC or Hellenistic times protected women and children from wars and invasions. The relatively well-preserved castle is called Ginekokastro or ‘Women’s Castle’ and lies on a hilltop. A pavilion displays finds from the area.

Domokos
Central Greece / Fthiotida

Remains of homes from the Neolithic area can be seen on the hills of the area. There are remains of the ancient settlement of Tavmakos, cyclopean walls, a castle and a circular fortress called Stroggilokastro (meaining Round Castle).

Iampolis, Avon and Kirtoni in Atalanti
Central Greece / Fthiotida

There are notable sites of Iampolis and Avon at Exarhos. In Kalopodi there is a temple dedicated to Apollo and Artemis from the Mycenaean era, rebuilt several times in history. In Kirtoni lie the ancient fountain of Kamini and the tower of Kolakas, part of ancient fortifications. There is also an archaeological site with an ancient cemetery in Megaloplatanos.

Kynos and Livanates Tower, Municipality of Dafnousia
Central Greece / Fthiotida

There are two archaeological sites at Livanates, an attractive fishing village, which are Kynos which was the harbor of King Opous of Lokrida (Locris) and Pyrgo Lyvanaton (Tower of Livanates).

Kynos near Livanates
Central Greece / Fthiotida

Once a complete city some two millennia ago, the site of Kinos today offers just a bit of its past glory to the archaeologically curious. It contained the harbour of Opous, named so after an ancient Greek king of Lokrida.

Larimna in the Municipality of Opountia
Central Greece / Fthiotida

Larimna offers an ancient acropolis with remains of old walls and towers. There is also evidence of a breakwater dating back to the 6th century.

Neon and Pediis, Tithorea
Central Greece / Fthiotida

Many archaeological remains in Tithorea are from the ancient towns of Neon where the Phoecians originated and from Pediis. The ancient town of Tithorea was a walled enclave, containing temples of Isis and Arhigeta. Velitsa boasts an ancient castle and walls with floor mosaics from the 4th century AD.

Nisi in Koromilia
Central Greece / Fthiotida

In the archaeological area called Nisi, meaning island in Greek, there are Cyclopean Walls that are still standing.

Paleokastro and Dikastro, Municipality of Agios Georgios
Central Greece / Fthiotida

Remains of walls in Paleokastro. There are even remains of two castles – by some accounts dating from the late Neothlic era – in Dikastro (which means ‘Two Castles’).

Tarfis in Kammena Vourla
Central Greece / Fthiotida

This popular resort town, built where ancient Thronio was located, hides some ruins from the Homeric town of Tarfis as well in a location called Paleokastra.

Temple of Artemis and Apollon at Kalapodi
Central Greece / Fthiotida

The village Kalapodi is home to the ancient temple of Elafivolou and Apollo of Iampolis, which boasts remains of a Dorian structure with columns from the 6th century BC. Some parts of the roof and stone works are now in the archaeological museum of Lamia.

Thermopylae
Central Greece / Fthiotida

There is a restricted archaeological site. In 1939 excavations showed evidence of fortifications spanning several eras, including Roman and Byzantine graves, as well as remains of Byzantine buildings.

Ancient Falassarna
Crete / Hania

Known mostly to travellers as one of the most exquisite beaches on the island, Falassarna like almost every destination in Crete, has an ancient past steeped in historical significance. Once a city itself with a grand trading port one will find evidence of this at its archaeological site which includes remains of the port itself, a cemetery with small, rectangular cist graves, ruins of the city and its walls, as well as an enormous stone throne thought to have been built as a platform for speeches or possibly as an offering to Poseidon, God of the Sea.

Aptera
Crete / Hania

Within 15 or so kilometres east of Hania lie the remains of the hilltop town of Aptera with its breathtaking panoramic views. A very important archaeological site on Crete, Aptera is now run by the Greek Ministry of Culture, Department of Antiquities.

Lissos
Crete / Hania

An ancient city located near the village of Sougia, Lissos boasts remains of an ancient theatre, Roman tombs, and an aqueduct. Possibly the most precious finds are remnants of the ancient mosaic floors belonging to the Temple of Asklepios who was the Greco-Roman God of Healing.

Polyrrinia
Crete / Hania

Yet another ancient city, Polyrhenia prospered during the Roman period on Crete. Founded by the Archaeans, there remain ruins from various Greek and Roman structures as well as highly impressive walls and reinforcement of its acropolis (built during the Byzantine era).

The Tower of Loutro/Finix
Crete / Hania

One lonesome stone tower lies secluded between the small coastal village of Loutro and the Bay of Finix. In the past the ancient town and port of Finikas (or Phoenix) lay just west of the promontory in Loutro.

The Venetian Fort in Rokka
Crete / Hania

Close to the village of Koleni is the small village of Rokka, also known for its somewhat precarious location beside the Rokka Gorge. Overlooking the village are relics of a Venetian fort with remains of various buildings and some cistern graves.

Aghia Triadha
Crete / Herakleion

A splendid site, a couple of kilometres to the west of the “palace” of phaistos, Aghia Triadha is known to have had a history dating back to the middle of the 4th milennium BC.

Amnisos
Crete / Herakleion

One of the two ports of Knossos, Middle Minoan (c1900 BC) artifacts have been found here. Mentioned on Linear B tablets as A-Mi-Ni-So, and connected with the cults of Zeus and Eileithya. The hill above (known as Palaichora) has uncovered the finds of the ‘Villa of the Lillies’. The area was occupied all the way through to later Roman times (2nd C. AD), and again during the Venetian period (1204-1669) before being destoyed during the Ottoman period (1669-1898). An incredibly important Linear B tablet, has offerings of honey to Eileithya at Amnisos, confirming the names of both the port, and the goddess.

Anemospilia, Ano Archanes, Tourkogeitonia
Crete / Herakleion

There are three sites here, all of enormous importance. The so-called “Summer Palace” of Archanes, is visible in parts, though the exceptionally pleasant modern town covers most of it.

