Archaeology in Macedonia


Originally called 'Nine Roads' for the nine roads leading out of it, Amphipolis was where the Persian king Xerxes buried alive 9 youths and another 9 maidens to appease the gods after his defeat at the Battle of Salamis.
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Mentioned by the historian Herodotus in the 5th century BC as 'Siris,' from the word sirios, meaning sun, the remains of the ancient acropolis and Byzantine tower overlook the modern city of Serres from its northern well-to-do pine-clad Koulas district.
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Once an important trading centre of ancient Bisaltia, along the banks of the Strymonas, near the modern town of the same name, the city was colonized by settlers from Thassos island.
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Eight kilometres to the southeast of Serres, an ancient cemetery, or necropolis, discovered here unearthed some interesting finds when it was the subject of an archaeological dig in 1987.
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Sintia lies north of Lake Kerkini and modern Mandraki. Roman writer Livy mentions the frontier town of Sintia, in ancient Dardania, as the first town seized by Philip V after he conquered neighbouring Illyria in 215-205 BC.
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A small settlement of Bisaltia founded by colonists from Argilos in the 6th century BC. Its currency showed Hermes’ head and ears of barley or bunches of grapes. It was destroyed by invading Thracian or Galatian tribes and abandoned in the 3rd century BC.
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The site along the coast was discovered in 1883 following the texts of Herodotus, who wrote that in 480 BC Persian general Xerxes conscripted the inhabitants of Argilos into his army. The city, overlooking the sea, was founded in the 7th century BC by settlers from Andros.
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Lying 3 kilometers east of the village of the same name, Gazoros was mentioned by Alexander’s general Ptolemy. The cult of Artemis Gazoria was worshipped up until Roman times. It later became a 'polis' under Philip II of Macedon.
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Likely originally founded in the marshland around Lake Achinos by Paionians or the Edones tribe from the Thermaic Gulf to the west, the Ichnaeans may have participated in the Macedonian colonization of Amphipolis.
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Located just below the juncture where the river Aggitis meets the Strymonas, Myrkinos was in the territory of the Thracian Edonian tribe. It was founded in 497 BC by colonists from Miletus as a reward for their help to the Persian king Darius.
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The ruins of the ancient city of Tintos lie just northeast of Sitohori, but most of it remains unexcavated and shrouded in mystery.
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