Landmarks in Athens & Attica


This Hydriot captain played a crucial role in getting Hydra to join the liberation efforts of the Greek Revolutionary War of 1821, despite the resistance of several of the island’s nobles.
Photos: (0)                     Phone: N/A             Email: N/A
National hero and Hydriot shipowner and builder, Andreas Miaoulis played a leading role in the revolution of 1821 as the Head Naval Commander of the Greek fleet.
Photos: (0)                     Phone: N/A             Email: N/A
This bust honors the Hydriot captain Nikolaou G. Kolmaniati (Nicolas Jorge Colmaniatis). After immigrating to Argentina in 1811, he enrolled into the navy as a sailor and eventually reached the rank of rear admiral. Today he is honored as a national hero in Argentina.
Photos: (0)                     Phone: N/A             Email: N/A
First president of the burgeoning Greek state Ioannis Kapodistriou built this orphanage in the southeast section of the city.
Photos: (0)                     Phone: N/A             Email: N/A
This rose-colored Venetian tower may be ruined but that only adds charm to the modern state's first headquarters from 1816-1828. The structure is next to a peaceful square a few streets inland from the harbor and is named after the man who built it.
Photos: (0)                     Phone: N/A             Email: N/A
Beth Shalom is the city's main synagogue built in 1930's by the Sephardic community of Athens. It is a neoclassical marble structure with stained glass windows. Like in all Greek synagogues, women sit upstairs on the balcony.
Photos: (0)                     Phone: N/A             Email: N/A
On the Alimos coastal road, i.e. Poseidonos Avenue, the 2,028 Commonwealth servicemen during the WWII who perished in the area are buried or commemorated here. Some fell in the Crimean War, others in Crete or Yugoslavia, etc. Very peaceful, thought-provoking and green.
Photos: (0)                     Phone: N/A             Email: N/A
Great 19th century funerary art. Look for the tombs of Koimomeni (sleeping beauty), hero Theodoros Kolokotronis, hero Yiannis Makriyiannis, writer Panayiotis Soutsos, statesman Harilaos Trikoupis, museum founder Antonios Benakis, architect Heinrich Schliemann, Scottish philhellene George Finlay, etc.
Photos: (0)                     Phone: N/A             Email: N/A
Only the gate and some remains are left of this institution in Plaka. It was built in 1721 by a pious Turk called Mehmet Fahri the Honorable. Before Greek independence it became a prison and Greek inmates were hanged from the plane tree in the courtyard. Tree and building were later destroyed.
Photos: (0)                     Phone: N/A             Email: N/A
This lighthouse which was built in 1883 can be found on the eastern side of Hydra. It stands at 10 m. tall and was rebuilt in 1946, after having been destroyed during the course of the Second World War.
Photos: (0)                     Phone: N/A             Email: N/A
Also known as Fetihyie Tzami, was built in the 15th century by the Ottomans over the remains of a Byzantine church. The Venetian General Morosini transformed it into a Catholic Church later. In the 19th century it served as a school, then as a military building, and eventually a bakery.
Photos: (0)                     Phone: N/A             Email: N/A
In Greek it is known as the Kentriki Agora or Demotiki Agora. Along with the adjacent meat, fish and vegetable markets, this place is full of the traditional sights and sounds of Athens. The small wine eateries called Oinomagereia are also a special phenomenon (closed Sundays).
Photos: (0)                     Phone: N/A             Email: N/A
On the Hill of the Nymphs in the attractive Thisseo neighborhood, this attractive observatory was unique in the Balkans. Like other notable buildings in Athens, it was designed by Theophile Hansen and completed in 1842. Its unique cross-shape reflects the 4 points of the horizon.
Photos: (0)                     Phone: N/A             Email: N/A
King Otto of Greece lived here while the Royal Palace (today's Parliament) was being built. The neoclassical building, now the History Museum, was used as the House of Parliament in from 1843-1854 and 1875-1932. Noteworthy too is the statue of General Kolokotronis on a horse up front.
Photos: (0)                     Phone: N/A             Email: N/A
Founded in the late 1820s and designed by Hans Christian Hansen, the university is a true architectural landmark in Athens. The portico boasts frescoes done by Bavarian Karl Rahl and painted by 1888 by Eduardo Lebiedzky, featuring famous heroes and personalities in Greek history.
Photos: (0)                     Phone: N/A             Email: N/A
This unique pharmacy has kept its original structure and design for the past two generations and still operates as an everyday pharmacy. However, it looks and feels more like a museum, as a step through its door is similar to a step back in time.
Photos: (0)                     Phone: N/A             Email: N/A
A Hydriot fighter in the Greek Revolutionary War of 1821, Antonios Kriezi went on to become Prime Minister of the newly liberated Greek state twice. Today a statue honoring his memory can be found along the stone-paved coastal road leading towards Mandraki.
Photos: (0)                     Phone: N/A             Email: N/A
No visit to Athens is complete without passing by Syntagma Square and the Parliament, originally the Royal Palace of King Otto. Completed in 1843 it is loved for the change of the Evzone guards outside and is home to the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier. Check out the National Gardens behind too.
Photos: (0)                     Phone: N/A             Email: N/A
The 19th century Athens works factory in a previously rundown area has been reinvented and transformed into a bustling cultural complex where many exhibitions and shows take place, with some permanent exhibitions too.
Photos: (0)                     Phone: N/A             Email: N/A
Decisions concerning the future of the newly liberated state were made in this first parliament building from 1827 -1828. Touring the Cathedral makes one feel almost as if they are transported back in time to the country's founding days and the historic artifacts as well as icons and murals make it well worth the visit.
Photos: (0)                     Phone: N/A             Email: N/A
Next to the Cathedral lies this neoclassical building given to the island in 1830 by a Swiss banker named Eunardios. It was turned into a school of teaching and offered prospective educators three-month training courses
Photos: (0)                     Phone: N/A             Email: N/A
Another building which traces its roots back to the early days of the newly formed state is the Government House. The leader of liberated Greece, Ioannis Kapodistriou resided here and the structure also contained offices and records. The island's modern day archives are stored on the first floor of the building.
Photos: (0)                     Phone: N/A             Email: N/A
Within a pine forest located just below the historical mansion belonging to the same family, lies the tomb of grandson, Pavlos Koundouriotis. Served as leader of the Greek fleet during the Balkan Wars (1924-1926) as well as President of the then Hellenic Democracy (1926-1929).
Photos: (0)                     Phone: N/A             Email: N/A
Today known as Palea Loutra or Old Baths located on 8 Kyristou Street, the baths were mentiond in 1667 by Turkish traveler Evlia Celebi. There is an interesting multi-domed bath complex on the rear end. Open for visitors from 10 am to 2.30 pm.
Photos: (0)                     Phone: N/A             Email: N/A
As the first element of Hydra to greet incoming visitors from the sea, the island’s scattered windmills can be found in a variety of conditions, ranging from near perfect preservation to crumbling ruins.
Photos: (0)                     Phone: N/A             Email: N/A
The Zappas family, Greeks from Romania, had this neoclassical structure built by Danish architect Theophil Freiherr von Hansen. It often houses exhibitions and features a lovely outdoor coffee shop, ideal in good weather. Access to the main National Gardens is very close.
Photos: (0)                     Phone: N/A             Email: N/A
Sub Destinations for Athens & Attica
Other Activities for Athens & Attica
Share:
Tools:

Discover Greece by prefecture

Social
Media