Archalochori
Crete / Herakleion

Archalochori lies 4KMs south of the palace of Galatas. A number of bronze artefacts were found here, though many more were lost, as locals finding the site and its booty in the 1950s, understandably melted them down for more pressing needs, such as modern agricultural us.

Galatas
Crete / Herakleion

Galatas is the most recently discovered palace, and lies some 30KMs south of Herakleion, near to the village of the same name and not far from the site of Arkalochori. Originally settled as far back as 3,000 BC, Galatas became a “palace”, with its tell-tell central court, built during the new palatial period. There is no evidence of a first palace period, and the site was already on the wane before the destruction of the other palaces in about 1450BC. Well worth visiting – perhaps in conjunction with Arkalochori – just to get a feel for the place, the site itself is not open to the public at the time of writing.

Gortyna (Gortyns/Gortyn), Agioi Deka
Crete / Herakleion

A splendid multi-period site, many in the past believed to be Knossos, due to its labyrinth of tunnels. Gortyna has always been associated with important discoveries, from an engraved law-code which can still be seen, to the church of Aghios Titos.

Knossos
Crete / Herakleion

Excavated by Sir Arthur Evans, for the British School of Archaeology, throughout the early decades of the 20th century, Knossos is amongst the most important archaeological sites in the world.

Kommos
Crete / Herakleion

On the south coast, Kommos was a port used by Phaistos, Gortyna and Aghia Triadha. Beutifully situated, the excavation is ongoing, and has been expertly supervised by Joseph Shaw, of the American School of Archaeology at Athens. The site itself, is currently inaccessable to visitors to walk upon, but one can get a very clear impression of its magnificence, from several vantage points, and a number of different angles. Its importance as a Minoan port cannot be overstated, but its continuing existance in the post-Minoan period is equally important, and includes the earliest temple in Greece, and a quite possibly Phonecian built shrine, which would be the only one discovered in the Aegean.

Lyttos
Crete / Herakleion

Situated in the province of Kastelli Pediados, northeast of the modern village of Lyttos, this is an extremely important post-Minoan site, known for its associations with Sparta during Classical times.

Malia
Crete / Herakleion

Some 3 Kms east of the resort of the same name, Malia, with an area of 7,500 sq metres, is Crete’s third largest ‘palace’, and great for wandering around. Far less visited than Knossos or Phaistos, one can really get a feel for what it might have been like in Minoan times.

Phaistos
Crete / Herakleion

This is a wonderful spirit-of-place site situated in the Mesara plain and second behind Knossos in importance in Minoan times, mythologically home of Rhadamanthys, Minos of Knossos’ brother (Sarpedon, another brother in Greek myth, was probably a later addition).

Tylissos
Crete / Herakleion

A series of houses built during the 16th C. BC, with further additions and alterations made in the following two centuries, before being destroyed in the 14th century BC, and re-occupied later. House A is both the oldest and largest of the the three main houses, though some of the enlargements took place during the following centuries. Originally excavated by Joseph Chatzidakis in the early years of the 20th century, a further excavation was undertaken in 1954, revealing areas of a paved court, and a stoa with five columns

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Ancient Oinoe, Kambos
North Aegean / Ikaria

The well-known city of Oinoe was once the island’s most important city and has been associated throughout the ages with the worship of Dionysus. Today, the ruins of ancient Oinoe include the area around the mouth of the river Voutside in the northern part of the island near the present-day village of Kambos.

Ancient Therma, Katafygi
North Aegean / Ikaria

At a short distance just east of the present village of Therma, lie the ruins of the ancient city of Thermai, once well-known for its numerous hot springs and baths.

Archaeological Site of Kambos, Kambos
North Aegean / Ikaria

The archaeological site of Kambos consists of the ancient area of Oinoe, which was inhabited from the Mycenaen Age to the Roman and early Byzantine eras. The centre of the site consists of the theatre, Roman aqueducts, and an early Byzantine building, bearing the name “Palaces”. The theatre is an example of impressively-built architecture of late antiquity, featuring stone masonry and large, stone arches.

Megalithic Figures, South East Ikaria
North Aegean / Ikaria

Ikaria’s south east region is dotted with unexplained ancient artefacts which have yet to be studied extensively. They point to the existence of a civilisation which inhabited the island during prehistoric times. It’s worth noting that important artefacts have been found around the acropolis of Drakanou, where ruins of ancient quarries, graves, dockyards and port structures can be seen. Just north of Drakano in the area known as “propezoulori”, there are large, single-stone columns, some still upright and most laying on the the ground. Made from slate or limestone, these columns do not surpass 2.5 metres. It has been suggested that they are the remains of an ancient, sacred area of the island.

Palaiokastro Miliopou
North Aegean / Ikaria

The old castle of Miliopou can be found standing at an altitude of approximately 300 metres on Mt. Gerakas. Today, visitors can view  the ruins of the castle and settlements  that were once there. Another notable site is the Early Christian church of Taxiarchis, also known as the “Evktirio of the Archangel”, which constitutes  some of the oldest remains of a church on the island. It is believed to have been first erected around the end of the fourth century A.D., and today, remains of the sanctuary’s arch, square altar, pillars  and  their respective capitals, can still be seen. A few metres away  lie  the old churches of St. Kyrikos  and Ioulitas.

Tavropolion, Nas
North Aegean / Ikaria

The small coastal village of Nas is located in the island’s north western section, just a few kilometres from Armenistis.Here was where the harbour of the ancient town stood. It’s name is believed to have come either from the word “naos” meaning “temple” or from the word “Ma”, which was how the goddess Artemis was referred to in Asia Minor. The worship of this particular goddess came to the island during the post-Minoan era and prompted the construction of the temple dedicated to the goddess Artemis “Tavropolios”. This unique version of the deity’s name was derived from the word “tavros” meaning bull, as she was known as being a virile force of both nature and destruction.

Acropolis of Ancient Samia (Kato Samiko)
Peloponnese / Ilia

Near the ancient city of Trifilia, founded south of Olympia on the valley of Alfios river, lies the acropolis of Ancient Samia or Samiko in what is known today as Kato Samiko.

Ancient Alifeira
Peloponnese / Ilia

Alifeira is situated on the top of a steep hill over the modern village of Alifeira. This hill is also known as the Nerovitsa Castle. It was occupied by Philip in 229 BC and then became a member of the Achaic commonwealth. Today there is evidence of walls surrounding the citadel, with the foundations of the temple of Athina from the 5th century BC. A sanctuary lies in the northern part of the temple and a 14-step entrance lies in the front part. Another temple on the western side, that of Asklipies, was also discovered, dating from the second half of the 4th century BC. Six tombstones also grace the site, with one having a temple-like facade and a pediment.

Ancient Figaleia
Peloponnese / Ilia

Once a very powerful city, Figaleia was surrounded by a thick wall and with circular and rectangular towers which are still in evidence today and in relatively good condition. Roman travel writer Pausanias mentioned the existence of priests at the Temple of Artemis, writing about Dionysus Evroinomis, a gymnasium and agora, as well as statues of Hermes and of Olympic champion, Arachiona. The latter was found in the ancient agora of the town.

Ancient Ilida
Peloponnese / Ilia

Ilida was the capital of the prefecture Ilia and organized the Olympic Games. There are some excavations and buildings from Greek and Roman times. These include a the theatre, gymnasium, Gallery of Corfu or double arcade and the Meridian Gallery with a triple aisle. Evidence of a square-shaped building with an interior courtyard can also be found.

Ancient Lepreo
Peloponnese / Ilia

Built in a strategic position, Ancient Lepreo was a powerful city that strategically controlled all passages to Ilia, Messinia and Arcadia. This city would have frequent conflicts with the Ilians who were their main rivals.

Ancient Platiana (Tipanai or Aipi)
Peloponnese / Ilia

The ruins of the ancient town (Tipanai or Aipi), occupied the hill of mount Lapitha on the southern part of the village Platiana, near Olympia. It is situated inland, some 17km from the Kiparissian bay.

Ancient Skilloundia (Trifilia)
Peloponnese / Ilia

The city of Trifilia is 3.5 km south of Olympia, where excavations revealed a settlement from the mid-Hellenistic period. The Ilians destroyed the twon in 572 BC and the Spartans dominated it around 400 BC before surrendering it to Xenophon. The latter established the temple of Artemis who protected hunting.

Archaeological Museum of Olympia
Peloponnese / Ilia

Olympia boasts a sophisticated new museum containing some very old pieces indeed. Press the Read More link to discover its riches…

Bassae (Vasses)
Peloponnese / Ilia

Another almost equally important ancient site in Greece is Bassae, where the Temple of Apollo Epicurus (Epikourios) lies. The temple is relatively well preserved but in danger of disintegrating due to the unstable ground underneath, which is why it is kept under a huge tent to protect it while under restoration. It was designed by Iktinos, the same architect who designed the Parthenon, and completed in 420 BC. The temple was dedicated to Apollo after he was considered to have saved the inhabitants of the area from an epidemic. Built at an altitude of 1131 meters, he temple is considered a great example of one that glorified the three styles of architecture during that era (Doric, Ionic, Corinthian).

Byzantine bath of Valanio
Peloponnese / Ilia

There are ruins of a byzantine bath located in Fragoklisia, beside the banks of a small stream. The remains are hauntingly strange, today overgrown with foliage.

Epitalio
Peloponnese / Ilia

Here are some good examples of roman baths with subterranean waterworks and a ceramic furnace. There’s also a large public building (use unkown) as well as foundations of homes dating from the Hellenistic and Roman years. A much older Mycenaean home was also exquivated on the plain of Agoulinitsa, while Mycenaean tombs were discovered at the mouth of the Alfeios river.

Iardanos Tomb
Peloponnese / Ilia

Found in an area called Klidi, the tomb was unearthed in 1954 and it contained 16 graves, with many important artefacts that were moved to the museum in Olympia. The tomb belongs to the legendary hero Iardanos (according to the description by Stravonas). Near the tomb there are the ruins of the altar dedicated to Samios Poseidon.

Kakovatos
Peloponnese / Ilia

The area of Kakovatos is an important Mycenaean site where chamber tombs and fortified settlements were excavated, northeast of today’s village of Kakovatos.

Lasion
Peloponnese / Ilia

This is the most significant city of the mountainous region in Ilia which borders with Arcadia and Achaia. It was located in the Kapelis plateau surrounded by particular plants called foloi. The foloi were named after the Centaur Folos who lived in the forest. Today the plateau is covered with a dense acorn forest and it is considered one the most beautiful in Greece. Traces of walls have been found near the village of Koumani at Kouti (Palaiokastro). The entire area is dotted with ruins and fragments with inscriptions. During Frankish rule it is believed that a tower was built on top of the ancient city.

Mazi
Peloponnese / Ilia

Mazi is located close to the current village Skilloundia, some 6 km from Krestena.

Museum of the History of Excavations, Olympia
Peloponnese / Ilia

Travel through the different excavations to learn how history is unearthed. Get to know the excavation teams throughout the years through photographs, designs, engravings, etc. Excavations, tools and techniques explained!

Mycenaean tombs at Agia Triada
Peloponnese / Ilia

In a mountainous and inaccessible northeast side of Ilia between Panopoulo and Agia Triada lies an elongated graveyard with dozens of Mycenaean tombs.

Olympia
Peloponnese / Ilia

Only 10 kilometres from Pyrgos, Olympia stands as one of the most important sites of Greece, where the first Olympics came into being and thereafter became a legend in this part of the world.

Pyrgos Municipal Market
Peloponnese / Ilia

In the most impressive building in Ilia’s capital, this museum used to be the city’s main market yet now houses different archaeological collections as well as art exhibitions. If you’re passing through Pyrgos, this is a must see!

Theisoa (Lavda), near Andritsena
Peloponnese / Ilia

Located in a mountainous region east of Anditsaina the village of Theisoa was called in ancient times Lavda. Ruins of houses are found in the area, with parts of temples along with some inscriptions. The town’s acropolis is located on the northwest part of today’s community, surrounded by a strong wall. The Dutch Archeological Institute has excavated a part of a cemetery. The tombs portray an idiosyncratic style regarding the alignment of the corpses and funeral gifts.

Ancient Acropolis of Sistrouni
Epirus / Ioannina

Just outside the village of Sistrouni in the southwest area of the region lie the remains of an ancient building which dates back to the fourth century BC. Little remains today, including a few remnants of walls and water tanks.

Ancient Dodona
Epirus / Ioannina

In the shadows of Mt. Tomaros lie the ruins of the oldest oracle in ancient Greece, with researchers placing its origins as far back as the Bronze Age between 2600 and 1900 BC. It was dedicated to an early deity representing the Earth Mother similar to Gaia or Rhea.

Ancient Skamneli
Epirus / Ioannina

Fragments of walls possibly dating back to the 8th century BC have been found outside the village of Skamneli. They are believed to be remnants of a fortification built by the Pelasgian tribe that inhabited these areas during that time.

Gormos River Valley
Epirus / Ioannina

The fertile land of the Gormos River Valley that has been a blessing to farmers and shepherds throughout the Pogoni region has actually benefited man for over two millennia. Archaeologists have found several areas which contain artefacts and remains spanning from as far back as the 11th century BC. Throughout the wider area, remains of settlements as well as tombs have been excavated and the artefacts found there can be seen in Ioannina’s Archaeological museum.

Kastraki
Epirus / Ioannina

On the hill of Kastraki just outside the village of Kleidonias lie ruins of a building dating back to the 3rd century B.C. Today there isn’t much left to see but the view is worth the small hike to the top of the hill.

Prehistoric site of Vitsa-Monodedri
Epirus / Ioannina

Between the villages of Vitsa and Monodendri lie the remains of a settlement belonging to the Mollosian tribe. Remnants of the Mollosians have been found extensively throughout the wider Epirus region and this site is believed to date as far back as the 9th century BC. The site consists of the ruins of residences as well as two graveyards. Weapons, jewellery and pottery were found buried along with the remains of over 150 people. The artefacts are displayed in both the Archaeological Museum of Ioannina and the National Archaeological Museum in Athens.

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Chrysoheria Castle, near Chora, Cave of 7 Virgins
Dodecanese / Kalymnos

Built by the Knights Templar in the 15thC, the remains of this castle will let you peek into Kalymnos’ medieval past. Seek out the coats-of-arms belonging to the Knights Templar, explore the Church of Panagia Chrysoheria – this is where a hoard of gold coins was rumored to be found under its floors.

Church of Christ of Jerusalem, near Chora/Pothia
Dodecanese / Kalymnos

This is part of Sanctuary of Delios Apollo. Here you’ll be able to admire the remains of two early Christian basilicas – the basilica of the Church of Christ of Jerusalem and the Church of Saint Sophia.

Great Castle of the 9 Chapels – Megalo Kastro (Chora)
Dodecanese / Kalymnos

Built in the Middle Byzantium and rebuilt by the Knights Templar, the ruins of this archaeological site offer you a glimpse all the way back to the 4thC BC through to the 15thC AD. Take the time to admire the wood-carved altar in the Church of Panagia Keharitomeni within the castle grounds.

Sanctuary of Dalios Apollo, near Chora/Pothia
Dodecanese / Kalymnos

Dating back to the 10thC BC, this site is the most significant archaeological area in Kalymnos. The remains of the buildings, including political buildings, a theater and statues, echo the religious and political importance of this sanctuary which doubled as the religious and political capital of ancient Kalymnos.

Site of Ancient Damos, near Panormos (north)
Dodecanese / Kalymnos

The center of Kalymnos’ life in the Hellenistic and Roman periods, the remains at Damos boast workshops, homes, baths, tombs and walls. Take your time to admire the statues in the cemetery.

Ancient Athamanon in Argithea
Thessaly & Sporades / Karditsa (Lake Plastira)

The traditional village of Argithea was once where the ancient capital of Athamania was located, some two kilometres west of the village at a site called Ellinika. Excavations have revealed large walls 15 metres in height, ancient residences, preserved remnants of the walls around the city, parts of the statues and their pedestals, an ancient cemetery on the eastern side of the old city, and another to the west (4th to 1st century BC), more than 180 enclosed tombs, and limestone plaques from local stone along with a wealth of funeral gifts. A pillaged memorial tomb plus tombstone stele and artefacts rich with inscriptions have all been unearthed. This is the most important of all archaeological sites of ancient Athamanon. Excavations have revealed large walls 15 metres in height, ancient residences, preserved remnants of the walls around the city, parts of the statues and their pedestals, an ancient cemetery on the eastern side of the old city, and another to the west (4th to 1st century BC), more than 180 enclosed tombs, and limestone plaques from local stone along with a wealth of funeral gifts. A pillaged memorial tomb plus tombstone stele and artefacts rich with inscriptions have all been unearthed. This is the most important of all archaeological sites of ancient Athamanon.

Ancient Athamanon tombs and graves
Thessaly & Sporades / Karditsa (Lake Plastira)

The village of Koumbouriana within Athamanon lies an altitude of 1050 meters. The Kato Choro or ‘lowlands’ of the area have been characterised as an official archaeological district with ruins of many old buildings and numerous ancient tombs and graves.

Ancient Dolopia at Belokomitis
Thessaly & Sporades / Karditsa (Lake Plastira)

At the area called Plagia near Belokomitis, a building site and parts of ancient walls from the time of the ancient Dolopians (6th century BC) were discovered. At the Panigiraki site, a house dating from the 6th century AD was excavated. At Paliospita, there’s a settlement dating between the 8th to 10th centuries AD.

Ancient Dolopia at Karitsa
Thessaly & Sporades / Karditsa (Lake Plastira)

Karitsa of the Dolopons is one of the older villages of Nevropolis and was continually occupied since the Byzantine era. At Paliohori just past the village of Karitsa near the river there are archaeological ruins belonging to the ancient Dolopes. Artefacts reveal that the settlement dates from the 3rd century BC.

Ancient Gomfoi
Thessaly & Sporades / Karditsa (Lake Plastira)

The site of the ancient city of Gomfoi (pronounced Gomfi) is located 2 km northwest of Episkopi within the region of Mouzaki. The ruins of Gomfoi include a fortified wall, part of which was recently excavated.
In 48 B.C., Gomfoi initially took the side of Pompey following the policy of the Commons of Thessaly. The Gomfians refused to open their gates to the army of Caesar, and after a lengthy siege Caesar overtook the city. In the sixth century AD during the reign of Justinian, the fortifications of the city were strengthened and during the Byzantine era it became the seat of a Bishopric.

Ancient Kallithiro at Agios Athanasios
Thessaly & Sporades / Karditsa (Lake Plastira)

Kallithiro in Itamo features an archaeological dig on the hill of Agios Athanasios which revealed artefacts from the ancient city of Kallithiro. The city was supposedly destroyed in a fire in 220 to 230 BC. Three more archaeological sites are within the inhabited part of the village.

Ancient Menelaida, Kastania
Thessaly & Sporades / Karditsa (Lake Plastira)

In Kastania, a resort village at an altitude of 800 metres near fir tree forest, there are remains of an ancient fortress, said to be remains of the ancient city of Menelaida.

Artefacts from Ancient Athamanon at Leontito
Thessaly & Sporades / Karditsa (Lake Plastira)

Two kilometres from Leontito in the Athamanon area excavations have revealed artefacts probably belonging to the ancient Athamanon. There are also remains from the Middle Ages.

Box-shaped graves in Apidia
Thessaly & Sporades / Karditsa (Lake Plastira)

The village of Apidia Village in the Kallifoni area (23 km from Karditsa and 11 km from the village of Kallifoni) lies on of 330 metres. Ancient box-shaped graves have been found in the Apidia district that link it with habitation in antiquity.

Byzantine baths of Loxada
Thessaly & Sporades / Karditsa (Lake Plastira)

In Loxada, there are Byzantine baths, which have yet to be excavated in full.

Cave of Andrea the Thief of Limeri, Moschato
Thessaly & Sporades / Karditsa (Lake Plastira)

Moschato is in the Plastiras municipality and is16 kilometres from Karditsa, located at an altitude of 450 metres. Near the village is the Cave of Andrea the Thief of Limeri. Surely there are legends surrounding this cave.

Dolopian walls at Leontari
Thessaly & Sporades / Karditsa (Lake Plastira)

Leontari (pronounced Leondari) is in the municipality of Tamasi. The name of the village is taken from that of King Leontio, who, according to ancient history, ruled the region and was the brother-in-law to the King of Rendina, Menelaus. Ancient walls of the Dolopons can be found at the border of the village.

Graves at Anavra
Thessaly & Sporades / Karditsa (Lake Plastira)

Anavra is a village within the municipality of Tamassi, and is 28 km from Karditsa. Ancient graves have been found in the area testifying to its long history of continual occupation.

Katafili (Selipiana)
Thessaly & Sporades / Karditsa (Lake Plastira)

The area of Katafili village was called Selipiana, taken from the name of the kingdom of Selipos which existed there in 285 B.C. The area abounds in archaeological ruins and artefacts, including walls which date from the Hellenistic period, coins, residences, graves, and statues.

Menelaida at Loutropigi
Thessaly & Sporades / Karditsa (Lake Plastira)

Loutropigi is located in a gorge a few kilometres above the Baths of Smokovo. The route to the village is historic as it starts from the ancient kingdom of the Dolopians, Menelaida. Segments of an ancient wall (Kastro) are found 4km north of the village at the site of Profitis Elias at an altitude of 995 metres.

Mosaics and temple remains at Pefkofito
Thessaly & Sporades / Karditsa (Lake Plastira)

Pefkofito, meaning Planted Pine is a beautiful village at 730 metres altitude within the Mouzaki region. At the site of Palea Theotokos, archaeological excavations have revealed the foundations of older temples with mosaic floors.

Mosaics in Fanari
Thessaly & Sporades / Karditsa (Lake Plastira)

The Church of Zoodochos Pigi (Source of Life) in Fanari was built atop an ancient Roman bath.

Mycenaean remains at Paleokastro
Thessaly & Sporades / Karditsa (Lake Plastira)

Ano and Kato Ktimeni lie in the municipality of Tamassi. Historically, Ktimeni was the capital of the ancient kingdom of Dolopas. Within the village district at the site of Paleokastro are remains of Mycenaean walls (1300 BC), and at Kastri, Mycenaean tombs have been found.

Mycenaean tomb at Xinoneri
Thessaly & Sporades / Karditsa (Lake Plastira)

Xinoneri is part of the Mitropoli region, lies 8 km from Karditsa. A Mycenaean tomb of almost 14 square km was discovered on a hill between Xinoneri and neighbouring Agios Giorgios. Ongoing archaeological excavations will undoubtedly render this site more important.

Paleokastro at Porti
Thessaly & Sporades / Karditsa (Lake Plastira)

The village of Porti, six kilometres northwest of Mouzaki was referred to by the ancient author Polyvio as the settlement of Akron, featuring an army bastion of the Athamanon king, Aminandro. At the site of Paleokastro, remnants of ancient walls of archaeological interest are still present.

Pelasgians, Alopians and Ethiopes in Petroto
Thessaly & Sporades / Karditsa (Lake Plastira)

Archaeological artefacts demonstrate that the village district has been continuously occupied from the Roman and Byzantine periods to the modern era. Protected archaeological sites are located at the sites of Paleokastro and Gournarakia.

Remains at Neraida
Thessaly & Sporades / Karditsa (Lake Plastira)

The village of Neraida lies 41 km from Karditsa and is part of Itamo municipality. Around the village area, sites with ancient artefacts and graves have been located.

Remains of Orthi near Kedros
Thessaly & Sporades / Karditsa (Lake Plastira)

Kedros is a village rich in history and archaeological tradition. In the woods of Saint Nikolaos, 2 km northwest of the village, the ruins of the ancient city of Orthi were discovered. Old coins, the entrance of a fortified wall to the city, and the ancient cemetery have also been found.

Sarantaporos near Neraida
Thessaly & Sporades / Karditsa (Lake Plastira)

Near the village of Neraida in the municipality of Itamos, the new village of Sanrataporos reveals sites with ancient artefacts and graves that have been found in the vicinity. There are also walls of an ancient city located on the flood plains of the river Megdova.

Settlement evidence and graves at Rentina
Thessaly & Sporades / Karditsa (Lake Plastira)

At an altitude of 900 meters, Rentina (pronounced Redina or Rendina) reveals walls of ancient prehistoric settlements that have been found in the area, as well as graves dating from the 4th and 3rd centuries BC.

Temple of Apollo at Lianokokkalo, Mitropoli
Thessaly & Sporades / Karditsa (Lake Plastira)

Mitropoli, the capital of the municipality by the same name, is about 9 km from Kardista. An ancient temple dedicated to Apollo was recently discovered at the area called Lianokokkalo.

Tower of Ithomi
Thessaly & Sporades / Karditsa (Lake Plastira)

The Fortress of Ithomi, otherwise known as the Pirgos or Tower, is 700 to 800 metres southeast of the village by the same name (Pirgos Ithomis) at an altitude of 364 metres. It was built of massive stone blocks layer by layer. The ruins of the ancient acropolis of the city of Ithomi surround the Tower. It was built by the Pelasgians, peoples who preceded the Greeks. There are still traces of fortifications around the perimeter of the tower, as well as some other structures from that period.

Wall remains at Vimberotripa
Thessaly & Sporades / Karditsa (Lake Plastira)

Portitsa is a village near Metropoli, 12 km from Karditsa. The limestone peak of Vimberotripa at an elevation of 762 metres is a site of well-preserved walls of an ancient acropolis, with full view towards the plains of Thessaly.

Walls near Morfovouni
Thessaly & Sporades / Karditsa (Lake Plastira)

Following the road past Messenikolas one arrives at the picturesque village of Morfovouni (aka Vounessi), 18 kilometres southwest of Karditsa. Two kilometres east of the village at the Paleokastro locality is an archaeological preserve containing the ruins of ancient walls.

Acropolis of Arkesia, Arkasa
Dodecanese / Karpathos

In 1923 excavations in the area of Arkasa discovered the remains of and acropolis at the Church of Agia Sofia (previously Agia Anastasia). Mosaics, a graveyard and some inscriptions from the later period remain, so do ancient columns.

Ancient Basilica and Kiln in Lefkos
Dodecanese / Karpathos

Remains of an early Christian church emerged during excavations at Lefkos some 50 years ago, complete with mosaics and parts of a large apse, indicating a flourishing civilization between the 1st and 7th centuries AD.

Ancient Potidaion or Posidaion, Pigadia
Dodecanese / Karpathos

This ancient city where the capital of Karpathos lies today thrived in Roman and early Christian times. However, it was inhabited as far back as the Neolithic and early bronze period, revealing a wide variety of remains and surprising finds.

Aperi
Dodecanese / Karpathos

In the greater region of the village of Aperi there are remains of what today is known as the Castle of Aperi and of an ancient acropolis. The Tomb of Diogenis in Lori can also be found here.

Byzantine remains in Diafani
Dodecanese / Karpathos

Above the picturesque village of Diafani with the island’s second port, there are remains of a Byzantine bath in an area known as Kampi. On higher ground there are remains of a Paleo-Christian basilica.

Palaiokastro, Vroukounta
Dodecanese / Karpathos

Vroukounta was one of the island’s four ancient Doric cities. Only remains of the ancient walls are left as well as burial chambers carved into the rocks. You’ll also find parts of three Paleo-Christian basilicas and some graves. Marvel at the cyclopean walls from the Mycenaean era, and see how these were reused to build more recent structures.

Saria
Dodecanese / Karpathos

This uninhabited island north of Karpathos is full of ruins from ancient times. It was also a Saracen/Arab base for Pirates dating from the 7th to 10th centuries, with remains of buildings from that era.

No Archeology Found In This Destination. Please Check Other Destinations.
Ancient Town of Sami (near Sami village)
Ionian Islands / Kefalonia

Take some time to explore the remains of what used to be an acropolis near Sami village – this Ancient Greek acropolis was also mentioned in Homer’s texts. Walls date back to the Hellenistic period, while there are also remains of a Roman theater and Roman baths nearby. Look for the mosaics as you explore.

Beehive/Tholos Tomb (near Tzanata village, close to Poros village)
Ionian Islands / Kefalonia

One of the most recent discoveries, this tomb housed Mycenaen kings in their afterlife and dates back to 1300 BC. One of the biggest beehive-type tombs reserved for Ancient Greek royalty in the region, it measures almost 7 meters in diameter, and is thought to be the grave of Odysseus himself. Gold jewelry which resembles Odysseus’ gold brooch as described in Homer’s poem was also found here.

Municipal Archaeological Museum of Argostoli (Argostoli town)
Ionian Islands / Kefalonia

This museum is a must-see for everyone. It holds some of the most significant Mycenaean artifacts ever to be found in Greece – the result of excavations that discovered the Beehive/Tholos Tomb and the Roman Grave Complex. Jewelry, pottery and other tools are featured, as are artifacts found in a cave.

Roman Grave Complex (near Fiskardo village)
Ionian Islands / Kefalonia

Dating back to the 2ndC BC up to the 4thC AD, this compound of graves suggests Kefalonia was of vital strategic significance during the Roman era. The most important findings out of the five burial sites that make up the grave complex include a stone sarcophagus and a vaulted tomb, along with gold jewelry. Explore the Roman theater found near the burial complex.

Roman Villa (Scala village)
Ionian Islands / Kefalonia

Make it a point to explore parts of this semi-preserved Roman villa which dates back to the 2ndC AD. Although some sections are in ruins, you’ll be able to admire the stunning mosaics and the baths adjoining the villa. Look for interesting inscriptions as you stroll through this site.

No Archeology Found In This Destination. Please Check Other Destinations.
Acrocorinth
Peloponnese / Korinthia

Ancient Corinth also boasts archaeological ruins – mostly Roman and some Greek – at the foot of the huge rock, Acrocorinth. Walls, mosaics, reliefs and works of different civilizations are all present.

Archaeological Museum of Corinth
Peloponnese / Korinthia

Wander through Roman exhibits in 3 special showrooms and around the museum’s courtyard. The museum highlights the long history of Corinth starting from the Neolithic era until the Middle Ages.

Archaeological Museum of Isthmia
Peloponnese / Korinthia

Right beside the site where many archaeological treasures were unearthed, this museum features all the finds and outstanding glass tableaus from 375 AD.

Archaeological Museum of Nemea
Peloponnese / Korinthia

Right on site, the museum focuses on finds of the area and sheds light on its history, complementing the site where sadly not much remains.

Nemea and Aidonia
Peloponnese / Korinthia

The region of Nemea, known more for its wine, also contains some ruins, a small sample of what remains of Ancient Nemea. A few columns from the temple of Zeus and some foundations, as well as parts of a palaestra and a stadium for the Pan-Hellenic games can be found. Aidonia near Nemea has remains of a Mycenean cemetery, while 4 kilometers from the village of Derveni there are remains of an ancient theatre.

Sanctuary of Poseidon, Isthmia
Peloponnese / Korinthia

One of the most important Pan-Hellenic shrines in the country is the sanctuary of Poseidon at Isthmia (7th century BC) not far from the village of Kiravrisi where the Pan-Hellenic games took place every other year. There is also a museum that has many interesting objects, particularly the paintings on glass.

Sikiona (Sicyon), near Kiato
Peloponnese / Korinthia

Not far from the coastal town of Kiato are the Hellenistic ruins of Sicyon or Sikiona. The ruins of the agora and a temple remain today, as well as the bouleuterion, stadium and theatre. The Roman baths have been restored and transformed into a museum.

Ancient Agora of Kos (Kos Town)
Dodecanese / Kos

Dating back to the 4thC BC, the ancient Agora in Kos constituted the political, commercial, religious and social hub of the island and was one of the most important Agoras in the world. Walk through the arcades, admire the temples and columns, meander through the sanctuaries and you’ll get a glimpse of the bustling center that once defined this island.

Ancient House – The Garden of Hippocrates
Dodecanese / Kos

Take a tour of the exact replica of a 5thC BC Ancient Kos home. Admire the kitchen with all the utensils and the unique chimney. You’ll find statues and votive offerings to the gods as well. Explore the philosophical lodge outside, and add to the botanical garden by planting herbs used by Hippocrates himself. Craft lessons are also offered for mosaic-making.

Asklipios Sanctuary (outside Kos town)
Dodecanese / Kos

One of the most important archaeological sites in the world, this sanctuary dates to the 4thC BC and is found at the top of a lush hill surrounded by pine forests. It was the most important healing center in Ancient Greece and is extremely well-preserved. Built on three levels, you’ll explore the altar, temples and baths as well as where the priests and patients lived.

Paleo-Christian Basilica of St. Steven (Kefalos village)
Dodecanese / Kos

Dating back to the 5thC AD, this is an architectural jewel. Built as a double basilica, its remains are well-preserved. Here you’ll see a stunning floor mosaic, interesting masonry, and beautiful sculptures.

Roman Odeon (Gregory the 5th St. Kos Town)
Dodecanese / Kos

This theater dating back to the 2ndC AD served as both a venue for musical festivals as well as a house for the Roman Senate. It’s one of the best-preserved odeons, and here you’ll find marble and granite seats as well as the original stage floor.

Housti cave dig (near Diakofti)
Ionian Islands / Kythera

Stone tools and artifacts dating back to 4000 BC and belonging to the Classical and Roman times mark this as an important site. Excavations are ongoing throughout the summer and visitors can request a guided tour from the on-site working archeologists and even volunteer.

Paleohora (near Kastri)
Ionian Islands / Kythera

For a glimpse into the island’s Byzantine past, visit this veritable Byzantine ghost town razed in 1536 by Ottoman warrior Barbarossa. Located close to Kakia Lagada canyon, you’ll find the remains of 12thC monasteries, over 20 Byzantine churches and almost 80 homes that made up this former capital.

Paleokastro (near Paleohora)
Ionian Islands / Kythera

Highlights of this site – the island’s capital city in Antiquity – include a sanctuary dedicated to Aphrodite, the remains of walls and buildings.

Paleopoli
Ionian Islands / Kythera

Minoan graves and the remains of an ancient castle are visible at this site. Inquire at the museum for more information.

Kastro Orias
Cyclades / Kythnos

High on a rock above the sea on the northwest end of Kythnos is Kastro Orias, the capital of the island during Byzantine and Venetian rule. Said to be impregnable the town is in ruins now but the ancient walls and streets are still in evidence and there are two of the 100 churches that used to stand here, that have been restored. You can reach Kastro Orias, also known as Kefalikastro, by car or on foot.

Vryokastro
Cyclades / Kythnos

Besides Kastro, the most important archaeological sites of Kythnos include Vryokastro, the ancient 10th century B.C. capital on the norteastern coast. There are the remains of some walls and towers and two Hellenistic temples. Little remains of the ancient site of Kastellas but the site of Maroulas, perhaps the oldest site in the Cyclades, has the remains of some buildings from the 8th and 7th Century B.C.

Acropolis of Sparta
Peloponnese / Laconia

There are only a few remains of the Acropolis of Sparta, with evidence of a Roman agora, a theatre, a cyclical building and a theatre. The Church of Christ from the 1st century AD is also there.

Amyklaion and Sanctuary of Apollo Amyklaios
Peloponnese / Laconia

This site flourished as far back as the prehistoric era and well into the Roman period. Spartan festivals were held there. The sanctuary was excavated in 1890, while barts of the Throne of Bathykles were retrieved from there as well.

Geraki
Peloponnese / Laconia

In 1905, archaeologists found artefacts here from the Neolithic period. Researchers from the University of Amsterdam in 1997 found clay seals and coins from the Early Helladic era. There is also evidence of a Mycenaean city about 1800 BC until when the Dorians arrived. Geraki (or Ancient Geronthres) has an acropolis that is guarded with a wall, even if there are archaeological finds dating from Neolithic times, i.e. from around 6000 B.C. In Christian times the area was built up with Byzantine churches decorated with frescoes and bas relief, as well as a Frankish castle built on a hill overlooking all of the plateau of Geraki.

Menelaion at Sparta
Peloponnese / Laconia

There is a shrine dedicated to Menelaos (or Menelaus) and Helen, along with evidence of a 5th century BC temple with votive offerings to Helen (now on display at the Archaeological Museum of Sparta).

Mystras
Peloponnese / Laconia

Albeit a Byzantine site rather than an ancient Greek site, Mystras is truly magical and a Unesco World Heritage site worthy of a visit. Mystras reveals the full legacy of the Christian Byzantine empire. The whole town is a Byzantine museum in itself with remains of churches and monasteries that are hundreds of years old…

Paliokastro
Peloponnese / Laconia

In Monemvasia near Agios Ioannis there is the acropolis of Epidaurus Limeras, now known as Paliokastro or Kastraki.

Pellana
Peloponnese / Laconia

Sparta might be better known, but Pellana was just as developed in ancient times, with spectacular royal Mycenaean towns and an acropolis to show for it. There is also the Sanctum of Asclepius just a few meters away from the Pellanida spring.

Roman Theatre and Laryssion at Gytheion
Peloponnese / Laconia

A well preserved Roman theatre can be found here, as well as remains of an ancient settlement called Laryssion on Mount Koumaros. The town exported the murex shell for dyeing Imperial roman togas in the colour purple.

Sanctuary of Artemis Orthia Sparta
Peloponnese / Laconia

Bulit around 1100 B.C. but destroyed in the 6th century BC probably because of flooding. Rebuilt in the 2nd and 3rd centuries AD. The Spartans performed dances here with masks, as the place was used to educate young Spartans.

Sykia and other sites at Molaon
Peloponnese / Laconia

In the Municipality of Molaon archaeological excavations have revealed remains from the Mycenaean era at Sykia, as well as Byzantine mosaics in the area of Chalasmata area and Aghios Nikolas at Pakia.

Tholos Tombs at Vapheio
Peloponnese / Laconia

Amazing and distinct in their architecture with beehive domes, these tombs are very representative of early Mycenaean settlements.

Acropolis of Farsala & other ruins
Thessaly & Sporades / Lake Karla & Mavrovouni

The Acropolis of Farsala lies atop a rocky hill of the Prophet Elias, stretching from east to west. It is 500 meters long and 60 meters wide, surrounding by natural fortifications. Worth a visit when passing near Farsala.

Acropolis of Pyrasos
Thessaly & Sporades / Lake Karla & Mavrovouni

The 29 metre high low hill of Magoula that stands on a low (29 meter) hill above the town was once the acropolis of Pyrasos. Pyrasos is scarcely known from historical sources, except that it was an active harbour and featured a famous temple of Demeter and Kore, after which the harbour was later known as Demetrion.

Acropolis of the ancient Feres
Thessaly & Sporades / Lake Karla & Mavrovouni

One of Thessaly’s most notable sites, the Acropolis of ancient Feres was inhabited between the neolithic period (around 300 B.C.) and the era of the early Roman Empire (first century A.D.), and again in the Byzantine period during the 13th Century. It was given its name in modern history for being the home of local author, politician and revolutionary Rigas Feraios, who was one of the heroes of the 1821 Greek Revolution. The site has undergone few renovations until the present day although its most vulnerable parts are being maintained.

Ancient Eretria, Farsala, Larisa region
Thessaly & Sporades / Lake Karla & Mavrovouni

Ancient Eretria was founded on a hill some 650 meters high in the middle of the great Thessalian plain, not far from today’s village of Palaiomylos. You’ll find few remains of an acropolis, walls and gates on the site. Source: Farsala.gr

Ancient Kasthanea, Keramidi
Thessaly & Sporades / Lake Karla & Mavrovouni

The remains of Ancient Kasthanea (or Kasthanaia) near Keramidi have revealed remains of a city who according to Herodotus was involved in defeating the Persian King Xerxes in 480 BC. Only parts of the walls of this city still remain today.

Ancient market arcade theatre
Thessaly & Sporades / Lake Karla & Mavrovouni

Northeast of the low hill of Kastraki you will find the base of an ancient theatre, and a flat area where one can assume the theatre orchestra once stood.

Ancient Skotousa, near Farsala, Larisa region
Thessaly & Sporades / Lake Karla & Mavrovouni

Skotousa stood over hills on the road between the villages of Ano Skotousa and Agia Triada. While not totally unearthed, current remains point out to long walls over 4 km with 44 square towers, 5 gates, a stadium and a theatre. Source:Farsala.gr

Ancient spring of Hypereia Krini
Thessaly & Sporades / Lake Karla & Mavrovouni

Mythology has it that the Goddess Hera bathed in the crystal, healing waters of this former spring in order to renew her virginity. The spring, located in the center of the ancient city, flowed abundantly since ancient times – ever since it was inhabited in 3000 B.C. – until 1998, when it suddenly dried out.

Archaeological finds (Kileler, Larissa)
Thessaly & Sporades / Lake Karla & Mavrovouni

Neolithic settlements and a broad variety of finds from the prehistoric and historic years were discovered in the area surrounding the village. Remnants from a mosque were found at the Tzami height, where a Myceanean tomb with significant finds was also unearthed.

Archaeological site of Dimini
Thessaly & Sporades / Lake Karla & Mavrovouni

Just 5 km west of Volos and close to the village of Dimini lies a grand Neolithic settlement with a high level of urban sophistication dating from the 5th century BC.

Archaeological site of Sesklo
Thessaly & Sporades / Lake Karla & Mavrovouni

Around 15 km from Volos and set atop Kastraki hill you can find the well known Sesklo archaeological site. The Neolithic settlement of Sesklo was inhabited from the mid-7th till the 4th millenium B.C.